Group 2 504 Rally car description
  • Help
Page 1 of 2 12 Last
Results 1 to 25 of 27
  1. #1
    VIP Sponsor
    Join Date
    Aug 2000
    Posts
    9,474

    Default Group 2 504 Rally car description

    I found this information today, a description of the works Group 2 504s dating from 1975.
    It has been translated by Google so a few strange bits.
    For example the name of the co driver Flocon is translated to snowflake!
    Graham

    Advertisement


    http://translate.google.com.au/trans...26prmd%3Divnsb

  2. #2
    Fellow Frogger!
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    Athens, Greece
    Posts
    661

    Default

    Interesting read, Graham, thanks for posting.

  3. #3
    1000+ Posts Mike Tippett's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2002
    Location
    Vancouver Island, Canada
    Posts
    1,797

    Default

    The read is better in French but yeah, great find!
    1966 Peugeot 404 Coupé Injection post-restoration reassembly underway!
    Register your 404: https://recensement.leclub404.com/submit.php

  4. #4
    Fellow Frogger! 908HDI's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    Gold Coast, Australia
    Posts
    380

    Default

    Great Read. Thanks.

    2 Ltr 4 Cylinder block same as the 202 but with 170 HP in stage 2

    The 1978 Ti only manages 175HP.... Hmmm. Interesting.

    How quickly things moved on only 6 years later with the 205 T16....

  5. #5
    Fellow Frogger! Doush_504's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    Cairo, Egypt
    Posts
    641

    Default

    I didn't even try to read the translated version as I knew it would be ridiculous
    Thank you Graham, great read indeed.
    Chadi

    1982 504 SR white manual sedan with A/C (266 000 Km)
    2012 308 1.6 VTi Vapor Grey manual H/B (52000 Km)
    1994 405 1.6 white manual sedan (236 000 Km)
    1992 605 SV24 (91 000 Km)
    2005 406 2.0L automatic (Replaced with a 2013 C5)
    1983 505 GR white manual sedan with A/C (170000 Km)

    All since new


  6. #6
    VIP Sponsor
    Join Date
    Aug 2000
    Posts
    9,474

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by 908HDI View Post
    Great Read. Thanks.

    2 Ltr 4 Cylinder block same as the 202 but with 170 HP in stage 2

    The 1978 Ti only manages 175HP.... Hmmm. Interesting.

    How quickly things moved on only 6 years later with the 205 T16....
    Still trying to work out what they meant by 202?

  7. #7
    1000+ Posts bluey504's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Dandenong Vic
    Posts
    1,273

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by GRAHAM WALLIS View Post
    Still trying to work out what they meant by 202?
    Pretty sure it isn't the dunger Holden motor.
    203 makes far more sense as the basic design but the 403 is more genetically similar.

  8. #8
    VIP Sponsor
    Join Date
    Aug 2000
    Posts
    9,474

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by bluey504 View Post
    Pretty sure it isn't the dunger Holden motor.
    203 makes far more sense as the basic design but the 403 is more genetically similar.
    It would be none of those, the 203 motor is almost identical with 403 and quite a bit different to 504 although some things such as cam followers are interchangeable.
    Graham

  9. #9
    Fellow Frogger! racing405's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Traralgon
    Posts
    649

    Default

    Makes me wish I still had my 1974 504 - twin round lights, cracked dash and all!

  10. #10
    Fellow Frogger! 908HDI's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    Gold Coast, Australia
    Posts
    380

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by GRAHAM WALLIS View Post
    Still trying to work out what they meant by 202?
    The only logical conclusion would be if the article was reffering to a 402 as the 202 had a small capacity engine.

    The question then is, was the 504 2 Ltr block the same as the original 402 2 Ltr with a different bore and stroke ? The 402 engine is 1991 cc and the later version was 2142cc. The 504 2 Ltr is 1971 cc.

    Maybe Mike Tippet and Jurgen could elaborate on the translation.....

  11. #11
    Fellow Frogger!
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    Athens, Greece
    Posts
    661

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by GRAHAM WALLIS View Post
    Still trying to work out what they meant by 202?
    I think it is the serial number when they switched from 1.8 to 2 liters.

  12. #12
    Fellow Frogger! 908HDI's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    Gold Coast, Australia
    Posts
    380

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Thanos View Post
    I think it is the serial number when they switched from 1.8 to 2 liters.
    Peugeot did not switch from the 1.8 to the 2.0. They produced both variants. The 504 1.8 [ 1796cc ] was produced up until 1981 if not later from memory.....This was used in the original 504 and then the "L" entry level 504. The last 504 1.8 was just badged "504". It was also used in the pick up [ ute ]. I am reffering to European production. Kenya and Nigeria still produced both engine variants up until 2006. That is one long lived car.

  13. #13
    Fellow Frogger!
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    Athens, Greece
    Posts
    661

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by 908HDI View Post
    Peugeot did not switch from the 1.8 to the 2.0. They produced both variants. The 504 1.8 [ 1796cc ] was produced up until 1981 if not later from memory.....This was used in the original 504 and then the "L" entry level 504. The last 504 1.8 was just badged "504". It was also used in the pick up [ ute ]. I am reffering to European production. Kenya and Nigeria still produced both engine variants up until 2006. That is one long lived car.
    The IRS cars (and thus the rally cars) were all two liter after 1970, diesel and 1.8 had live axle and rear drum brakes and none of the 1.8 liter (except for the early Argentinean XNA's) had the 4 port head used by the rally cars.

  14. #14
    Fellow Frogger! 908HDI's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    Gold Coast, Australia
    Posts
    380

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Thanos View Post
    The IRS cars (and thus the rally cars) were all two liter after 1970, diesel and 1.8 had live axle and rear drum brakes and none of the 1.8 liter (except for the early Argentinean XNA's) had the 4 port head used by the rally cars.
    Sorry, I thought you reffering to general engine production.

    The 1971cc estates / wagons also had Live axles and rear drum brakes....

    In 1982 Mark Thatcher, the son of Margaret Thatcher the UK Prime Minister at that time, used a white 504 2.0L estate / wagon in the Paris Dakkar rally. I remember watching the news at the time when he and his team mates went missing for a few days. They were found 50km off course. This was a private entry so the 504 was a stock car with regulation modifications.

  15. #15
    Fellow Frogger! Doush_504's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    Cairo, Egypt
    Posts
    641

    Default

    "Généralement les premiers efforts de préparation d'une Gr 2 sont fait sur le groupe propulseur. Ici, il s'agit du 4 cylindre en ligne maison, de 2 litres de cylindrée, dont les premiers exemplaires équipaient déjà les 202 ! "

    It is clearly stated that the first examples of the 4 cylinder 2L engine they were working on were already powering the 202.
    IMHO it doesn't make sense, maybe a typing mistake.
    Chadi

    1982 504 SR white manual sedan with A/C (266 000 Km)
    2012 308 1.6 VTi Vapor Grey manual H/B (52000 Km)
    1994 405 1.6 white manual sedan (236 000 Km)
    1992 605 SV24 (91 000 Km)
    2005 406 2.0L automatic (Replaced with a 2013 C5)
    1983 505 GR white manual sedan with A/C (170000 Km)

    All since new


  16. #16
    Fellow Frogger! Uffee's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    Adelaide
    Posts
    651

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by 908HDI View Post
    Sorry, I thought you reffering to general engine production.

    The 1971cc estates / wagons also had Live axles and rear drum brakes....

    In 1982 Mark Thatcher, the son of Margaret Thatcher the UK Prime Minister at that time, used a white 504 2.0L estate / wagon in the Paris Dakkar rally. I remember watching the news at the time when he and his team mates went missing for a few days. They were found 50km off course. This was a private entry so the 504 was a stock car with regulation modifications.
    Stock car inasmuch as a Dangel is stock. He managed to rip the entire rear suspension of the back of the gearbox, he described it as a design flaw. As a manufacturer, I don't think you should be held responsible for upper class twits abusing your equipment.
    504 GL Coupe '73 Silver
    504 GTDT Pickup Mini-Motorhome '83 Coral Red
    407 HDi Sedan '05

  17. #17
    1000+ Posts Mike Tippett's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2002
    Location
    Vancouver Island, Canada
    Posts
    1,797

    Default

    The 202 had an 1100!
    1966 Peugeot 404 Coupé Injection post-restoration reassembly underway!
    Register your 404: https://recensement.leclub404.com/submit.php

  18. #18
    Fellow Frogger! 908HDI's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    Gold Coast, Australia
    Posts
    380

    Default

    It does not matter who you are when things go wrong but its no good blaming your equipment...

    I thought it was the steering that broke.

    The Paris Dakkar is and always was very hard on every car entered. The Peugeot's proved their endurance.

  19. #19
    Fellow Frogger!
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    Athens, Greece
    Posts
    661

    Default

    It is a good idea to remember that what we put down as fact should be factual; this thread will be a valuable recourse for many people and pointing them in the wrong direction, however unintentionally, is not what this forum is all about. Speaking from personal experience, lots of time can be wasted when, based on false information, one looks for something that never existed. For the sake of brevity:

    Quote Originally Posted by 908HDI View Post
    ..In 1982 Mark Thatcher, the son of Margaret Thatcher the UK Prime Minister at that time, used a white 504 2.0L estate / wagon in the Paris Dakkar rally...
    Quote Originally Posted by Uffee View Post
    Stock car inasmuch as a Dangel is stock...
    As Uffee very correctly mentioned, it was a 4x4 Dangel and an example of that is shown in the photo below. Anyone thinking of entering a Dakar-type event with a standard 504 station wagon can look forward to a very short event.

    Quote Originally Posted by Uffee View Post
    ...He managed to rip the entire rear suspension of the back of the gearbox, he described it as a design flaw...
    Design flaw? The Dangels have taken all the beating the French forest service and farmers around the world could dish out and kept on wheeling. How uncommon for somebody from a family of politicians to blame somebody else for his ineptitude!

    Quote Originally Posted by 908HDI View Post
    ... This was a private entry so the 504 was a stock car with regulation modifications....
    What regulations? The 504 station wagon was never homologated for FIA competition because Peugeot could not homologate it. The FIA rules list a maximum cabin volume and the spacious 504 wagon exceeds that limit. Dakar, being a raid, was not subject to the FIA rules and Peugeot used that venue to promote the wagon. Most factory supported entries had the same works PRV engines as the 504 V6 coupe rally cars. (A photo of the Dangel V6 engine bay is also attached.) Others had the 2.0 engines in varying states of tune.

    On a related note (this is a 504 rally car thread after all), Peugeot homologated the 504 pick-up (ute) for FIA competition in Group B! Pitching it against the likes of Audi Quattro and Lancia 037 (especially when the 205 T16 was also homologated in group B) appears as a nonsensical move at first glance, but there was logic to that: Peugeot was aiming at the large African market and the 205 was better suited for the European market. The 504 rally pick-up (also pictured below) had the same engine as the 170 bhp Berlines described in Graham’s link, but many of the local entries opted for the detuned 140 bhp version; the improved low end torque made for a quicker (and far more durable) car over long distances in spite of the 30 bhp deficit. It is interesting to note (based on personal experience) that replacing the 4-1 extractors of the 170 bhp engine with 4-2-1 extractors would have shifted the torque band of the engine to a more useful range at a penalty of less than 10 bhp, but 4-2-1 extractors were very uncommon at the time.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Group 2 504 Rally car description-4x4-504-v6-wagon.jpg   Group 2 504 Rally car description-1984_david_horsey.jpg   Group 2 504 Rally car description-prvdakardangel.jpg  
    Last edited by Thanos; 12th June 2011 at 06:19 PM.

  20. #20
    Fellow Frogger! 908HDI's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    Gold Coast, Australia
    Posts
    380

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Thanos View Post
    It is a good idea to remember that what we put down as fact should be factual; this thread will be a valuable recourse for many people and pointing them in the wrong direction, however unintentionally, is not what this forum is all about. Speaking from personal experience, lots of time can be wasted when, based on false information, one looks for something that never existed. For the sake of brevity:





    As Uffee very correctly mentioned, it was a 4x4 Dangel and an example of that is shown in the photo below. Anyone thinking of entering a Dakar-type event with a standard 504 station wagon can look forward to a very short event.



    Design flaw? The Dangels have taken all the beating the French forest service and farmers around the world could dish out and kept on wheeling. How uncommon for somebody from a family of politicians to blame somebody else for his ineptitude!



    What regulations? The 504 station wagon was never homologated for FIA competition because Peugeot could not homologate it. The FIA rules list a maximum cabin volume and the spacious 504 wagon exceeds that limit. Dakar, being a raid, was not subject to the FIA rules and Peugeot used that venue to promote the wagon. Most factory supported entries had the same works PRV engines as the 504 V6 coupe rally cars. (A photo of the Dangel V6 engine bay is also attached.) Others had the 2.0 engines in varying states of tune.

    On a related note (this is a 504 rally car thread after all), Peugeot homologated the 504 pick-up (ute) for FIA competition in Group B! Pitching it against the likes of Audi Quattro and Lancia 037 (especially when the 205 T16 was also homologated in group B) appears as a nonsensical move at first glance, but there was logic to that: Peugeot was aiming at the large African market and the 205 was better suited for the European market. The 504 rally pick-up (also pictured below) had the same engine as the 170 bhp Berlines described in Graham’s link, but many of the local entries opted for the detuned 140 bhp version; the improved low end torque made for a quicker (and far more durable) car over long distances in spite of the 30 bhp deficit. It is interesting to note (based on personal experience) that replacing the 4-1 extractors of the 170 bhp engine with 4-2-1 extractors would have shifted the torque band of the engine to a more useful range at a penalty of less than 10 bhp, but 4-2-1 extractors were very uncommon at the time.

    I am not sure which part/s you think is/are false and non factual....

    Firstly: http://news.bbc.co.uk/onthisday/hi/d...00/2523841.stm

    Secondly: Thatcher's Dangel was a white Estate / Wagon.

    Thirdly: entering the Paris Dakkar did not mean homologation in all cases. But you did not just slap a sticker on the car and hope for the best. In 1982 there were 390 entrants and I find it difficult to believe that there were no regulations, especially safety modification regulations. The only Peugeot 504 that finished [ Pick Up / Ute Dangel [ 49th place ]] was driven by Marty and Cazalot. All the other 504 Dangel Estates / Wagons, all 10 of them including Thatchers car, did not finish.

    The original post was a great read and I added my comments as they beared relevance to the original subject [ Paris Dakkar Rally and Peugeot 504 ], which, after all, is the whole point of a forum. Sometimes we do not all cross the t's and dot the i's but I now fear that we are departing off on another tangent....

  21. #21
    Fellow Frogger!
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    Athens, Greece
    Posts
    661

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by 908HDI View Post
    The original post was a great read and I added my comments as they beared relevance to the original subject [ Paris Dakkar Rally and Peugeot 504 ]
    This thread is about GROUP 2 504 RALLY CARS. This makes it quite specific to the FIA homologated 504 Berline. (Perhaps you can start a new thread on the 504’s in the Dakar raid, I am sure it will be very interesting.) Future readers going through this thread will have to wade through, counting this one, EIGHT posts with useless to them information. Not wanting to add to that count, this will be my last post on this exchange, but courtesy dictates that I respond to your questions.

    Quote Originally Posted by 908HDI View Post
    Thatcher's Dangel was a white Estate / Wagon.
    True, but “Dangel” is the defining word here and you now mention it for the first time. From your earlier post:
    Quote Originally Posted by 908HDI View Post
    .. Mark Thatcher...used a white 504 2.0L estate / wagon in the Paris Dakkar rally... This was a private entry so the 504 was a stock car ...
    Minor detail, there is nothing “stock” about a Dangel and they were not available in Peugeot showrooms. They are very heavily modified vehicles referred to as “Dangel 504 wagon” and “Dangel 504 pick up” so the statement is certainly misleading. I wonder how many of the 500 or so readers thought “Dangel” as soon as they read your post.

    Quote Originally Posted by 908HDI View Post
    ...the 504 was a stock car with regulation modifications.
    I am curious as to your source for that statement.

    Quote Originally Posted by 908HDI View Post
    entering the Paris Dakkar did not mean homologation in all cases.
    Actually, it did not mean homologation in ANY case, there were no homologation requirements for raids.

    Quote Originally Posted by 908HDI View Post
    ...But you did not just slap a sticker on the car and hope for the best. In 1982 there were 390 entrants and I find it difficult to believe that there were no regulations, especially safety modification regulations...
    If you look up the period entry regulations, you will be very surprised by how much was left up to the entrant.

    Quote Originally Posted by 908HDI View Post
    ..I thought it was the steering that broke...
    It did, but it was not this damage per se that stranded them. They stopped to repair a broken steering arm, they were subsequently lost and eventually stranded after suffering the damage that Uffee described and a broken driveshaft casing.

    Quote Originally Posted by 908HDI View Post
    ..The Paris Dakkar is and always was very hard on every car entered. The Peugeot's proved their endurance...
    Quote Originally Posted by 908HDI View Post
    ... The only Peugeot 504 that finished [ Pick Up / Ute Dangel [ 49th place ]] was driven by Marty and Cazalot. All the other 504 Dangel Estates / Wagons, all 10 of them including Thatchers car, did not finish...
    Somehow your two statements are at odds...

    Quote Originally Posted by 908HDI View Post
    ..The Paris Dakkar is ...very hard on every car entered...
    There is no more Paris-Dakar. It is now called the Dakar and is held in Latin America.
    Quote Originally Posted by 908HDI View Post
    ...the original post was a great read and I added my comments ...which... is the whole point of a forum. Sometimes we do not all cross the t's and dot the i's ...
    But we should, the point of this form is to “share the knowledge”, not share a best guess or whatever…

    To bring this back to group 2 rally cars: Mark Thatcher’s co-driver was Anny Charlotte Veney, a ten-time Le Mans driver and member of Robert Neyret’s all-girl Aseptogyl team. Neyret, a dentist and rally driver himself, used women drivers and pink cars to promote Aseptogyl, his proprietary toothpaste. Veney’s results were unremarkable, but the team also included the notable African 504 driver Christine Dacremont. Neyret drove an all-polyester “Team Aseptogyl” 504 (pictured below) weighing well under 1000 kilos in the 1974 Bandama rally. This is very important information for FIA competitors: It provides precedent for replacing any and all steel body panels with polyester and significantly improving the power to weight ratio. The rules clearly state that all modifications used in sanctioned competitions of a historic car's competition period (FIA category I, II or III) are grandfathered in, even if they are not included in the homologation documents.
    Bob is still active, a bit slower, but by all accounts fast enough for many younger challengers. He recently competed in the Rallye du Maroc and the regularity leg of the historic Acropolis with a chopped-tail Safari-replica DS built by Daunat.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Group 2 504 Rally car description-polyester-504.jpg  
    Last edited by Thanos; 13th June 2011 at 02:27 AM.

  22. #22
    Fellow Frogger! 908HDI's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    Gold Coast, Australia
    Posts
    380

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Thanos View Post
    This thread is about GROUP 2 504 RALLY CARS. This makes it quite specific to the FIA homologated 504 Berline. (Perhaps you can start a new thread on the 504’s in the Dakar raid, I am sure it will be very interesting.) Future readers going through this thread will have to wade through, counting this one, EIGHT posts with useless to them information. Not wanting to add to that count, this will be my last post on this exchange, but courtesy dictates that I respond to your questions.


    True, but “Dangel” is the defining word here and you now mention it for the first time. From your earlier post:

    Minor detail, there is nothing “stock” about a Dangel and they were not available in Peugeot showrooms. They are very heavily modified vehicles referred to as “Dangel 504 wagon” and “Dangel 504 pick up” so the statement is certainly misleading. I wonder how many of the 500 or so readers thought “Dangel” as soon as they read your post.


    I am curious as to your source for that statement.


    Actually, it did not mean homologation in ANY case, there were no homologation requirements for raids.



    If you look up the period entry regulations, you will be very surprised by how much was left up to the entrant.



    It did, but it was not this damage per se that stranded them. They stopped to repair a broken steering arm, they were subsequently lost and eventually stranded after suffering the damage that Uffee described and a broken driveshaft casing.



    Somehow your two statements are at odds...


    There is no more Paris-Dakar. It is now called the Dakar and is held in Latin America.


    But we should, the point of this form is to “share the knowledge”, not share a best guess or whatever…

    To bring this back to group 2 rally cars: Mark Thatcher’s co-driver was Anny Charlotte Veney, a ten-time Le Mans driver and member of Robert Neyret’s all-girl Aseptogyl team. Neyret, a dentist and rally driver himself, used women drivers and pink cars to promote Aseptogyl, his proprietary toothpaste. Veney’s results were unremarkable, but the team also included the notable African 504 driver Christine Dacremont. Neyret drove an all-polyester “Team Aseptogyl” 504 (pictured below) weighing well under 1000 kilos in the 1974 Bandama rally. This is very important information for FIA competitors: It provides precedent for replacing any and all steel body panels with polyester and significantly improving the power to weight ratio. The rules clearly state that all modifications used in sanctioned competitions of a historic car's competition period (FIA category I, II or III) are grandfathered in, even if they are not included in the homologation documents.
    Bob is still active, a bit slower, but by all accounts fast enough for many younger challengers. He recently competed in the Rallye du Maroc and the regularity leg of the historic Acropolis with a chopped-tail Safari-replica DS built by Daunat.

    Oh Dear......

    This will also be my last reply to what is now becoming a bit comical.

    Thanos, You have expanded greatly and beyond proportion to what was a side line comment to the original post.

    Thank you for spending some time on the internet looking at all the above in detail and posting that information which I obviously did not on this occassion.
    I could, if so desired, post a whole chapter on the matter by simpy cutting, pasting and editing from the web, but at the end of the day that is all the above information is, nothing more.

    You also stated that "There was no Homologation" and the fact of the matter is that in 1982 there was a 504 Pick Up that was homologated.

    Like I said, sometimes we all forget to cross the t's and dot the i's.


    Any thoughts to why the original article reffred to a 202 engine ? My "Thoughts" and "Opinion" are that they must have been reffering to a 402. Hopefully this will put us back onto the main thread...

  23. #23
    VIP Sponsor
    Join Date
    Aug 2000
    Posts
    9,474

    Default

    Any thoughts to why the original article reffred to a 202 engine ? My "Thoughts" and "Opinion" are that they must have been reffering to a 402. Hopefully this will put us back onto the main thread...[/QUOTE]

    For gods sake people, NOTHING to do with any ancient museum pieces such as a 402 engine!
    Just a reference to who knows what, but not an engine from a prewar car.
    In reference to the other discussion maybe start another Dakar thread, nothing to do with homolgated cars the article was about.
    The Utes were homolgated for the African Championship, no need for the Dakar.
    The ute won the championship (driven by David Horsey, who also drove a 504 sedan in the 1993 London Sydney marathon 25 Anniversary, I met him in Wangaratta) in 1984 with this car, in 1983 the 505 STi won.
    I wonder who bought the 200 cars required to be built for Group B?
    In theory there should be a lot of Grp 2 works engines about!
    Graham

  24. #24
    mlb
    mlb is offline
    Voted Most Popular mlb's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Devonport, Tasmania
    Posts
    1,103

    Default

    You may find 202 is an internally used number to identify the engine, which has no bearing to car models or commonly used engine designations.

    For example the ZEJ engine was also referred to as the 829, and the XN1 as the 106. Maybe the answer lies buried in factory Peugeot documentation somewhere.

    Matt
    Fight for your opinions, but do not believe that they contain the whole truth, or the only truth.

  25. #25
    Fellow Frogger!
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    Athens, Greece
    Posts
    661

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by mlb View Post
    You may find 202 is an internally used number to identify the engine, which has no bearing to car models or commonly used engine designations.

    For example the ZEJ engine was also referred to as the 829, and the XN1 as the 106. Maybe the answer lies buried in factory Peugeot documentation somewhere.

    Matt
    This makes a lot of sense.

Page 1 of 2 12 Last

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •