406 Hdi ownership
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Thread: 406 Hdi ownership

  1. #1
    Fellow Frogger!
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    Icon7 406 Hdi ownership

    Hi - am researching the 406 as a possible next purchase. Can anyone describe their ownership experience of the diesel version - manual or auto?

    It seems also that in 2003 some changes were made in terms of trim, alloy wheel size etc, but anything else that represents a plus?

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    Many thanks,

    K

  2. #2
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    Default New 406 HDi Owner

    Bought my first ever Peugeot a few days ago: a 2003 406 D9 ST HDi 2.0 Wagon Auto that has done 85,000 kms. Well, more like 86,000 now, I think.

    Wear and tear:

    • Original CD stacker was replaced by an aftermarket Kenwood
    • Plastic handle for driver's seat tilt comes off
    • Rubber strip on driver's side door sill misses some clips

    Otherwise in good nick for a 7-year old car.

    Fuel consumption:

    • 6.1 L / 100 km for mostly country driving and some town driving

    Driver's manual:

    • A bit short on technical information; e.g. no details on type of fog light bulbs and how to replace them.

    Handling:

    • I'm horrified that I bought a car with McPherson struts. First one ever. Nevertheless, the car handles confidently. Just hate to think what could happen if I hit a pothole.

    Electronics:

    • This level of electronics is another scary first for me. Keeping my trusty 1978 SAAB 99 (120,000 kms) on stand-by, just in case...

    Trim and Accessories:

    • Cloth-covered seats a very big plus! (as compared to leather)
    • No complaints about the number of buttons, switches, dials, displays, and warning lights. Heaps more than in any of my previous cars.

    Hope this information was useful.

  3. #3
    Sans Pond. STALLED's Avatar
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    The manual 110 HDI's have a dual mass flywheel - which can be expensive to replace, if you need to do a clutch!

    Other than that, they seem fairly sturdy from what other people say on the www.406oc.co.uk forum - might be worth posting on there, as the 110 HDI is the majority of what people own over there.

    Electronics should be ok. Usual COM2000 problems, which have seem to be ironed out by now if you have the latter unit, which has been replaced under warranty!

    A nice late model 2003+ HDI would be a nice car, but remember you can get a C5 for similar coin which will be a much newer car

    Cheers,

    Joel
    2005 Renault Clio 182 Cup

    2011 Renault Megane 250 Cup Trophee - Sold

    1997 Peugeot 406 2.0 Manual - On Loan

    2004 Citroen C3 1.4 80th Anniversary (RIP)

  4. #4
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    Icon7

    Thanks for the replies thus far.

    How do you find the on road performance for the Hdi version? Am looking at later 2003 models, so comms issues etc should be resolved.

    Re the flywheel, nay idea of replacement cost & is an after-market unit available as an option? Hopefully, such a failure is very rare!!

    Cheers,
    K

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    Sans Pond. STALLED's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by KIMDEB View Post

    Re the flywheel, nay idea of replacement cost & is an after-market unit available as an option? Hopefully, such a failure is very rare!!

    Cheers,
    K
    Check:

    http://www.eai.net.au/clutchkit2.html
    2005 Renault Clio 182 Cup

    2011 Renault Megane 250 Cup Trophee - Sold

    1997 Peugeot 406 2.0 Manual - On Loan

    2004 Citroen C3 1.4 80th Anniversary (RIP)

  6. #6
    Tadpole
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    Default manual or auto

    You might want to research what auto transmission went into that model. If it's the dreaded AL4 then I would steer clear. Do a search on AL4 in this forum and you will not find many kind words. The manual will give slightly better "standing start" performance too.

  7. #7
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    Icon7

    Thanks again people for the replies & a welcome to Ymer into the A/F forum.

    I have read elsewhere in this forum that Valeo supply an after market flywheel replacement for diesel cars that have an issue with the DMF units. However, as this appears to be a rare event, I would not be concerned by ownership of a diesel manual. We have 307 Hdi Touring 6 speed manual & it is a delight to drive, especially on the big trips.

    Regarding the 406 Hdi manual under consideration, they are a popular vehicle in rural areas for many reasons, not least being the fuel type & economy, durability & reliability.

    Next step will be to drive one.

    Cheers,
    K

  8. #8
    Fellow Frogger! michaelh's Avatar
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    Handling:

    • I'm horrified that I bought a car with McPherson struts. First one ever. Nevertheless, the car handles confidently. Just hate to think what could happen if I hit a pothole.


    Given that the 406 was, at the time, described by motoring journos as the ride and handling benchmark, this comment seems a little odd. Peugeots have for many years had McPherson struts upfront and have made some of the best riding and handling cars up until recently.

    Could you please explain why you're so horrified to have bought a car with McPherson struts? Are there any affordable cars made these days with double wishbones?
    Current:
    1973 504GL Berline
    1997 406 ST

    Past:
    R19RT; 1979 504GL Berline with Factory Air; S3 205GTi; 206GTi; 505STi; R4

  9. #9
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    Maybe comes from the days of Zephrs where the strut was held in place by not much more than a piece of wire (as the radius rod) and a severe pothole caused it to fold under the guard.

    I can assure you modern cars with struts can take serious treatment, having rallied them for 30 years.

    Cheers

    Jim
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  10. #10
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    Default 406 HDi economy

    Went Melbourne to Brisbane and back in the my 'new' 2003 HDi 406 (D9) sedan with 150000+ on the clock recently. This is my first HDi diesel after my first exposure to a Peugeot diesel via a 405 SRDT earlier this year which impressed me so much I bought a 406 for my wife.

    I was so disappointed that I needed to stop at all and refuel along the way. What's the world coming to when you need to refuel your car all the time. Got to Coffs Harbour when the mongrel needed a drink. Zipped up to Brisbane (home town); across to Straddie for two weeks; back to Brisbane; down to Grafton then up the range to Glen Innes. Then the mongrel wanted a second drink at Glen Innes (cheapest fuel ever at $1.21 and "did I have a Mobil discount card"/No! Why are we being ripped off in Melbourne???).

    Took the attached piccie on the way back (already had 191 kms on the clock at the time).
    Sheeeesh! Talk about refusing to suck the fuel (is this car anhorexic or what??)- had to fork out nearly $240 in diesel for whole trip - that's around 3 tanksfull. And, NO! I'm wasn't crawling along but I did sit under the freeway speeds by punting along at 105 kph with B-Doubles whipping past at 120kph and sat on the 100kph on the Newell Highway.

    I don't want to tell you what it used to cost me in the 505 wagon (lovely to drive though) - which was why it was cheaper to fly the family up than drive up.

    What can I say: I'm never buying another petrol engined car again!!!!!!! I am still keeping the 1980 504 wagon (my Sportz Car/ Babe Magnet - please don't laugh and allow an old man his delusional fantasy) for a little while yet but the 505 may have to go - it's petrol you see.

    TA
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails 406 Hdi ownership-406-hdi-wb.jpg  
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    Quote Originally Posted by terraaustralis View Post
    Took the attached piccie on the way back (already had 191 kms on the clock at the time).
    Yours is a manual, I suppose?

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    Default Not so horrified

    Quote Originally Posted by michaelh View Post
    Could you please explain why you're so horrified to have bought a car with McPherson struts?
    Mostly stories about snapping struts and driving less-than-impressive strutted rentals.

    Quote Originally Posted by michaelh View Post
    Are there any affordable cars made these days with double wishbones?
    Certainly. The Ssangyongs. (Can they be called cars?) But their steering is incredibly vague.

    Oh, and I do like the handling of the 406. If a car can make the grade at 100+ km/h on a ball-bearing-gravel road, I'm happy. And the 406 does. So I am.

  13. #13
    pur-john, not pew-john! peujohn's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ymer View Post
    This level of electronics is another scary first for me. Keeping my trusty 1978 SAAB 99 (120,000 kms) on stand-by, just in case...
    Tell us more about the 99 please! Pics too if you don't mind. I quite like the 99.
    John W

    1979 Peugeot 504 GTI 2.2 litre 5 speed - 72 kW at the wheels

    1974 Peugeot 504 TI
    - now on the road

    2009 Peugeot 407 HDI wagon - family car

    Previous: 2005 407 HDI manual sedan, 1980 504 GL, 1990 405 Mi16, 1977 504 GL Special, 1984 505 SRD Turbo



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    Quote Originally Posted by KIMDEB View Post
    Thanks for the replies thus far.

    How do you find the on road performance for the Hdi version? Am looking at later 2003 models, so comms issues etc should be resolved.

    Cheers,
    K
    I had one of the last 406 HDi's sold in Oz. delivered june 2004 (seen regularly in banner at top of page..rego YFH33R)

    I had Com2000 problems.. the indicaters going on LHS when coming out of Rh turn.
    Check before you buy especially when coming out of RH turn quickly.

    Apart from that it was a beautiful touring car but I found it a bit slow off at the lights. Had thought of putting in aftermarket performance chip but didnt get around to it before car was stolen and burnt out

    Decca
    Present --2016 2008Outdoor / 2014 RAV4 Diesel (My utilitarian beast, now with A/T tyres...)

    Past -- 19?? 403 / 1974 504GL / 1972 R12TL / 1995 405SRi / 1997 406ST / 1998 306XT / 2004 406HD1 / 2008 308XSE HDi / 2008 307XSE

  15. #15
    WLB
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    Hi Kim,

    Whatever you do, don't buy a D8 2.1L diesel unless someone has already replaced the semi-electronic Lucas injector pump with a mechanical Bosch pump from a 405.

    We used to have several long and detailed treads on the trials and tribulations of owning one - a couple of threads being mine. Unfortunately they evaporated when that moron in the US pushed the delete button.

    Good luck with your search.
    Warwick



    And as for MacPherson struts versus double wishbones; as someone has already pointed out, it's all in the design.

    I'm always amused by the industry's trumpeting of double wishbone suspension as the latest thing and the implied superior qualities. Holdens had double wishbone suspension for years. The FJ and HR were appalling handlers - not to mention any in between.

    If no expense was spared in the use of lightweight metals, and it was only used on good roads, a non-independent beam axle system would perform very well because it holds the wheels perpendicular to the road at all times.

    It's all a matter of design, application and the environment where it is used.

  16. #16
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    [QUOTE=WLB;915302]Hi Kim,

    Whatever you do, don't buy a D8 2.1L diesel unless someone has already replaced the semi-electronic Lucas injector pump with a mechanical Bosch pump from a 405.

    We used to have several long and detailed treads on the trials and tribulations of owning one - a couple of threads being mine. Unfortunately they evaporated when that moron in the US pushed the delete button.

    Good luck with your search.
    Warwick



    Hi Warwick & other A/Fers,

    Many thanks for all the replies & opinions.

    Overall, I have always known they were a great car - just need to get over comparisons with my 505 GTi S2 in regard to driving enjoyment, handling etc.

    The prospect of more modern goodies, better airconditioning, etc etc will probably win out in the end. A few tales of auto-trans issues have increased the research vigilance, but I believe regular transmission servicing can overcome this problem, as with most mechanical things.

    Cheers,

    K

  17. #17
    WLB
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    Kim,

    With the benefit of hindsight, I'd swap a 406 for a good 505 in an instant.

    Warwick

  18. #18
    Gus
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    Quote Originally Posted by WLB View Post
    With the benefit of hindsight, I'd swap a 406 for a good 505 in an instant.
    To give an alternative opinion, I wouldn't. I've had a 2003 model 406 HDi for just over a year now, and I've owned various 505s (STI, GTI (series 1 & 2), SRDT) over the years.

    I love 505s, and it's easy to wax nostalgic, but even the newest, lowest-kilometer, 505 model is 20 years old now and lots of things have changed in that time. Not to mention just age, wear and tear.

    "Spirited driving" of a 505 GTI manual is certainly more fun, but I know which car I'd rather drive day to day. I find the 406 more comfortable, quieter, safer, more convenient, and it has less crummy plastic in the interior. Not to mention insanely great fuel economy, as previously mentioned.

    Those dual mass flywheel prices are certainly sobering, though. Less scary than for a similar era Merc, though.

  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gus View Post
    To give an alternative opinion, I wouldn't. I've had a 2003 model 406 HDi for just over a year now, and I've owned various 505s (STI, GTI (series 1 & 2), SRDT) over the years.

    I love 505s, and it's easy to wax nostalgic, but even the newest, lowest-kilometer, 505 model is 20 years old now and lots of things have changed in that time. Not to mention just age, wear and tear.

    "Spirited driving" of a 505 GTI manual is certainly more fun, but I know which car I'd rather drive day to day. I find the 406 more comfortable, quieter, safer, more convenient, and it has less crummy plastic in the interior. Not to mention insanely great fuel economy, as previously mentioned.

    Those dual mass flywheel prices are certainly sobering, though. Less scary than for a similar era Merc, though.
    Thank you again people,

    Have decided to include the SV version of the 406 in my calculations as well, as the economy is very reasonable for a V6; not to mention the extra features.

    Cheers,
    K

  20. #20
    WLB
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gus View Post
    To give an alternative opinion, I wouldn't. I've had a 2003 model 406 HDi for just over a year now, and I've owned various 505s (STI, GTI (series 1 & 2), SRDT) over the years.

    I love 505s, and it's easy to wax nostalgic, but even the newest, lowest-kilometer, 505 model is 20 years old now and lots of things have changed in that time. Not to mention just age, wear and tear.

    "Spirited driving" of a 505 GTI manual is certainly more fun, but I know which car I'd rather drive day to day. I find the 406 more comfortable, quieter, safer, more convenient, and it has less crummy plastic in the interior. Not to mention insanely great fuel economy, as previously mentioned.
    No rose-coloured glasses here Gus. My 505 and 406 ownership overlapped by a few years. I find they have better seats and more interior room. I enjoy driving them more. True they are now very old but they are also very repairable, unlike the 406 which is a throwaway car like most other more modern cars. You would never contemplate rebuilding a 406 engine.

    The Series 1 505 had a neatly designed plastic interior. It's the Series 2 that has the crumby plastic dash.

    I've owned two 1983 SRDT 5-speed manuals and a Series 2 1985 GTI auto. Now I have one of the '83 cars back again and can't wait to get it back on the road after a full restoration - not that it needs much besides paint and a clutch.

  21. #21
    Gus
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    Quote Originally Posted by WLB View Post
    I find they have better seats and more interior room. I enjoy driving them more.
    I agree with you entirely on the interior room - larger car, less safety features and other gizmos to take up room. Your 505s must be a lot newer than any I've ever owned, though, the driver's seat was always sagged out on mine and the rear seats on the early models always disintegrated and ripped across the top. .

    Quote Originally Posted by WLB View Post
    You would never contemplate rebuilding a 406 engine.
    I wonder if this will continue to be true. I suspect noone rebuilds a 406 engine at the moment because they're still quite new and most are still good. Even after a catastrophic failure you'd just look for a replacement from a crashed car. It was probably a similar story with a 505 GTI in, say, 1992. In 10 years, if anyone still drives 406s, then the story may be a little different.
    Last edited by Gus; 27th December 2010 at 06:11 PM.

  22. #22
    Tadpole
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gus View Post
    I suspect noone rebuilds a 406 engine at the moment because they're still quite new and most are still good. Even after a catastrophic failure you'd just look for a replacement from a crashed car.
    Interesting - I *was* considering find a decent mechanic (I struggle to find bonnet release) to stuff some horses back into my 406 HDi which now has 190,000 on the clock. There's no major issues, it's just slow.
    Should I not bother and just live with it?
    My comparison for "slow" is a 2006 VW diesel with a 1.9 which also puts out 240Nm, but admittedly has a much smaller body to lug than the Pug's 7-seater.

    2002 406 D9 HDi 2.0 7-seat 5-sp wagon

  23. #23
    Gus
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    Quote Originally Posted by timreverb View Post
    Interesting - I *was* considering find a decent mechanic (I struggle to find bonnet release) to stuff some horses back into my 406 HDi which now has 190,000 on the clock. There's no major issues, it's just slow.
    Should I not bother and just live with it?
    Interesting question, Tim. When I said "still good" I meant most of these motors are not yet in need of full rebuilds - ie I think still decent compression, lowish oil consumption, etc.

    There's probably things that can be done in terms of tuneups that are not full rebuilds or engine replacements, though. This could range from blocked filters (easy servicing issue) to injectors needing servicing (more complex) to a shagged out turbo needing replacement (wallet surgery.)

    I know when I got mine (with 200,000km) it was a country car and both the radiator and intercooler were jammed tight with dead bugs. Just cleaning the intercooler improved the fuel economy and "seat-o-pants-ometer" when driving around town. I have no idea what else may be running poorly in mine, hopefully nothing.

  24. #24
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    My 406 HDi died on NYE - Bosch mechanical fuel pump, I was told just 45 minutes ago.

    I drove my 1983 505 familiale (manual) yesterday. I enjoyed driving it. I like the seats. I missed the creature comforts!

    Both are great cars to drive.

    Cheers,
    Andrew

    PS Anyone have a good, working Bosch pump they want to dispose of?
    Last edited by 505604; 5th January 2011 at 09:50 AM.

  25. #25
    Tadpole
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    Default 406 HDi ownership

    I've owned two HDi's, the first being a 2001 manual and the current one is a 2003 auto. The current one has just turned 144000 ks and on a trip to the top of the North Island over New Year, it returned 6.0 litres per 100 ks. Around Auckland I manage arround 8 litres/100 ks.

    The only problems I have experienced was solenoids in the gearbox which were replaced a few months back. Since then the gearbox has been much better than I recall, with (for Peugeot), nice smooth shifts. Whilst I cannot say I love the gearbox, I have grown accustomed to it's funny ways and am now quite used to it. Acceleration from a standing start is better with the auto than the manual, which means getting across busy intersections etc is just that bit easier/safer.

    The other problem was the alternator clutch which failed also a couple of months back. Faced with a fairly hefty bill to replace the whole alternator, my local mechanic managed to find the clutch unit and rplaced just that, hence saving me a lot of money.

    I haven't had any electrical problems, the air con works fine, the auto wipers have a mind of their own but again it is someting you get accustomed to.

    I have just bought a 2003 406 manual coupe and within the first month of ownership I am having to replace the coils---ouch!!!--so the HDi with it's reliability and unburstable engine is maybe the one for me to keep rather than sell!!

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