cylinder liner removal.
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  1. #1
    Fellow Frogger!
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    Default cylinder liner removal.

    I'm sure this has been answered in the past, but I've searched and the best I came up with was get a hard wood drift and whack it with a big hammer. Well there is no fear of them just falling out when you flip the motor upside down, mine are well and truly stuck.

    Are there any methods I should know about other then the timber drift method as I'm just filling my motor up with wood chips. Its an 847 if that makes any difference. As fas as I can figure there is not much mechanical support other then the lip at the bottom and the o-rings. Should I be able to see a gap between the liner the block when looking from the bottom? Or is this a tight fit?

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    Christian

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    1000+ Posts J-man's Avatar
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    Default cylinder liner removal.

    Hi Christian, I filled mine with wood chips too, so I resorted to a brass drift
    cheers,

    John

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    1000+ Posts jo proffi's Avatar
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    You guys need better wood.


    Try hardwood, and hard harwood at that. Then you can use a bigger hammer.
    No gap can be seen, or else your coolant would fall down that gap into the oil sump.



    Jo

  4. #4
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    I'll go in search of some harder hard wood tomorrow. There is plenty to work on in the mean time. And I'm using a 4lb baby sledge hammer, not sure I want to use anything any bigger

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    COL
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    They can be a bugger to get out sometimes, especially if they have been in there for 30 years.

    Just takes persistence with some hard wood and a hammer.
    Regards Col

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    Too many posts! JohnW's Avatar
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    And maybe a bigger hammer. It's like the parallel enquiry about the crankshaft pulley bolt. It needs a really good shock sometimes. Get some good old growth jarrah and a mallet that is about half sledge hammer head size and really whack it. A little carpenter's claw hammer won't do it.

    A big brass drift would do, but I'd always want the shock transmitted over the whole circumference of the sleeve. Even though brass is softer than steel, that doesn't mean you can't break it if hitting sideways.

    You could help it with the use of WD40 applied regularly for a month or two as well. Are you in a rush?

    Good luck.
    JohnW

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    Quote Originally Posted by COL View Post
    They can be a bugger to get out sometimes, especially if they have been in there for 30 years.

    Just takes persistence with some hard wood and a hammer.
    There's a thought. 30 years. Mine haven't been touched since I rebuilt the R8 engine in 1988. So that's 25 years. Good coolant mind you.
    JohnW

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  8. #8
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    I too split even hard hardwood last time but I found a piece hard nylon and belted that. The liners had been glued in with some sort of gasket goo even down the sides.

  9. #9
    1000+ Posts Frans's Avatar
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    It is easy. Use MOT 000. Designed and made by me.

    I have a few pieces of aluminium (3 at the moment and might become more) that is cut to be the same as the liner at the bottom. Then I have a thick bar that lies diagonally across and above the liner and and is bolted down by a main bearing bolt on either end. In the center of this bar I have drilled a hole and tapped it M12. I then screw a M12 bolt in and it pushes on the aluminium bar lying neatly on the liner. I then just start turning it with a socket wrench and it acts like a pusher rather than puller and pushes the liner out. Has not failed yet.

    I will then bolt the bar across the next liner using the next 2 main bearing bolts.

    It takes an hour or two to make it but it works and can be used over and over again.

    Frans.
    Old enough to know better
    Young enough to do it anyway.

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    All Perfectly good suggestions
    Beware it is real easy to crack a liner at the base and equally easy to not see it and have lots of problems later !!!!
    If you have access to a space heater cook the block for 45 mins that should help if there is any sealant down there you can't see
    I would go with wood and fill the block with splinters it takes time,but does no damage
    When the liners are out you can check them by holding lightly between thumb and forefinger and tapping with something metalic,they should ring, if they are dull (like hitting lead ) check for cracks
    Make sure you do this no more than a couple of inches above something flat and soft (yes I was the idiot who broke a liner while crack testing it!!)
    cheers
    Last edited by dauphproto; 26th January 2013 at 09:06 PM. Reason: spelling
    Well if it was easy everybody would do it

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    Quote Originally Posted by Frans View Post
    It is easy. Use MOT 000. Designed and made by me.

    I have a few pieces of aluminium (3 at the moment and might become more) that is cut to be the same as the liner at the bottom. Then I have a thick bar that lies diagonally across and above the liner and and is bolted down by a main bearing bolt on either end. In the center of this bar I have drilled a hole and tapped it M12. I then screw a M12 bolt in and it pushes on the aluminium bar lying neatly on the liner. I then just start turning it with a socket wrench and it acts like a pusher rather than puller and pushes the liner out. Has not failed yet.

    I will then bolt the bar across the next liner using the next 2 main bearing bolts.

    It takes an hour or two to make it but it works and can be used over and over again.

    Frans.
    Neat. Photo?
    JohnW

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    Too many posts! JohnW's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by dauphproto View Post
    All Perfectly good suggestions
    Beware it is real easy to crack a liner at the base and equally easy to not see it and have lots of problems later !!!!
    If you have access to a space heater cook the block for 45 mins that should help if there is any sealant down there you can't see
    I would go with wood and fill the block with splinters it takes time,but does no damage
    When the liners are out you can check them by holding lightly between thumb and forefinger and tapping with something metalic,they should ring, if they are dull (like hitting lead ) check for cracks
    Make sure you do this no more than a couple of inches above something flat and soft (yes I was the idiot who broke a liner while crack testing it!!)
    cheers
    I'll bet you're no orphan though.
    JohnW

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    CitroŽn CX Pallas 1980 (moved on to new custodian)

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  13. #13
    Member dauphproto's Avatar
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    The man who never broke anything never made anything (proverb)

    I will get the pics of the rear suspension done I PROMISE when the weather eases up a bit
    Well if it was easy everybody would do it

  14. #14
    1000+ Posts renault8&10's Avatar
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    I made a little frame to help get them out. I'll put up a photo later on.
    KB


  15. #15
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    I got them out, but it took about 2 hours. I used a very hard piece of hard wood to get them out to the point where they are flush on the sump side, they still wouldn't move. Now for the part that took all the time, I used a brass drift, which I had to file back lots of times as I kept breaking the edge off it. There was no way they were going to just fall out.

    I know all about o-ring pressure seals, I work in underwater robotics where seal failure can be quite catastrophic, but these where so tight that I think the o-ring could have been left out and they wouldn't have leaked at the pressures involved.

    Speaking of o-rings, does anyone who what material and size they are meant to be? Or if they are an odd ball size.

  16. #16
    COL
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    Quote Originally Posted by c.lees View Post
    I got them out, but it took about 2 hours. I used a very hard piece of hard wood to get them out to the point where they are flush on the sump side, they still wouldn't move. Now for the part that took all the time, I used a brass drift, which I had to file back lots of times as I kept breaking the edge off it. There was no way they were going to just fall out.

    I know all about o-ring pressure seals, I work in underwater robotics where seal failure can be quite catastrophic, but these where so tight that I think the o-ring could have been left out and they wouldn't have leaked at the pressures involved.

    Speaking of o-rings, does anyone who what material and size they are meant to be? Or if they are an odd ball size.
    The "O-ring" seals will be in the gasket set that you will need to re-build the engine.
    Regards Col

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  17. #17
    1000+ Posts renault8&10's Avatar
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    I think 1.4 are the genuine rubber "O-ring" as COL says, the others used the plasticy-paper spacers as far as I know.
    KB


  18. #18
    1000+ Posts jo proffi's Avatar
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    I buy cylinder O-rings from Caravelle imports.
    Cant say he has ones for your motor but worth a try.

    Jo

  19. #19
    1000+ Posts J-man's Avatar
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    Default cylinder liner removal.

    I may have a spare set. Sing out if you get stuck and I'll have a look.
    cheers,

    John

  20. #20
    1000+ Posts geckoeng's Avatar
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    Hi Guys,
    Sorry to have taken so long but could not find my 1400 tool and had to make one for the 1300G. The G sleves were glued in with green sealer all on the skirts. A good gentle blow (2 to 3) with a 4lb instrument on the tool and the sleeves were out. Very similar with my 1400 R5G/A, they were in tight and a similar tool did the trick.



    cylinder liner removal.-liner-extractor-1.jpgcylinder liner removal.-liner-extractor-2.jpg

    Ray
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  21. #21
    VIP Sponsor 59 Floride's Avatar
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    Nice one Ray, I'll probably need to make one for my Fregate. I already posses a 4lb 'instrument' so just need the drift...
    Every day when I wake up I reach up in the darkness with my eyes shut and if I cannot feel anything that resembles a wooden lid I know it will be a good day. No lid today.

  22. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by geckoeng View Post
    Hi Guys,
    Sorry to have taken so long but could not find my 1400 tool and had to make one for the 1300G. The G sleves were glued in with green sealer all on the skirts. A good gentle blow (2 to 3) with a 4lb instrument on the tool and the sleeves were out. Very similar with my 1400 R5G/A, they were in tight and a similar tool did the trick. Ray
    Glued!! Good grief. I can understand why you made the tool. I've always managed with a brass drift and a few sharp whacks just to break what little adhesion had developed. But glued....
    JohnW

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  23. #23
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    I've recently stripped my spare motor, and found that a piece of aluminium square tubing did the trick. I'm sure round section would be just as good. Hard enough to transfer the "shock " from the hammer, but soft enough not to crack the sleeves.

    Henry

  24. #24
    VIP Sponsor 59 Floride's Avatar
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    Thanks for the tool tip Ray, here's my version.

    Having a long handle makes it a cinch and no damage occurred to the liners or my fingers.

    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails cylinder liner removal.-003.jpg  
    Last edited by 59 Floride; 13th February 2014 at 03:43 PM.
    Every day when I wake up I reach up in the darkness with my eyes shut and if I cannot feel anything that resembles a wooden lid I know it will be a good day. No lid today.

  25. #25
    1000+ Posts geckoeng's Avatar
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    Well there you go then ......... !!!


    And my mother used to call me stupid !!!!!!!
    Ray geckoeng

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