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  1. #1
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    Default Newbie/Convert/defector - take your pick <smile>

    Hi everyone,

    To the Peugeot-philes, I have recently come across from the Citroen forum, having traded my C5 for a 308 Sportium Touring with 1.6litre turbo petrol.

    A couple of members on the neighboring forum asked to know my thoughts, and having just returned from Adelaide to my home of Eltham, I can offer the following in summary:

    Verdict: if rioting students tipped it upside down and set fire to it, I would go and buy another after wreaking my terrible vengeance on them all. I'd consider competitors for a few seconds, then harass Peugeot dealerships for the best deal I could get.

    Positives: sweet, sweet, engine and good transmission; masses of room; nice steering; terrific brakes; quiet; versatile. Value for money is excellent.

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    Negatives: rock-hard seats, with too little angle on the cushion; loud air-con fan; hard-ish ride; TUST.

    The trip from home really was a breeze for the car, less so for the occupants. After about 2 hours, I got pretty sore from sitting, something my C5 never caused. Given that there are few cars that ride as well as a Citroen, that I would find the ride firm but acceptable says a lot for how well Peugeot has sorted the springs and dampers some bumps are blotted entirely, and there is none of the floatiness that my C5 showed.

    We went to Adelaide for an archery shoot, and took a number of large cases suit-, bow-, overnight-. Large toolbox, tripods, spotting scopes, two laptop cases, and the many other items that ladies are (in)famous for taking, whether they are needed or not. We had lots of spare room below window level, having put a seat down to take the bowcase.

    Economy was good-ish, being around high 6's there and back. The car has just hit 3,500 km.

    Climate was in the high 30's at times, and the air-con performed well, but was far noisier than my C5. It seems that overcast and hot gives very cold air at low fan speed (good), but sunny and hot gives less-cold air and higher fan speeds, which seems wrong to me.

    If a C5 was ideal to traverse the continent in loping, easy comfort, then my 308 would be at home and indeed it felt wonderful to drive on sweeping, undulating bends, like those of the Fleurieu Peninsula where we stayed. Blasting across the Snowy Mountains would be perfect. Oh, and the overtaking acceleration was terrific in the 308 so much so that I had to back off the acceleration much earlier than I was accustomed to. This I did with great reluctance, for the engine is such a wonderful unit. Brakes are excellent in all ways pedal feel, initial bite, rate of deceleration and saved me from damage when a driver made a spontaneous lane-change while I was nearly alongside her.

    I miss the headlights, the front parking sensors, and most of all, the dipping exterior mirror when I selected reverse on my C5. The integrated bluetooth on the 308 is sensational, and the door pockets bigger and more usable than my C5. The glass roof is nice, too. If I can locate a thin cushion of memory foam for the seat, I'll be quite happy.

    Cheers,

    Michael P

  2. #2
    Fellow Frogger! tomb's Avatar
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    Michael enjoyed you write up, did you test drive the diesel version?

  3. #3
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    Nice write up Michael - thank you.

  4. #4
    sans witticism SLC206's Avatar
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    Are the seats trimmed in leather or some other fabric?
    Regards,

    Simon

    2018 308 GTi 2011 DS3 DSport
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    2014 208 GTi 2007 207 GTi 2004 206 GTi180 2000 206 GTi 1995 306 XT

    www.peugeotclub.asn.au

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by tomb View Post
    Michael enjoyed you write up, did you test drive the diesel version?
    Hi Tomb,

    many thanks for the kind words.

    No, I did not try out the diesel versions for a few reasons.

    My C5 was a diesel, and I think I knew pretty much what I would be getting in a diesel 308.

    Around my home, each service station has one diesel pump, and so often I had to wait while there was another user; diesel for some reason is awfully messy, and it was common for me to get hold of a pump handle slippery with fuel. The concrete apron around the pump was often wet with spilt fuel, and slippery with it if it had been raining.

    For all that, I felt the 2-litre turbo diesel engine was great, but mated to the Aisin AL6 transmission (I think that's right), it was very much a mixed bag. Slowing for a roundabout or to turn a corner, I'd find a good 2-second lag between pushing the accelerator and anything happening. This was not turbo lag. Overtaking was strong, and once above 40 km/h, kickdown and changes were good. There were other flaws that I felt were unique to my car and I won't mention them here, unless you really want to know. Peugeot and Citroen have many of the same components and the engine/transmission combo is one of them, so I'll happily discuss things I think will help inform. All Citroen dealers I went to told me the pause was normal, and I didn't want another car that did the same things. After "resetting" the transmission, behavior was great, but as it "adapted" to my driving, that soon passed. I could never ascertain how I was to drive the car so that its transmission would respond normally.

    The Picasso has an "EGC" automated manual mated to the diesel engine. We took one for a test drive. To me this was very uncomfortable to drive though the salesman (let's call the dealership LD, for no good reason) said it was okay if you drove hard. Otherwise, each change up would result in heads rocking back and forth, so poor was the change quality. Driving hard reduced this, but did not eliminate it. This would get quite monotonous and unpleasant in traffic.

    While my C5 was at a dealer (I think it was April, and for the 4th time in 2010) they loaned me a C4 Turbo, and I was very impressed with the smoothness of the engine and its responsiveness.

    The 308 Touring is heavy for its size, and the diesel would have added even more weight, to the detriment of performance. Peugeot Oz claims 4 seconds difference to 100 km/h, but real-world acceleration would show a smaller gap. The extra 100kg in the nose would blunt the handling though, for sure. I believe the 2-litre diesel is generally regarded as the best engine for the Touring, and once moving, I thought the two would be even for overtaking acceleration, but I'm not so sure now. The 1.6 is great.

    This is very subjective of me, but I also feel the petrol suits the 308 better than the diesel. If someone said otherwise, I would not argue with them. But if the diesel came with that atrocious EGC transmission, I'd be quietly skeptical.

    So, against the diesel are: fuel availability (will change in the future); cleanliness (don't know about that one!); (possible) drivability issues; smoothness; blunter handling.

    Sorry to be so wordy, and I hope this has helped answer your question. If you have any others, ask away.

    Cheers,

    Michael P

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    Quote Originally Posted by SLC206 View Post
    Are the seats trimmed in leather or some other fabric?
    Hi SLC..,

    the seats are fabric-trimmed, I'm happy to say! I've had quite enough of leather - ice-cold in winter, hot and sticky in summer. No more greasing my upholstery!

    The fabric is black with some grey here and there. It seems to be of a higher quality than that in the 307, but I'm going on memory here.

    By the way, the Sportium has "sports seats" with thick side bolsters. These prevent the front passenger seat from folding flat like the manual says it will. Pity, but the backrest does a fine job of holding you in place.

    Cheers,

    Michael P

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    Fellow Frogger! tomb's Avatar
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    Thanks Michael, very clear and precise. I have a friend with the same car who just raves about it, also from a citroen household, just waiting for the right time to have test drive.

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    Hi Tomb, et al,

    would like to hear your thoughts on the diesel - if you get to drive one. I really like the petrol in my 308, but times and technology is changing all the time.

    Citroen has just released an updated 2-litre diesel with more power and torque, better economy. I'd expect this engine to make its way into the Peugeot lineup at some stage.

    Cheers,

    Michael P

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    Default 10,000km and honeymoon is still on! Mostly.

    Hi all,

    just got my 308 back from its first (and optional) service. Bayford in Melbourne changed the oil, and did some upgrades to the firmware.

    Bottom line is, I still enjoy owning the car. There are a few things that have me perplexed, and one thing that has me disappointed.

    The good news is that the car is still delightful to own, not just drive. Its roominess is great; the behavior in the wet is outstanding; interior versatility is also very easy to live with. After my C5, the ride is at times harsh, but mainly at middling to low speeds. Above this, I have no complaints.

    The sound system is surprisingly good,especially given it is the same as my C5. My Peugeot has good bass, so perhaps there was a speaker upgrade. The bluetooth system is very convenient and well thought-out. Connection to my phone is a little temperamental and one thing that has me (and the dealership) stumped is the "Activate Secret" option when a call ends. The handbook doesn't discuss it and the dealership didn't know either.

    There is a cooling duct from the air-con to the glovebox. But the glovebox is so small that to get a can in there it must be laid-down, and there is only room for one.

    The air-con struggles to keep the car cool on 30 degree days, which is very disappointing. Nowadays, this simply should not happen.

    A small negative are the wipers, which do not wipe fast enough at times, and leave several inches unswept on each side of the windscreen. The wipers sweep from the bottom of the windscreen to the outer edge, in a 90-degree arc or thereabouts.

    How I miss my bi-xenon headlights! The 308's are feeble in comparison and if I were to buy another 308, I would gladly pay more to be able to see at night. An exterior, passenger-side mirror that tilts down on selecting reverse would also be nice to have again.

    Economy is great: Melbourne to Geelong and back on under 6 l/100km. Turning into a corner feels... nice, really nice, and the car is an enjoyable drive. I was the sole driver of my C5 (search for my tale of woe in the Citroen area, if you must), but nobody misses a chance to take my 308 out for a spin.

    I jealously guard the keys!

    No reliability issues at all. Would love to know what "Activate Secret" means though. Perhaps I should give Daniel Craig a call...

    Cheers,

    Michael P

  10. #10
    Fellow Frogger! tomb's Avatar
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    Amazing really that things still stay the same for Peugeots, headllights not flash, a/c struggles when you need it most, wiper blades to short, ride fantastic, car great to drive. Been that way since .........

    Mike you could look at hychill, assuming the refridgerant being used is R134a, at some time in the future if you want to improve it. The consensus seems to be that it is a tremendous improvement and the compressor does less work. (Also don't forget to push the internal recirculate button when a/c is on, assuming the 308 is same set up as older pugs).

    Should be able to upgrade your headlight bulbs and fit longer blades to the wipers at very low cost.

    Cheers Tom

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by tomb View Post
    Amazing really that things still stay the same for Peugeots, headllights not flash, a/c struggles when you need it most, wiper blades to short, ride fantastic, car great to drive. Been that way since .........

    Mike you could look at hychill, assuming the refridgerant being used is R134a, at some time in the future if you want to improve it. The consensus seems to be that it is a tremendous improvement and the compressor does less work. (Also don't forget to push the internal recirculate button when a/c is on, assuming the 308 is same set up as older pugs).

    Should be able to upgrade your headlight bulbs and fit longer blades to the wipers at very low cost.

    Cheers Tom

    Hi Tom,

    thanks for the tips!

    My assumption is that the refrigerant is R134a - I hadn't heard of hychill before. I'm not sure that the problem is lack of cooling capacity, so much as something else not being quite right. The fact is, if it is sunny and hot, the thing struggles, with high fan speeds and not-so-cold air, but if it becomes overcast, then I have to back off the cooling a fair amount. I know to select recirculate, if the system doesn't do it for me. The dealer tels me it is working fine... but I've heard that before!

    I had a Subaru that suffered the same: I once left the climate control to its own devices and on a sunny, 20 degree day, the fan was flat out, with lukewarm air coming from the vents and recirculate active. Again, clouds came in and the air became icy. It's as if a light sensor is (ahem) on the blink.

    The wipers area different issue, and longer blades won't help - the blades are parallel with the A-pillars at the top of their stroke - they just don't go close enough to the pillars.

    Yes, I would agree with your assessment, that this is a car demonstrating many of the expected traits (both good and bad) of a Peugeot.

    Can I upgrade the headlight globes? I'm so used to everything being sealed away nowadays. Mind you, they might not be at fault - it could be that the bi-xenons spoilt me somewhat.

    While I think of it, I love the little satellite control thingies for the cruise and sound system. I hate my wife's Hyundai with its controls on the steering wheel that make me take my hands off the rim and eyes off the road to find and use them. And some cars nowadays have dozens of buttons on the steering wheel

    Cheers,

    Michael P

  12. #12
    sans witticism SLC206's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Metal Mick View Post
    While I think of it, I love the little satellite control thingies for the cruise and sound system. I hate my wife's Hyundai with its controls on the steering wheel that make me take my hands off the rim and eyes off the road to find and use them. And some cars nowadays have dozens of buttons on the steering wheel
    Enjoy it while it lasts. Unfortunately Peugeot appears to have listened to silly comments from car testers and the new cars coming up (508, etc.) now have steering wheels covered in buttons.

    I love my wands tucked out of the way but right there when you need them. I don't need to see them.

    Regards,

    Simon

    2018 308 GTi 2011 DS3 DSport
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    2014 208 GTi 2007 207 GTi 2004 206 GTi180 2000 206 GTi 1995 306 XT

    www.peugeotclub.asn.au

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by SLC206 View Post
    Enjoy it while it lasts. Unfortunately Peugeot appears to have listened to silly comments from car testers and the new cars coming up (508, etc.) now have steering wheels covered in buttons.

    I love my wands tucked out of the way but right there when you need them. I don't need to see them.
    Agreed! It's convenient to adjust cruise, hi-fi, etc with just your fingertips, while keeping your hands on the wheel. Same as the long standard indicators, lights, and wipers.

    In the pic above, you might be able to get to some of those buttons with your thumbs (without looking), but the ones at the bottom of the wheel are a long way from where your hands should normally be.

    Maybe the wheel switches are just for "pre take off" settings like launch control?
    "Democracy is the worst form of government, except for all the others."
    Winston Churchill
    (My benevolent dictatorship is the obvious exception)

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    Hi all,

    I guess it's a matter of function taking a back seat to form. Or something. I agree that wands and similar things are great.

    Memory tells me that Honda was one of the first with their cruise control buttons on an early Accord; I also recall Peugeot's sister brand Citroen tried to discard the wand by making the instrument binnacle bulge towards the steering wheel and placing switches (even for indicators) at fingertip length. (For some.)

    My wife though, hates the satellite controls and likes the steering wheel buttons on her i30, because they are easy to see!

    All may not be lost though: when I was loaned a C4 whilst my C5 was enjoying its monthly stay at a dealership, I found the steering wheel controls on that to be quite easy to come to grips with.

    The new Ford Focus was reported in Wheels, to have 21 buttons on the steering wheel. This seems excessive.

    Cheers,

    Michael P

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    Hi Michael,

    I recently purchased the 2.0 diesel version of the car you have and I am just up the road a bit, in Diamond Creek.

    Your assessment of your car was a great read and I see it much the same as you do. I love the 2.0 diesel motor in my car and coming from a Territory it copes with the hills surrounding home so much better and I'm losing touch with the girl at the servo because I never visit anymore. We had a loan 1.6 turbo petrol for a couple of days while the glass roof was replaced in ours. Definitely lighter in the front end but I found it a bit laggy, improved dramatically when I left it in sport mode, but these are all personal and subjective views, the reason I guess as to why they offer so much choice. My Megane (2.0 petrol) is now torque less by comparison.

    The interior space is tardis like for a small car, we were pretty worried coming down from the big Ford but have no regrets whatsoever. Have a roof pod (from the Ford we never used) if we need the luggage space for a big trip. The 7 buckets are great and like you my back stiffens after a couple of hours but I find my back is actually better the next day that it used to be after a trip in the Ford. The Megane is definitely more comfortable and more compliant over the little bumps but the 308 kills it over the bigger undulations.

    The blue tooth syncs beautifully with the ipad, kids watching movies with the speakers faded rearwards allows normal conversation up front.

    Economy is great, the table trays, clever, useful and how easy is it to clean once you rip all those seats out.

    I travelled to Bendigo a couple of weeks back, went up the calder and came back the back roads, no guessing which route was way more interesting and the car just came into its own on those back roads. Fast, surefooted, quiet ..........
    Cheers

    Steve.

    He - '05 Megane Dynamique - Black
    She - '10 308 Hdi Touring Sportium - Grey

  16. #16
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    re the wipers:

    I have a 307 and I believe the wipers are more or less the same.

    I too was pi$$ed off that they didn't sweep close enough to the pillars. Also the drivers side blade is shorter than the right, so the left side gets wiped better than the right.

    You can NOT fit a bigger blade on the right. The left blade parks on top and the geometry is such that if you fit a bigger blade on the right, the two blades will clash when they are about a quarter of the way up the screen - that's why they fit a smaller blade on the right. Its fine for left hand drive...

    You can, however, slightly change the sweep of the wipers so that they wipe closer to the pillars. Here's how...

    Open the bonnet.
    Using a texta, make a small mark on the windscreen to show where the wiper blades park as originally set. The mark is to show you how far up the screen they park.
    at the pivot end of the left wiper, where it joins the bodywork of the car, flick back the plastic cover to reveal the holding nut.
    Loosen the holding nut.
    wriggle jiggle the wiper arm in and out to release the wiper arm from the spline it attaches to. It can be difficult to make it release.
    Now position the wiper arm exactly one notch higher up the screen than the factory setting.
    tighten up the nut and put the plastic end cap back in place.

    Repeat the same operation on the other side.
    Make sure they are only one notch of the spline higher than normal.
    You must do both sides or the wipers will clash in operation.

    The wipers will now sweep quite close to the pillars. They will not go quite as far down when parked, but they still sit well below your normal vision.
    The only drawback is that, when wiping on high speed in heavy rain, sometimes one wiper will tap against the pillar with each sweep, giving a slight ticking noise with each sweep. I don't mind, at least it wipes a better pattern. It doesn't do any harm.

    If you don't feel confident, get the mechanic to do it for you. I did mine in 2007 and they are still set that way, much better than factory.

    Write to Peugeot and complain about them not setting the wipers up properly for RHD - they do it properly on the 207 and the 407, why not the 307 and 308? You won't get anywhere but if enough of us bitch, they might do the next model better. (dream on...)

  17. #17
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    Default 20,000km and counting

    HI all,

    I recently hit 20,000 km in my 308 1.6 Touring.

    Generally, they have been very enjoyable. Niggles I've mentioned in the past remain: too-firm seats, noisy and inadequate air-con (a loan 207 was vastly superior); the wipers; glovebox; headlights. I'm not a tall man, and I like my GPS (never, NEVER again will I get a TomTom) at the base of the screen. It's a long stretch and requires me to almost leave the driver's seat to mount it or change destinations. My wife is shorter than me and just about needs to climb onto the dashboard! I guess many of today's cars are similar.

    I'm still in awe of its wet-road performance, and enjoy the way the little engine spins freely. Perhaps a little more freely than before but I'd be lying if I said I remembered a difference. I've come to accept the ride and find it interesting that some bumps are blotted completely, yet others are felt quite strongly.

    A while back, there was a thread discussing the relative merits of the diesel over the petrol. I still prefer my petrol, but I miss the large toque of the diesel (I had a diesel C5). No doubt the diesel would be more economical, and I am annoyed that the trip computer is about 10% optimistic (factor that into my claims on another thread. My apologies!), whilst the fuel warning light comes on with about 17 litres remaining.

    I used the rear demister a while ago, just to see if it was working - there was a hint of mist on the inside rear window. In the past I waited a few minutes for it to clear without the demister, but in the name of research I pushed the button. Contrast this with urgent requirements for demisting on my wife's i30 (both front and rear) for much of the time, and it changes from a nice feature to a great one.

    I got a warning that coolant was low and a check showed this was so; I also noted the rocker-cover gasket was a bit leaky. Both were fixed at (an early) 20,000km service and remain that way. Both experiences - having the faults fixed promptly, and first time - are new to me, as a former Citroen owner.

    In the past I would have driven the car to a Citroen dealer for them to look at, waited till the parts arrived, then driven it back for the repair. Within days, I would have returned the car to have the repairs done properly or other corrective work.

    Great things that I like, apart from mist-free glass? The" feel" of the car - I'm comfortable with it and was surprised when I realized I'd only had it for a year. It felt a lot longer, but in a good way. The bluetooth thingy is great, but I still don't know what "Activate Secret" when a caller hangs up means and perhaps never will. The brakes. Versatility of the interior, although the seats are very heavy to move around when bent over. Ease of parking. The glass roof. Oh-so-easy cruise control...er... controls.

    It's been a joy to own and drive and shortly I'll be on my way to Adelaide in it for an archery shoot. It will be fully loaded with a roof basket for the gear.

    Still like it. Still glad I bought it. Thinking of keeping it way beyond expiry of the lease, but dollars and cents will decide that ultimately.

    Any questions, please fire away!

    Cheers,

    Michael P

  18. #18
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    An enjoyable read as usual.
    Chadi

    1982 504 SR white manual sedan with A/C (257 000 Km)
    2012 308 1.6 VTi Vapor Grey manual H/B (35000 Km)
    1994 405 1.6 white manual sedan (208 000 Km)
    1992 605 SV24 (91 000 Km)
    2005 406 2.0L automatic (Replaced with a 2013 C5)
    1983 505 GR white manual sedan with A/C (170000 Km)

    All since new


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    Default Charles 1, kangaroo population nil

    Hi all,

    for those who know the area of Plenty/Yarrambat in Victoria, I had a kangaroo mishap with Charles a week or so ago. The kangaroo hopped into the middle of my side of the road from the right and stopped, immediately after a car going the other way. Yan Yean road has streetlights in places, but sadly, not where the 'roo was. It died either instantly or nearly so. This is a dangerous piece of road and dead kangaroos are now nearly commonplace.

    I guess I should have been more careful/aware/slower/etc, but the creature stopped, just outside of low-beam headlight reach and the car that was heading the opposite way didn't do my night vision much good. But all is done now.

    My car survived surprisingly well and is being repaired as I write this.




    It looks like stuff has just popped out of place and needs a push to get it back in place, but the (plastic) wing has a crack in it and is not repairable. The 'roo was not overly large. I desperately hope to have it back soon.

    The loan car is a Mitsubishi Outlander - worth noting because it is re-badged as a 4007 - and is not far off being a good car in its own right, though it lacks the finesse expected of French cars. I'd feel a little short-changed if I bought one of these after a "regular" Peugeot.

    With the wry, sardonic, and black sense of humour that I have, I thought "Charles" was a fitting name for my 308. After Charles Darwin... natural selection...survival of the fittest...no? Perhaps not then. Sorry.

    Cheers,

    Michael P

  20. #20
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    sorry to hear about your brush with Skippy - but TBH i reckon around those parts these days its almost a case if WHEN not if... My outlaws live in South Morang, and we are in Kilmore, so are all to aware of the skippy problem in that area...

    Would be interested in a little more about the 4007 , that is one of the chariots on SWMBO's shortlist...

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    Hello Michael P,

    I just now happened to read this post - I'm a C5 person, paying a first visit to the Peugeot forum.

    I note your comments on the airconditioning. You may like to go to vwwatercooled.org.au and into passat B4 onwards, Climatronic problems - similar story. (sorry, I'm an old f*** and don't know about posting links). They seem to have pinned the problem down.

    Regards, Rossie.

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    Quote Originally Posted by cam740 View Post
    sorry to hear about your brush with Skippy - but TBH i reckon around those parts these days its almost a case if WHEN not if... My outlaws live in South Morang, and we are in Kilmore, so are all to aware of the skippy problem in that area...

    Would be interested in a little more about the 4007 , that is one of the chariots on SWMBO's shortlist...
    You're right re the inevitability of hitting one of these things - there's another dead one near the archery club/golf course.

    Re the 4007, the Mitsubishi is different in the engine and transmission department. The Peugeot is a diesel and this might work quite well. My overall impression is that the vehicle is quite good, though a little on the noisy side. Pluses are front seats, turning circle, ride, load space,, aircon/climate control, brakes, and the petrol gave my about 7.5 according to the trip computer on a Melbourne-Geelong-Melbourne trip, cornering is flat and mid-corner bumps seem not to throw it off line.

    Negatives are the rear seats - uncomfortable wire right under my glutes, and they fold electrically but cannot be removed, hard interior plastics, door closing with a tinny ding rather than a thunk, no feel to the steering at all, no reach adjustment for the wheel, the display for the sound system is one line and needs the manual to sort out properly, a little wandery at speed.

    Overall, there is a lack of... thought in the vehicle. The follow-me-home headlights I take for granted in my Peugeot don't exist in the Mitsubishi, and the convenience of things like auto up/down on all windows, the sound system in my Pug has independent levels for each input so I can set the radio to a comfortable sound and when I toggle back from the usb input, it is unchanged. Not having removable seats is not good, but looking at those in the Mitsubishi, they seem like a 2-person job even if they could be taken out. No auto for wipers or headlights.

    Europeans seem to thrive on making things functional (although at times a little bizarre, I guess), whereas the Japanese seem to concentrate on making their vehicle possess one distinguishing feature from others, and it is rare that the interior is ever so good as a European. How good would a Honda Odyssey be if Peugeot did the interior? The seating versatility in the Honda is very poor. (Peugeot does an equivalent - the 5008, sister to the Citroen C4 Grand Picasso.)

    Anyway, those are my thoughts. Any specific questions, please get back to me.

    Cheers,

    Michael P

  23. #23
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    Default

    Hi Rossie,

    many thanks for the tip. I'll look into it.

    Cheers,

    Michael P

  24. #24
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    Default 30,000 km and still counting

    Hi all,

    a few weeks ago, I reached 30,000km in Charlie. There is very little to report that is new.

    To me, the car is now like a dear and trusted friend... with a bad habit or two. I still dislike the seats, being too hard for my delicate rump. (Years ago, I fractured a bone in my coccyx, then had an operation to fixit, which was unsuccessful. I was in a fair amount of pain for several months, and less than useless during that time, so I don't look forward to another.) I guess that most others would be okay. Still, over short trips, I don't suffer too much.

    My trip to Adelaide in October was uneventful other than nearly having my doors sucked off by a low-flying Skoda Superb. I had just finished overtaking some dude and was still at around 130km/h at the time. Amazingly, the speed didn't kill me nor the Skoda driver! Economy, 4-up, fully loaded in the rear, plus a roof rack with enormous bowcases was around 8l/100km, from memory. A similar trip in my C5 diesel yielded about 7.

    The sole other demerit is in the wipers, which are too slow to sweep even when flat out.

    I was extremely critical of the air-con, but now am less so. It seems to have coped very well with high temperatures this summer, and I've had to regularly turn the temperature setting up because I was too cold! The demisting is still brilliant - the sides and rear glass don't fog up. I truly wish the blower was quieter, but it isn't too bad.

    I semi-regularly remove the seats to help one or other of my daughters move furniture around, and the vehicle accepts a lot of stuff.

    I trust the car, which is something I never could do with the C5 I had previously. I wrote earlier that if Charles burnt to the ground, I'd promptly go out and buy another. That still pretty much holds, though there are a couple of other cars I'd look at as well very closely, one being the 508.

    The turbo-petrol engine is still both a great feature and a slightly disappointing one. Had I not driven a diesel (C5) with its mountainous torque, I wouldn't be disappointed at all, but the heavy weight of the car plus its relatively low torque means it will need a lower gear at times than the diesel.

    Where the engine shines is in the sound it makes and the way it revs cleanly to around 6,500 before the auto slurs upwards a gear. This is fun I never would have had with the diesel. I don't rev it very often, because speed limits prevent me and fuel economy suffers.

    Brakes have always proved adequate, even when I was nearly side-swiped by a mother in her 4WD truck.

    Nothing has fallen off or broken, and it is the little things that make life easier: each window can go up or down completely with a touch of a button; I don't need to worry about the doors not being closed properly at night because it goes onto power saving mode; the little satellite controls that fall easily to hand for the sound and cruise control/speed limiter and bluetooth phone connection. They make using the car so much easier. The small demerits still remain, like a glovebox that takes...well - gloves, if folded neatly; cup holders that don't hold cups - whose idea was that?

    Bottom line: I like it, and don't regret buying it, and look forward to getting behind the wheel at every opportunity.

    Cheers,

    Michael P

  25. #25
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    Nov 2010
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    Eltham, Victoria
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    Default The $1700 dollar service. Plus tyres...

    HI all,

    I took my much-loved 308 in for its 40,000km service. The car is leased, and fully maintained.

    The brakes were obviously in need of attention and there were a few other bits and pieces too, like air filters and such.

    Total cost of the service was $1734. This included the oil change, wiper blades, new front rotors and pads, spark plugs and that's about it. An oil leak was fixed as a warranty item, I believe.

    The car does feel a lot better but $1700 is exorbitant and makes a mockery of Peugeot's promotion of a $330 service a year for 3 years.

    This is particularly disconcerting, because I'd like to think that rotors are not a sacrificial part any more. They were on my T5 Volvo, but I thought that was now of historical interest only. The new rotors are currently 26.7mm thick and at the next service I will measure them again to see what the wear is like.

    The Continental tyres were worn and needed to be replaced, at just over $300 each from the leasing company's preferred supplier. Comparable tyres in other brands such as Bridgestone are somewhat cheaper, but I said I preferred the wet weather performance of the Continentals (which is terrific).

    The new wiper blades do work a lot better, but for my Citroen were over $100 each so don't expect them to be any cheaper now. This is price-gouging on a ludicrous scale. The service cost included the "Peugeot Protection KIT", which I believe is a sheet of paper to cover the car mats, and a cut up bin-liner to go over the seat. Servicing charge included the removal of this as well!

    The dealer didn't inspect the tyres as they claim: there was a small bulge due to a damaged sidewall on the outside of a tyre (which I told them about), and when I did get the tyres replaced later, the leasing company's people showed me another one much larger (about the size of a hen's egg) on the same tyre, but on the inside sidewall. I raised this issue and was told that it was covered by the phrase "...found one to have a bulge..." and the advice that the tyres needed to be replaced. The tyre was in a dangerous condition, though I didn't realize it at the time. It is likely there are other things the Peugoet dealer claims to have done that weren't. Not good enough.

    I now have a loud whistle coming from the heater fan when I set it to floor, and the Peugeot dealer has helpfully said it isn't much different to others they've looked at. The noise is clearly audible over the radio... So, more hunting around for me, to get rid of this annoying sound.

    After 2 years, I finally got the bluetooth module fixed, so now I can connect the phone reliably. Mostly.

    So, the bottom line is that servicing and maintenance for the first two years amounts to about 10% of the purchase price. Or about $0.10 per kilometre. I'm trying to find a way to say it is reasonable, but I fail every time. Sure, another service centre would likely do it for less, but that is likely to be the case for any other brand as well.

    It is a great car, but really, maintenance is something I don't think should be so expensive. My wife's/daughter's Honda Jazz hasn't cost that much in 160,000km, and it has been to dealers almost exclusively.

    Cheers,

    Michael P

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