406 Oxy sensor
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Thread: 406 Oxy sensor

  1. #1
    Demannu-facturing! Demannu's Avatar
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    Default 406 Oxy sensor

    In the past few weeks the fuel consumption of the Coupe had deteriorated to an unacceptable level. Within seconds of starting the car in the garage the whole garage was filled with fumes that made your eyes water uncontrollably.

    The car has 196,000km on the clock. Bosch recommends replacement of the oxy sensor every 100,000km. Combined with a recent coilpack failure, I decided it was about time I replaced it.

    And what a difference it has made! It will take some time to prove that the consumption has improved, but the improved throttle response is amazing! No more flat spots and a crisp exhaust note once again.

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    The original sensor had a build date stamped on it of 9/97, and the car is 3/98, so it seems a safe deduction that it was the original sensor.

    It has even been doing some 'unusual' gearchanges recently, but the engine just seems to be 'matched' with the gearbox again and now it is as smooth as silk.

    So if your 406 V6 is using more fuel than the good old days, or doesn't quite have the pep that it once did, this could be the answer!
    Scotty

    Melbourne - Dandenong Ranges

    1956 Peugeot 403 - 'Francois' - resto project

    1969 Peugeot 504 - 'Pascal' - daily driver project

    1970 Peugeot 404 Utility - 'Brutus' - resto project

    1978 Peugeot 604 - as yet unnamed - V6 on straight LPG

    1987 Peugeot 505 - as yet unnamed - project car

    1999 Peugeot 406 Coupé - 'Chloe' - 5 speed manual

    2011 Peugeot 3008 XTE HDi - 'Zoe' - hatchback on steroids

    2014 Peugeot RCZ - 'Remy'

    1999 Range Rover 4.6 HSE - 'Grover' - tow car

  2. #2
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    It sounds like I should do the oxy sensor on the 306. It's done 210,000 km and now occasionally stalls at the lights, AND the fuel consumption is nothing to write home about!
    1998 Peugeot 406 D8SV Manual
    1999 Peugeot 406 D8ST Auto
    2002 Peugeot 406 D9SV Manual
    1994 Peuegot 306 N3 Cabriolet Manual
    1994 Peugeot 306 XR N3 Hatch
    1995 Peugeot 505 GTI executive
    1976 Peugeot 504 Sedan - Now sold

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  3. #3
    Tadpole
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    I bought a 4wire sensor without a plug on ebay from the UK - about $45 posted to Oz. It resolved the ECU fault code and improved the economy out of sight.

    If in doubt and it is ancient, replace the oxygen sensor

  4. #4
    Sans Pond. STALLED's Avatar
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    If you have a copy of Lexia, you can see if the o2 sensor is running within parameters...

    Mine's fine after 190k!

    2005 Renault Clio 182 Cup

    2011 Renault Megane 250 Cup Trophee - Sold

    1997 Peugeot 406 2.0 Manual - On Loan

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  5. #5
    Demannu-facturing! Demannu's Avatar
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    Ahh yes, but you have no way of knowing if the signal actually correlates to the correct air/fuel ratio. All Lexia will tell you is that there is a voltage coming from the O2 sensor that is within it's normal operating range.

    From the Bosch website:

    When does an Oxygen Sensor need to be replaced?
    Exposure to carbon, soot, harmful gases, anti-freeze, chemicals plus thermal and physical shock will shorten the life of an Oxygen Sensor. This results in increased fuel consumption, poor engine performance and excessive exhaust emissions.
    That’s why checking for and replacing a worn out Oxygen Sensor is an important part of every routine service.
    Oxygen Sensors with 1 or 2 wires typically have a service life of 50,000kms. While 3 and 4 wire sensors have a service life of approximately 100,000kms.
    Scotty

    Melbourne - Dandenong Ranges

    1956 Peugeot 403 - 'Francois' - resto project

    1969 Peugeot 504 - 'Pascal' - daily driver project

    1970 Peugeot 404 Utility - 'Brutus' - resto project

    1978 Peugeot 604 - as yet unnamed - V6 on straight LPG

    1987 Peugeot 505 - as yet unnamed - project car

    1999 Peugeot 406 Coupé - 'Chloe' - 5 speed manual

    2011 Peugeot 3008 XTE HDi - 'Zoe' - hatchback on steroids

    2014 Peugeot RCZ - 'Remy'

    1999 Range Rover 4.6 HSE - 'Grover' - tow car

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by pugnut1 View Post
    It sounds like I should do the oxy sensor on the 306. It's done 210,000 km and now occasionally stalls at the lights, AND the fuel consumption is nothing to write home about!
    It's always made a big difference when I've replaced O2 sensors on my 205 Sis.
    Graham

  7. #7
    Member davo8's Avatar
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    What sort of money are we talking here? Where is this particular O2 sensor and Is it easy to replace yourself?
    Thanks Davo

  8. #8
    Demannu-facturing! Demannu's Avatar
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    I was quoted everywhere from $125 for a universal 4 wire sensor up to $400 for the direct-fit replacement.

    I went for the cheapest universal Bosch option. It is a form and function fit for the original item except for the connector. The Bosch universal ones come with a joiner system to connect to the original wiring using the retained connector from the old sensor.

    Oxygen sensors are in the exhaust system, as close as possible to the engine to avoid heat loss and to promote quick heating of the sensing element. They are fitted before the catalytic converter. Since the introduction of Euro IV emissions controls, many cars have a sensor before and another after the catalytic converter.

    On the coupe, it is quite accessible just behind the engine crossmember. You will need a 22mm ring spanner to undo it, and some basic electrical hand tools to connect the sensor.

    The Bosch universal sensors come with fairly comprehensive instructions. But I cannot stress enough how important it is to keep everything perfectly clean when you're doing the wiring. Under NO CIRCUMSTANCES should you solder it!!!!!!

    It's been nearly a week since I changed it, we were getting about 400 to a tank of fuel, we've this week done 300km and only used just over quarter of a tank. What a difference!!
    Scotty

    Melbourne - Dandenong Ranges

    1956 Peugeot 403 - 'Francois' - resto project

    1969 Peugeot 504 - 'Pascal' - daily driver project

    1970 Peugeot 404 Utility - 'Brutus' - resto project

    1978 Peugeot 604 - as yet unnamed - V6 on straight LPG

    1987 Peugeot 505 - as yet unnamed - project car

    1999 Peugeot 406 Coupé - 'Chloe' - 5 speed manual

    2011 Peugeot 3008 XTE HDi - 'Zoe' - hatchback on steroids

    2014 Peugeot RCZ - 'Remy'

    1999 Range Rover 4.6 HSE - 'Grover' - tow car

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