406 gremlins
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Thread: 406 gremlins

  1. #1
    Fellow Frogger! michaelh's Avatar
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    Icon8 406 gremlins

    Hi all,

    I've recently acquired an immaculate one-owner 406 ST which I'm very pleased with. I'm less pleased with the electrical gremlins that seem to plague all modern Peugeots, including this one.

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    The two things that bug me are:

    1. The indicator noise that comes and goes whether or nor the indicators are on, irrespective of whether the engine is running or not. I found a pre-crash thread where Haakon suggested the problem lies with the indicator stalk - can anyone else confirm this before I attempt to pull it off and douse with contact cleaner?

    2. The crazy tacho. It sometimes works, but more often than not it bounces around when first started then settles at about 2300RPM regardless of revs. It seems to work more often when the weather is hot, but this is more of a hunch and has not been empirically tested. Any ideas?

    Cheers,

    Michael
    Current:
    1973 504GL Berline
    1997 406 ST

    Past:
    R19RT; 1979 504GL Berline with Factory Air; S3 205GTi; 206GTi; 505STi; R4

  2. #2
    I might be slow... DRTDVL's Avatar
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    1) http://www.eurosport.org.nz/forum/vi...p?f=157&t=8202

    2) Is dry solder joins on the circuit board - it's very easy to fix just takes a bit of time...

  3. #3
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    I just had this kind of thing where the odometer lights were intermittent and the temp guage kept on heading for infinity although it wasn't overheating. I changed the whole speedo/tacho/guage assembly
    and it's all fine.
    I have to say that the amount of plastic clips that break a little bit every time you touch them are just indicative of the planned obsolescence built into these cars. Go further and you'll find blocks that don't have cooling right around each cylinder because they are too close, non removeable liners with very thin walls that would be unlikely to take a rebore, gudgeons with no retaining circlips, shallow skirted pistons for high revving and light weight and all in all it's not a rebuildable thing. It's a fun machine till it shits itself and then you'll just have to get another one. There'll not be endless rebuild scenarios with these engines I predict, as no mechanic with any sanity would waste their time on it.
    And the body is made with the same philosophy. Bit's break because they are bad plastic and some form of improvisation will be the only solution.
    As I drive mine the trim in the rear creaks as the body flexes. And this one's never had a bingle.

    But I've found one good use for plastic. My recently blown car had a plastic inlet manifold but this motor I've just fitted as a replacement had the alloy one on it, so I left it there.
    However I am tempted to swap them over as I don't quite enjoy the sound of the alloy.

    These engines rev out nicely to over 6500rpm and I loved taking the previous one out to 6000 or a bit more when on windy and hilly terrain. The sound was a warm roar with a sporty purr and it felt really good with heaps of power. Returned good mileage while driven this way and seemed to like the caning.
    But the alloy one sounds harsh and hollow by comparison, more akin to a Renault kinda sound which doesn't give me a hardon. So I find I'm compelled to change at just over 5500rpm on this motor. This doesn't get full use of the power band.
    Seems plastic is good for something eh? Maybe I should just drive it with earplugs.

  4. #4
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    Yep.
    My 155 000km 406 ST DT wagon also has this flex in the body noticeable when going at low speed over uneven surface.
    Yes- the car has a perfect service history with no accidents at any time.
    I like the car (economy, quality ride and good handling, touring capability and ergonomics) but I also have doubts about longevity unlike my trusty old 505 Ser 1 diesel. I hate that. Damn beancounters have had free reign over the engineers resulting in reduced and altered production values. No more 'meat on the bone' as it were- very not peugeot
    more like a damn VW or Hyundai....
    The indicator stalk has also been replaced twice at 21k and at 44k for unclear reasons (receipts in service records). I've had no electrical gremlins since the vehicle has been in my care though....(crossed fingers)

  5. #5
    Fellow Frogger! michaelh's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by DRTDVL View Post
    1) http://www.eurosport.org.nz/forum/vi...p?f=157&t=8202

    2) Is dry solder joins on the circuit board - it's very easy to fix just takes a bit of time...
    100% success for the indicator stalk - a spray of contact cleaner on the relevant switches has cured the problem (for now!).

    Now onto the crazy tacho - can someone talk me through this? I have a soldering iron and solder and am willing to give it a go, but am a total spaz when it comes to electrics.

    Is the circuit board behind the glove box? WHich solder joins should I be looking for?

    Any advice appreciated.

    Michael
    Current:
    1973 504GL Berline
    1997 406 ST

    Past:
    R19RT; 1979 504GL Berline with Factory Air; S3 205GTi; 206GTi; 505STi; R4

  6. #6
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    You have to lever out the trim with the air vents to expose the speedo/tacho unit. You can then unscrew the star headed retaining screws, unclip the electrical connectors and you have the unit free to take to the bench. It's then a matter of removing the back panel with all the little globes and stuff. I haven't taken this off either of my units though so I'll let someone else guide you from here. I simply swapped the whole unit and now everyhing works. Plus it's showing less K's on the odometer.
    But I would imagine you'll simply inspect the rear of the tacho where the circuit board is and attempt to improve on their soldering job. If I ever do this I'll have to use my delicate Weller iron as my big Scope would surely overcook something. I would perhaps suggest you take it to an electronics nerd for this if you aren't used to using the iron.

    I should say that when each trim strip was clipped out there seemed to be a couple of plastic tags that broke, although the best one went back with no apparent damage. The other one had a broken air vent on the right side and neither car came apart nicely there. The manual shows a screwdriver being used to pry this out, wedging against the spongy padding, which is also the way to get the clock out and a few other things.
    It probably depends how much sun the car has sat in as to whether the plastic is too brittle or not.

    Good luck.

  7. #7
    I might be slow... DRTDVL's Avatar
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    Michael - there is a couple guide on the 406 owners club on how to remove the dash. You need to completely disassemble the speed unit which isn't very hard except for a single clip which is a pain to get off.

    I used a cheap Dick Smith solder iron as you don't need to really do that much to the joins, just heat the old solder and plonk some new stuff on, i did it while having a beer and watching deadliest catch.

    Being a pug owner you should have a torx set or torx screwdriver ends which you will need to remove the back housing for the speedo unit.

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