Is it safe to wash 505 EFI engine with Pressurised Water?
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  1. #1
    Fellow Frogger! Ikenna351's Avatar
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    Default Is it safe to wash 505 EFI engine with Pressurised Water?

    Please, is it safe to wash EFI (505) engine bay with pressurised water? Some have complained that their Alternators and other electricals became malfunctional after such washing

    Ikenna.

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    Last edited by Ikenna351; 7th January 2011 at 05:20 AM.

  2. #2
    Fellow Frogger! James S's Avatar
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    Default Washing engine bay

    Hi Ikenna,

    Yes, I've done it a number of times. Just keep the water away from the electrical bits. I've cleaned up the bottom and side of the motor and engine bay without any problems. Keep the water below the level of the manifolds and you should be OK.

    James

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    Fellow Frogger! Ikenna351's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by James S View Post
    Hi Ikenna,

    Yes, I've done it a number of times. Just keep the water away from the electrical bits. I've cleaned up the bottom and side of the motor and engine bay without any problems. Keep the water below the level of the manifolds and you should be OK.

    James

    When you said electrical bits, you mean the alternator, coil & distributor cap? What about sensors scattered all over the engine? The point is a colleague of mine washed his 1993 Lexus engine bay and he started having alternator problem weeks later. He even said this wasnt the first time it has happened, each time he washed his engine bay. Am just scared of creating problem for myself.

    Ikenna.

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    Fellow Frogger! James S's Avatar
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    Default Electricals

    Yes, keep the water away from the alternator, distributor and coil. I've never worried too much about sensors as on my cars (e.g. 505 STI and GTI), as the only sensors that are going to get wet are the simple type that screw into the block say, and have a single wire attached.

    Cleaning the underside (sump, bottom of block, bottom of bellhousing, gearbox, underside of floor) and other bits such as the lower part of the timing belt/chain cover, power steering pump, steering rack, side panels of the engine bay and air conditioning compressor can be done without a drama. Sometimes I have left the motor running so that I don't have any starting problems later, as I once had with a 504 as I wasn't careful enough with the water and I chugged home. Another thing you can do is cover the electrical components with plastic bags so that any stray water won't cause a problem.

    When I do oil changes, I usually degrease and wash the motor and other bits of my 405 sedan with a can of spray degreaser and the hose to wash it off.

  5. #5
    1000+ Posts HONG KONG PUGGY's Avatar
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    It is safe but beware that high pressure water and older engine paints don't usually mix well.
    I stripped the paint off the sump and tappet cover of my R17 years ago in preparation for painting with high pressure water.
    For the painted bits, some spray degreaser and a hose with a pressure nozzle will be good enough. I've got a couple here I bought from the local hardware store. They just connect to any normal household hose connector.
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    You'll get better results with a strong degreaser, low pressure water and some brushes & elbow grease.
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    Fellow Frogger! Doush_504's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by James S View Post
    Yes, keep the water away from the alternator, distributor and coil. I've never worried too much about sensors as on my cars (e.g. 505 STI and GTI), as the only sensors that are going to get wet are the simple type that screw into the block say, and have a single wire attached.

    Another thing you can do is cover the electrical components with plastic bags so that any stray water won't cause a problem.

    When I do oil changes, I usually degrease and wash the motor and other bits of my 405 sedan with a can of spray degreaser and the hose to wash it off.
    I usually cover the alternator, distributor and electronic ignition stuff (Coil + Module) and I take care not to get water over the spark plugs (or as little as possible).
    After I finish and remove the plastic bags, when I find the covered parts dry, I know I have succeeded.
    Also concentrate on dirty/oily parts of the engine and don't wash parts that are clean; meaning: for example the fusebox is always clean, so why spray water on it ? a rag will remove any dirt and that's it, no need for water.
    So based on the previous point, I would recommend that you do the washing and not some guy at a service station because you will be more careful and know what exactly it is you need to clean.
    Finally, dry the engine using an air compressor (water can accumulate at some parts causing rust) and then take the car for a good spin to get the engine hot for some time (helps drying).
    Hope it helps
    Last edited by Doush_504; 8th January 2011 at 09:33 AM.
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  8. #8
    Fellow Frogger! Ikenna351's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Doush_504 View Post
    I usually cover the alternator, distributor and electronic ignition stuff (Coil + Module) and I take care not to get water over the spark plugs (or as little as possible).
    After I finish and remove the plastic bags and find the covered parts dry, I know I have succeeded.
    Also concentrate on dirty/oily parts of the engine and don't wash parts that are clean; meaning: for example the fusebox is always clean, so why spray water on it ? a rag will remove any dirt and that's it, no need for water.
    So based on the previous point, I would recommend that you do the washing and not some guy at a service station because you will be more careful and know what exactly it is you need to clean.
    Finally, dry the engine using an air compressor (water can accumulate at some parts causing rust) and then take the car for a good spin to get the engine hot for some time (helps drying).
    Hope it helps
    Yes, it helps. Thanks all.

    Ikenna.

  9. #9
    1000+ Posts Gamma's Avatar
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    Buy a bulk box of 5-STAR degreaser form your local friendly auto parts place, ($2 per can max).
    Each service have a spray at the bigger crusty/oily bits and use a pump-up squirty bottle with plain water to remove.
    If its bad a little bit at a time will eventually get it off.

    Try to avoid high pressure cleaners and agressive chemicals.
    Sill be careful and avoid filling vairious components with water and gooooo.
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    1000+ Posts catshamlet's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gamma View Post
    .
    Sill be careful and avoid filling vairious components with water and gooooo.
    .............
    Started out with nothing, still got most of it left.

  11. #11
    1000+ Posts jo proffi's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gamma View Post
    Try to avoid high pressure cleaners......
    They have their place. Like any power tool, having a knack will yield better results.
    If the car has never been cleaned, there might be 10mm of built up oil and dirt caked on to the chassis and lower engine parts. Its nuts to try and remove this by hand with low pressure water

    IF you know what you are doing with a pressure cleaner and use it eficiently they end up putting a lot less water through the bay.

    For instance my pressure cleaner can blow dry leaves of the driveway with the air pressure blast without wetting the drive, and when i make just one pass of the rocker cover on wide fan, it will be enough to blast the gunk everywhere else and leave the cover spicko.
    I now have a clean rocker cover and not a drop has dropped down to the alternator.
    The best point to start hand detailing of the bay is after a complete blast down or else you end up with too much muck on your rags. and you just rub it in.
    Sometimes soot will sit on the alloy casting but not really adhere until you smudge it in with a rag. This is the stuff thats also good to remove with the blaster.


    Jo

  12. #12
    Real cars have hydraulics DoubleChevron's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gamma View Post
    Buy a bulk box of 5-STAR degreaser form your local friendly auto parts place, ($2 per can max).
    Each service have a spray at the bigger crusty/oily bits and use a pump-up squirty bottle with plain water to remove.
    If its bad a little bit at a time will eventually get it off.

    Try to avoid high pressure cleaners and agressive chemicals.
    Sill be careful and avoid filling vairious components with water and gooooo.
    I've found export degreaser is the best of them by far (you can get it really cheap when it's on special at supercheap). If you have a car with fragile electrics I wouldn't hose under the bonnet (ie: just about every aging Citroen ). I'm sure the 505 will be ok, I just put supermarket bags over the alternator and dizzie (or coils if it has twin coils). You will usually end up with water down the plug holes .... I don't worry to much about this. If you don't have compressed air available to blast the water out, just whip the plug out ... the water will drain into the bore..... then when you crank the motor it'll be blasted back out under about 180psi of pressure. Make sure no-ones head is under the bonnet when you do this Like Jo I'm happy to use a pressure washer, you use a "fan" type wand on it and just move further away if you near something that you don't want water logged.

    My CX didn't run for weeks after I pressure washed it the first time..... I have spent literally weeks on it tidying up all the dodgy electrical connections since then though.

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  13. #13
    1000+ Posts Gamma's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jo proffi View Post
    They have their place. Like any power tool, having a knack will yield better results.
    If the car has never been cleaned, there might be 10mm of built up oil and dirt caked on to the chassis and lower engine parts. Its nuts to try and remove this by hand with low pressure water

    IF you know what you are doing with a pressure cleaner and use it eficiently they end up putting a lot less water through the bay.

    For instance my pressure cleaner can blow dry leaves of the driveway with the air pressure blast without wetting the drive, and when i make just one pass of the rocker cover on wide fan, it will be enough to blast the gunk everywhere else and leave the cover spicko.
    I now have a clean rocker cover and not a drop has dropped down to the alternator.
    The best point to start hand detailing of the bay is after a complete blast down or else you end up with too much muck on your rags. and you just rub it in.
    Sometimes soot will sit on the alloy casting but not really adhere until you smudge it in with a rag. This is the stuff thats also good to remove with the blaster.


    Jo
    True enough.

    I take the slowly, slowly, approach.
    I have used a pressure washer with sucess and disaster
    /// 1986 SII 505 GTI
    2003 T5 307 HDI
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