Tasman Bridge
  • Help
Results 1 to 20 of 20

Thread: Tasman Bridge

  1. #1
    Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    Hobart
    Posts
    53

    Default Tasman Bridge

    Listen to your mechanic when he says "the distributor / coil / fuel pump & points need to be replaced"! Because you don't want to be stranded on 'The Bridge'. The bridge in question is the Tasman Bridge which connects East & West Hobart.
    And after dropping friends off on the Eastern Shore (who raved over the car) I headed home. A quarter of the way up 'The Bridge' no power whatsoever! Two lanes into town and three out, and I am taking up one of them. No four-way-flashers here in a 1972 Peugeout 504! I shat!
    I climbed the rail to the walkway like a crazed Magilla Gorilla, only to hear the screech of tyres trying to stop and avoid my dear Mitterrand. Trying to flag down two police cars to no avail, I stood on the overhang as cars screamed to a halt. Finally a policeman arrived and put his flashers on (on his car). Thank God I thought, at least there will be a buffer when the truck rams into the back of the Peugeot.
    Now I must admit, they are a foul mouthed bunch of bastards in Hobart. The language they used as they passed my poor Mitterrand was disgusting, even in front of a policeman! Just because I had caused traffic chaos almost back to the airport did not expunge the filth of people telling me to burn my car.
    Although, congratulations to the yobbo who said,'Burn the French piece of shit'. I thought that was very nice that he recognised that it was a French car.
    Eventually I was rescued by the RACT and sent to my French Car Care in Kingston and traffic flow started to flow.
    All the electrics replaced, I headed home, and broke down again! Damn it, the coil was faulty. But since then the car has been fantastic. Heaps more power, using a lot less fuel, and I even invested in a heavy duty battery which is wonderful in cold Hobart.
    Off to see Craig at French Car Care next week to get the leaky brake fluid fixed. It's the clutch leaking into the cabin. He tells me that it is a simple job and only about $200 so that makes me happy.
    On my old girl, the electrics are expensive, but the brakes and clutch are cheap, so Quelle Supre.

    Advertisement

  2. #2
    VIP Sponsor 59 Floride's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    It's how I roll...Brisbane
    Posts
    33,644

    Default

    Good story and as far as a place to break down, that is about as bad as it can get.....I reckon everytime we drive our old cars we never really know if we will get back home again...and I am a big fan of fitting the biggest battery that you can fit in when you own an old car.

  3. #3
    1000+ Posts
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    HOBART
    Posts
    1,265

    Default

    If you need a brake master cylinder (new) I have one for sale.
    1998 Peugeot 406 D8SV Manual
    1999 Peugeot 406 D8ST Auto
    2002 Peugeot 406 D9SV Manual
    1994 Peuegot 306 N3 Cabriolet Manual
    1994 Peugeot 306 XR N3 Hatch
    1995 Peugeot 505 GTI executive
    1976 Peugeot 504 Sedan - Now sold

    Over 60 Pugs in my time
    Gerry Mullock

  4. #4
    Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    Hobart
    Posts
    53

    Default

    Had the clutch / break fluid leak fixed and it was quite inexpensive. Just a new clutch cylindar, which on my old model was quite cheap. That is all the major items done now and when I went back through my list of receipts the Pug has only cost me $2200, on top of the initial purchase price of $2000. What a fantastic vehicle for $4200! A large four door sedan, with fantastic suspension, great brakes, power and economy to boot, and what fantastic style, I am recognised!
    I have to take my hat off to Craig Salmon at French Car Care at Kingston, near Hobart. To find a mechanic who knows his cars and really cares about my Pug. What a great service.
    Now I can concentrate on the niceties like sheepskin covers for the seats and rear louvres.

  5. #5
    Fellow Frogger! paulrb's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    Geelong
    Posts
    214

    Default Ain't other drivers so 'NICE'

    Quote Originally Posted by declan67 View Post
    Now I can concentrate on the niceties like sheepskin covers for the seats and rear louvres.
    And fluffy dice.... it is crucial on an early 80s car.....


    Still good story..... In Melbourne now they have vans with large cushions on the front of them. They push you out of the way. Well if I was a Pug enthusiast I'd stop..... Although probably in front so as not to get whacked myself.

    Have you thought about buying a LED flashing triangle or two.... they are available from Supercheap Auto etc... not expensive.
    Current Beasts:
    '89 405 Mi16
    '98 406 ST TD Wagon
    '90 405 MI16
    '67 Morris Mini

    Recent Pugs..
    '94 306 XR
    '01 306 XT
    '98 306 XT

  6. #6
    Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    Hobart
    Posts
    53

    Default

    Anybody had problems with coils on a 504? Afterthe Tasman Bridge Affair I replaced all the electrics, new battery and got 10 minutes up the road before the coil gave out. Replaced and did another 300 miles before coil number two gave out. Can't work out what could be the problem. Don't want to have to drive aroumd with a six pack of them in the boot!

  7. #7
    1000+ Posts stuartb's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2002
    Location
    somewhere over the rainbow
    Posts
    1,445

    Default

    is it supposed to have a resistor thats been removed...if its a resistor model it supposed to only get full voltage when starting and a reduced volage for running (in effect a fat spark for starting...sort of a 9v coil that supposed to only get full 12v when the starter is engaged, then when its going a dropping resistor lowers the voltage)..if it gets the full 12v all the time it'll burn out quickly

  8. #8
    1000+ Posts PugMonkey's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    Brisbane
    Posts
    1,376

    Default

    Aahh good boy - My motto, don't do things by halves!
    ....now watch a Peugeot turn into a corner!

  9. #9
    Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    Melbourne/VIC/Australia
    Posts
    43

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by stuartb View Post
    is it supposed to have a resistor thats been removed...if its a resistor model it supposed to only get full voltage when starting and a reduced volage for running (in effect a fat spark for starting...sort of a 9v coil that supposed to only get full 12v when the starter is engaged, then when its going a dropping resistor lowers the voltage)..if it gets the full 12v all the time it'll burn out quickly
    Sounds very much the likely scenario. It's known as a ballast resistor coil. Ballast resistor coils do end up with a premature death when used without the resistor.

  10. #10
    Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    snug tasmainia australia
    Posts
    48

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by declan67 View Post
    Listen to your mechanic when he says "the distributor / coil / fuel pump & points need to be replaced"! Because you don't want to be stranded on 'The Bridge'. The bridge in question is the Tasman Bridge which connects East & West Hobart.
    And after dropping friends off on the Eastern Shore (who raved over the car) I headed home. A quarter of the way up 'The Bridge' no power whatsoever! Two lanes into town and three out, and I am taking up one of them. No four-way-flashers here in a 1972 Peugeout 504! I shat!
    I climbed the rail to the walkway like a crazed Magilla Gorilla, only to hear the screech of tyres trying to stop and avoid my dear Mitterrand. Trying to flag down two police cars to no avail, I stood on the overhang as cars screamed to a halt. Finally a policeman arrived and put his flashers on (on his car). Thank God I thought, at least there will be a buffer when the truck rams into the back of the Peugeot.
    Now I must admit, they are a foul mouthed bunch of bastards in Hobart. The language they used as they passed my poor Mitterrand was disgusting, even in front of a policeman! Just because I had caused traffic chaos almost back to the airport did not expunge the filth of people telling me to burn my car.
    Although, congratulations to the yobbo who said,'Burn the French piece of shit'. I thought that was very nice that he recognised that it was a French car.
    Eventually I was rescued by the RACT and sent to my French Car Care in Kingston and traffic flow started to flow.
    All the electrics replaced, I headed home, and broke down again! Damn it, the coil was faulty. But since then the car has been fantastic. Heaps more power, using a lot less fuel, and I even invested in a heavy duty battery which is wonderful in cold Hobart.
    Off to see Craig at French Car Care next week to get the leaky brake fluid fixed. It's the clutch leaking into the cabin. He tells me that it is a simple job and only about $200 so that makes me happy.
    On my old girl, the electrics are expensive, but the brakes and clutch are cheap, so Quelle Supre.

    you poor bastard thats my worst nightmare on that bridge i always have that dreded feeling when i get on it i love the part when you reach the top and your on the downhill section you know you pretty much right then, i suppose thats why they made it like that to help us out in our dodgy old french cars mind you ive seen a few aussie pices of shit worth burning broken down on it including a old holden 1 tonner ute broke down right on the glenochy exit overpass i almost plowed into the back of him with my old G60 patrol with a car trailer on the back.

  11. #11
    Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    Hobart
    Posts
    53

    Default

    Thanks for the advice. Because it is the older variety it shouldn't need the suppressor. But I think it will be a trial and error thing. Hopefully no more error. If it happens again I think we shall ne to investigate putting a suppressor on it and see if that works. So far the mechanic and I think the first coil was the wrong type, and the second was faulty. Keep you posted.

  12. #12
    1000+ Posts stuartb's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2002
    Location
    somewhere over the rainbow
    Posts
    1,445

    Default

    a suppressor and a resistor are totally different things. all you need to do is buy a 12v non ballast resistor coil if here's no resistor. if you put a resistor type coil on with no resistor in the circuit it will burn out. The coil is either one or the other.

  13. #13
    BVH Roger Wilkinson's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    Warrnambool
    Posts
    2,399

    Default

    Are the points dwell and the ignition timing spot on? If they are out the coil can heat up. I had that problem on my DS19 until I set up the ignition fastidiously. It has twin points and twin coils, but the principle is still the same.

    At least the Bolte Bridge over the Yarra River in Melbourne has an emergency lane. It came in handy once, when my DS19 ran so low on hydraulic fluid that I lost clutch engagement just before the top.

    Roger

  14. #14
    Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    Hobart
    Posts
    53

    Default

    Thanks for the advice Roger. We do have a bit of a problem with the timing as there is nowhere to put a timing light. Adjust, back off, adjust, back off. I think we are getting closer!

  15. #15
    1000+ Posts robmac's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Melbourne / Caulfield
    Posts
    19,211

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by declan67 View Post
    Thanks for the advice Roger. We do have a bit of a problem with the timing as there is nowhere to put a timing light. Adjust, back off, adjust, back off. I think we are getting closer!
    If it's hit and miss adjustment you need to find a mechanic who knows about older cars and older (Kettering) ignition systems.

    It just about the most basic service to set point gap (dwell angle) and ignition timing on an XN engine.

    If the coil has 12 volts on the bottom it's a non ballast coil and does not need a resistor. If it has 8 volts on the bottom it is a ballast coil and needs a resistor.

    You only need basic tools and strobe light for setting the timing.

    Connect the timing light across the battery and have the inductive pick clamped to number 1 plug (rearmost cylinder) The front pulley has the timing mark and timing cover has a degree scale. Any mechanic should have an engine analyser that displays dwell angle to set the points. A feeler gauge is OK but is less accurate.
    The less one interacts with rude, ignorant, critical and argumentative members. The more peaceful life becomes.

  16. #16
    1000+ Posts bluey504's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Dandenong Vic
    Posts
    1,269

    Default

    Or Rob he may have the 'drop long phillips head screw driver through bell housing' type of set up after some idiot has taken off/lost/damaged timing marker plate!
    You then use a test light to time the engine in a totally static way ie not running at all.
    It does work but the patience of Job is sometimes required initially. Had a very early 504 with the original 1.8 that a 'mechanic' had tuned with timing light but it ran like a Dawg as there wasn't a timing plate to reference off and to compound the mistake he wrote down the setting which wasn't even close. Plus the point gap was out my kilometers, we are a French car forum after all, the spark plugs where out to something like 0.8mm and I wondered why it ran poorly when I first got it!
    If possible use one of the Bosch transistor type coils, they are really tough, but Declan 67 has to decide if they suit the under bonnet look.

  17. #17
    BVH Roger Wilkinson's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    Warrnambool
    Posts
    2,399

    Default

    declan, I think you are on the right track with setting the timing. Adjust, back off and so on. I reckon what with modern fuels, worn engines and so on, the chances of the factory specified timing being optimum are not great. Set it by feel and road test, as you seem to be doing. But make sure the dwell is spot on before you adjust the timing, as changing the dwell will change the timing. There is no substitute for a dwell meter. A feeler gauge is not bad with new points, but any wear on the points will mean the gap as measured by the feeler gauge blade will not be the same as the gap seen by the spark. The dwell meter measures the gap the same way as the spark. On the twin points setup on my DS19, the dwell on the two sets of points has to be just right and exactly equal or a coil heats up.

    Roger

  18. #18
    1000+ Posts robmac's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Melbourne / Caulfield
    Posts
    19,211

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by bluey504 View Post
    Or Rob he may have the 'drop long phillips head screw driver through bell housing' type of set up after some idiot has taken off/lost/damaged timing marker plate!
    You then use a test light to time the engine in a totally static way ie not running at all.
    It does work but the patience of Job is sometimes required initially. Had a very early 504 with the original 1.8 that a 'mechanic' had tuned with timing light but it ran like a Dawg as there wasn't a timing plate to reference off and to compound the mistake he wrote down the setting which wasn't even close. Plus the point gap was out my kilometers, we are a French car forum after all, the spark plugs where out to something like 0.8mm and I wondered why it ran poorly when I first got it!
    If possible use one of the Bosch transistor type coils, they are really tough, but Declan 67 has to decide if they suit the under bonnet look.
    I'm not sure the 2000 flywheels have the timing slot, or indeed if 504 bell housings have a hole.

    I know the 1600 and 1800 404/504 have the slot and the hole. The 1600s & 1800s don't have a timing plate.

    Really the only way to the timing without any marks is to create some.

    Find No1 TDC on the firing stoke (both valves closed and piston at TDC) The fit a calibrated degree disk to the front pulley at 0 and turn the engine to correct advance and mark the timing cover off the pulley notch.

    You need pull the tappet cover off and stick a screwdriver down the rear plug 'ole.

    The cowboys amongst us will ascertain timing by advancing the dissy until the engine pings ON load in top and retarding a touch
    The less one interacts with rude, ignorant, critical and argumentative members. The more peaceful life becomes.

  19. #19
    Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    Hobart
    Posts
    53

    Default

    That's my weekend occupation, hills and retardation. Nowhere to put the timing light otherwise it would have been done. All just adds to the joy and charachter of the 504.

  20. #20
    Fellow Frogger!
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Sydney
    Posts
    351

    Default

    Rob ,my 78 504 has both the hole in the bellhousing and the slot in the flywheel [and the old phillips head screwdriver still has a mark from where I forgot to take it out 25 years ago when I tried to start it] Neil

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •