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  1. #1
    Fellow Frogger!
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    Default dont trust mechanics

    Ive had a miss in the 505GTI for some time now ( electrics..not the other sort) Took it to a mechanic who replaced the rotor and dissy cap, told me the plugs and ht leads were tested (?) OK and retimed it-- $100+ thank you. Took it to another one and had the injectors cleaned and fuel filter replaced--$100+ thanks who swore the brake booster was leaking so I put in another one What a @#$%^&*() job in a manual GTI! At least I didnt have to pay for the labour--my back is coming good and the abrasions healing up nicely, thanks. I then got the sh*ts with the whole disaster and replaced all the HT leads for about $25--the car is now running sweetly. Thanks to the advice from Hayden of Pugwreck who said that for some reason the 505gti is very prone to this problem.

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  2. #2
    Fellow Frogger!
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    Yeh, had the same advice from Eurocare here in Perth when I bought my 505GTi wagon a few years ago. Opened the bonnet at night, with the engine running, and saw St Elmos Fire all over the place. A multi-meter K/ohm check showed very high resistance in 2 of the leads as well. Replaced them with good quality Bosch ones [your $25 ones sound a bit iffy]. Was also advised to replace the coil as well as the dizzy cap and rotor arm. As a matter of course I also renewed the ignition module -- preventative maintenance when living in the country some 350 ks from a supplier makes one a foreward planner.
    There's been a few other niggles such as the air-con ECU having a mind of it's own and bad lamp earths, but all in all, this Peugeot, the first I've owned, is by far the most enjoyable and relaxing car of the many I've had -- which include Alfa's, Citroens, Jags and Triumphs.

  3. #3
    Fellow Frogger! tomb's Avatar
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    I've got a miss in the 505 GTi, only happens under 2000 rpm and seems to happen more often in colder weather. I asume car must have had this problem before we bought it as the spark leads had been replaced, as well as the distributor cap and rotor, and even the fuel rail had been replaced and injectors cleaned in an attempt to solve it.

    It only happens if you want to get going quickly, if you climb quietly through the revs no problem. Once thru 1900/2000 rpm everythings fine. I've have always suspected it was a fuel pick up problem. I have replaced the fuel filter but yet to inspect the fuel pick up in the tank. I may as well test the leads with an ohm meter but I assume if the problem was electronic it would be there all the time.

  4. #4
    1000+ Posts Gamma's Avatar
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by tomb View Post
    I've got a miss in the 505 GTi, only happens under 2000 rpm and seems to happen more often in colder weather. I asume car must have had this problem before we bought it as the spark leads had been replaced, as well as the distributor cap and rotor, and even the fuel rail had been replaced and injectors cleaned in an attempt to solve it.

    It only happens if you want to get going quickly, if you climb quietly through the revs no problem. Once thru 1900/2000 rpm everythings fine. I've have always suspected it was a fuel pick up problem. I have replaced the fuel filter but yet to inspect the fuel pick up in the tank. I may as well test the leads with an ohm meter but I assume if the problem was electronic it would be there all the time.
    Fuel pick up problems tend to get worse with higher engine running speeds, (fuel starvation).

    Check how many fuel pumps you have, (86 and on have only one). Make sure they are working as they should.
    Do not discount the possibility that you have clogged up the new fuel filter. (remove and back-swill to see how much [email protected] comes out).
    Now check the fuel tank breather, (run with an emergency fuel cap with a 6mm hole and see if that makes a difference).
    (these are less likley problems).


    See if you have an vacuum advance delay device on the manifold line ot the dizzy, (remove it.....), (also check to see if the line is intact and plugged into the correct spigot, (your symptoms are typical of this fault). (no vacuume advance can be checked with a timing light....open up the throttle and you should see the mark move and then recover to the rev set advance position....it moves when you rev it).

    You could be too far retarded too.....No offence....

    But, as any 505GTI owner knows.....AIR LEAKS...AIR LEAKS....AIR LEAKS. (my guess).

    Take off and inspect all inlet hoses and accessory lines, (one at a time, being careful to put it back like you found it...trust me on this one.....photos....photos...photos......).
    /// 1986 SII 505 GTI
    2003 T5 307 HDI
    2013 LandRover90
    Sacred cows make the best hamburger mince.
    If you run, you only die tired

  5. #5
    Fellow Frogger! tomb's Avatar
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    Thanks John very precise. So unlikely to be fuel pick up. I did check the old fuel filter, there was no problems with it but it had been on for 60thou klm so was happy to change it.

    Have checked for air leaks in the past and have replaced that large hose after the AFM a long time ago. Would assume that the problem would persist thru the rev range with this also.

    The vaccum delay device was suspected but don't think it is there, but will investigate this further. Spark plug leads still a possibilty but the problem would be more persistant also.

    Thanks again.

  6. #6
    Fellow Frogger!
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    One other thing to check are the spark plugs. On older engines with many Ks under the belt the standard recommended plug is a bit too cold to burn off oil residues at low revs -- which equates to lower temps. You might like to try a grade hotter.
    As well, the ends of the brake booster hose can become hard and brittle and not seal properly. In this instance I've found a smear of silicon gasket cement stops any leaks.

  7. #7
    1000+ Posts Beano's Avatar
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    Check or just replace the spark plug insulators. There are various types, and the bakelite doesn't last for ever.
    Last edited by Beano; 22nd May 2011 at 06:49 PM.

  8. #8
    Fellow Frogger!
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    I think you'll find that good quality leads come with silicon rubber plug covers already fitted. Not sure about el cheapos though.
    Pavel

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