Intercooling a 505 Turbo Diesel
  • Register
  • Help
Results 1 to 23 of 23
  1. #1
    Demannu-facturing! Demannu's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2002
    Location
    Menzies Creek
    Posts
    2,541

    Default Intercooling a 505 Turbo Diesel

    I fear that I have been falling into the trap of too much talking and not enough doing lately, so I decided to change that.

    I have a problem. Whenever I have a car with nothing wrong with it, I get bored with it, and start to tinker. A 505 SRDT and a spare intercooler lying around from an early supra - Hmmmm.

    A couple of phone calls confirmed that this was going to be a DIY job. With me installing the intercooler, I was quoted between $900 and $1600 to have someone make up the pipework and install it. Bugger that, I thought.

    If anyone is thinking of doing this, be warned that it is a very involved job, and it took me basically 2 whole days working flat out to do it. If you're afraid of doing serious work to your car, or have a problem cutting holes in body work, don't even think about it. Stop reading now.

    So, off with the front of the 505. You need to remove the bumper bar, grille, horns, aircon cooling fan, RH headlight, air filter, air filter bracket, air filter to turbo hose, wastegate hose, and last but not least, the turbo. You will also need to remove the RH bumper bar bracket for now.

    You will need to use your imagination to fit the intercooler in place. I used one from an early Toyota Supra, previously modified to fit a 505 V6 turbo application. Some forum members may recognise it. It needs to be secure, and you need to think about where the outlets are because somehow, you have to pipe the air to and from it. You also have to be able to fit a bumper bar, grill and headlight back on it.

    At some point (I did this at this point), you will need to buy some turbo hose, steel pipe, hose clamps etc. Costs were as follows:

    4x 90 degree bends 2 inch mild steel pipe - $40
    1 metre 2 inch mild steel pipe - $6
    6x 2" silicon turbo hose straight through connectors - $144
    16x 40-63mm hose clamps - $27.20

    So, after bolting the intercooler in place, it looked sort of like this:



    You will also note that I have already cut some holes in the body work. This is only the beginning! Obviously, you will have to work out where your holes need to be, but this is how I did it.

    The upper pipe that you can see goes through the body immediately above the bumper bar bracket, and goes through the hole aiming pretty much at the bottom of the manifold, just where I want it.

    The second pipe goes into the wheel arch. We'll get to this again shortly.

    Next, undo the 6 bolts on the back of the turbo compressor housing. Don't even try this in the car, it simply doesn't work. Remove the compressor cover, and clean everything inside thoroughly. It's amazing how a bit of crap in here can make your turbo spool up so much slower.

    Refit the compressor cover to the turbo rotate 90 degrees anticlockwise from it's original position. Manufacture a new wastegate actuating hose to suit the new location. Reinstall the turbo. Your compressor outlet should now be aiming directly towards the chassis at the base of the strut tower.

    Remove the RH front wheel. Measure the place for the hole, and then cut it so that the compressor outlet is in line with it. Make sure you cut at least a 3" hole to allow for movement of the 2.25"OD air hose with engine movement.

    You will now need to cut your steel. For me, 3 of the 90 degree bends needed to be cut off immediately after the bends on one side, the other one has about 6" from the end (as seen in the photos above). I also needed to make 2 extra linking bits, both 8 inches long.

    Using the silicon hose and lots of clamps, clamp it all together. You will need a 90 degree bend from the turbo through the wheel arch, then a short piece to link it to another 90 degree bend that goes through the front to the intercooler. From the intercooler, another 90 degree bend above the bumper bar bracket bolts, to another short pipe, and into another 90 degree bend aiming upwards into the manifold.

    Refit the air filter to turbo hose (it does fit back in perfectly). Remove the U-shaped pipe from the bottom of the air filter, and refit to engine bay with it's brackets. Refit the headlight, grille and bumper bar. I refitted the bumper bar without the RH bracket, it still sits perfectly flat and there are 4 other bolts holding it on. It's fine, just so long as I don't have an accident.

    The end result should look something like this:


    Look any different? It shouldn't, it all looks completely stock from the outside.

    But underneath the bumper:


    And under the bonnet should look something like this:

    You can just see the pipes there, with blue hoses holding them all together.

    And the results? Well, I think I am losing a couple of pound boost across the intercooler, so I want to reroute the wastegate actuator hose to the manifold instead of the compressor cover. Also, I still have to modify the bottom of the air filter to allow more air into it, it is partially obscured by the intercooler pipe at the moment. I'll add cold air induction when I fix this.

    I took it for a drive for about 100 kms today, 50 of which was towing a trailer. It definately has more poke on boost, even with the boost drop. I will report back after a trip to Melbourne this coming weekend as to any improvement in fuel consumption. If I get a chance beforehand, I will fit a boost controller and wind it up to about 12psi.

    Cooling system sofar hasn't suffered, it was 30 degrees today and in heavy traffic the car still didn't show any signs of getting hot. The thermofan may have been cutting in a little more often than usual, but still cuts out after about a minute.

    Sofar I'm extremely happy with it, and would recommend it to anyone with the time, inclination and patience. But I stress again, this is a much harder job than it may at first seem.

    Advertisement
    Scotty

    Melbourne - Dandenong Ranges

    1956 Peugeot 403 - 'Francois' - resto project

    1969 Peugeot 504 - 'Pascal' - daily driver project

    1970 Peugeot 404 Utility - 'Brutus' - resto project

    1978 Peugeot 604 - as yet unnamed - V6 on straight LPG

    1987 Peugeot 505 - as yet unnamed - project car

    1999 Peugeot 406 Coupé - 'Chloe' - 5 speed manual

    2011 Peugeot 3008 XTE HDi - 'Zoe' - hatchback on steroids

    2014 Peugeot RCZ - 'Remy'

    1999 Range Rover 4.6 HSE - 'Grover' - tow car

  2. #2
    Member GTIrally's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Location
    Adelaide
    Posts
    66

    Default

    Very nice.

    Ahh 'Peugeot', the drivers car! Why drive anything less!!!!!!!!!!!

  3. #3
    Gus
    Gus is offline
    Fellow Frogger! Gus's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2002
    Location
    Canberra, Australia
    Posts
    600

    Default

    Congratulations.

    Looks like it's definitely a tricky job, but looks like a very neat solution. Would you be able to run wide wheels/tyres without any risk of rubbing your hose?

    As I said in the other thread, I'm going to have a go with water injection, first (I figure I get carbon build-up reduction as a free bonus.) Dunno if I'm game enough to be cutting such holes (mine wouldn't be as neat .)

  4. #4
    1000+ Posts HONG KONG PUGGY's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2002
    Location
    Yarrabilba, Queensland
    Posts
    2,758

    Default

    Demannu,
    Very nice work. You have a lot of spare time I see
    Is the SRDT engine a crossflow engine? Would an I/C with the in let and outlet on opposite sides have been better? S**b ones are like that and you could probably get away with buying most of the piing and an I/C froma wrecker for next to nothing too , for next time
    2016 Renault Sport Clio Cup EDC 200



    Previous

    2001 Rx-4 Privilege
    R17TL, 1973
    R20TS x 3
    R18 GTS wagon x 2
    R10





    "When you hit the tree between the headlights thats understeer. Oversteer is when you hit the tree between the Tail Lights" - Wayne Bell

  5. #5
    Demannu-facturing! Demannu's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2002
    Location
    Menzies Creek
    Posts
    2,541

    Default

    GTIRally - Ta.

    Gus - It is definately a tricky job, but actually turned out neater than I had planned. As you can see, my car already has wider than normal alloys on it, and with the wheels in a straight line, there is about 8 inches clearance. However, just before full lock left, the tyre contacts the pipe. I'm going to try to move the pipe closer to the body, and if that doesn't solve the problem completely, I'm going to adjust the tie rod ends on the steering rack so that you can't actually turn the wheel far enough to contact it. It will also improve my U-turn ability, and is probably more the way I like my steering set up.

    HKP - It's a non-crossflow engine. The intercooler from the Supra was remarkably convenient. I have a Saab 900 intercooler here as well, and it was going to be a nightmare to install, that's why I opted to use the Supra item. And unless the Saab happened to actually "be" a Peugeot 505, chances of secondhand piping coming anywhere near close to fitting are virtually nil.

    And besides, I like the fact that unless you are actually looking for the intercooler and pipework, you won't see it. It looks completely stock. I'm planning the same sort of discreet setup with the V6 turbo, but it will be a bigger cooler. Sleeper!
    Scotty

    Melbourne - Dandenong Ranges

    1956 Peugeot 403 - 'Francois' - resto project

    1969 Peugeot 504 - 'Pascal' - daily driver project

    1970 Peugeot 404 Utility - 'Brutus' - resto project

    1978 Peugeot 604 - as yet unnamed - V6 on straight LPG

    1987 Peugeot 505 - as yet unnamed - project car

    1999 Peugeot 406 Coupé - 'Chloe' - 5 speed manual

    2011 Peugeot 3008 XTE HDi - 'Zoe' - hatchback on steroids

    2014 Peugeot RCZ - 'Remy'

    1999 Range Rover 4.6 HSE - 'Grover' - tow car

  6. #6
    Fellow Frogger! tassiediesel's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    Tasmania
    Posts
    175

    Default Awesome

    Demannu......It's blokes like you that make this forum a great place to be!
    82 Peugeot 505 Turbo Diesel
    78 VW Golf diesel
    80 VW Golf diesel
    84 Nissan Patrol MQ diesel

  7. #7
    1000+ Posts bowie's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Sydney, Concord City, Sir.
    Posts
    3,441

    Default

    indeed.. there is just something about a 505 with a gaint fridge tucked away that brings out a healthy dose of boyhood giggles

    Works: 2003 YV Commodore (That is Cecil to you)
    Playing: R12, SuperPos, thinks It's a race car and Sunny the R12 Lego set.
    Previous: SuperGrumpy fuel spitting 504ti(ish), SuperComfortable 505 STI, SuperDoper carried my groceries Mi16, Choo Choo'd Volvo S40
    Wanted Will hoard 12/15/17 Junk.

    "More and more of less and less" - Marina Abramović

  8. #8
    Demannu-facturing! Demannu's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2002
    Location
    Menzies Creek
    Posts
    2,541

    Default

    Update -

    Yesterday, before I drove to Melbourne, I ran the wastegate actuator hose to the manifold pressure line for the injector pump with a bass T piece, and blocked off the hole in the compressor cover.

    I am now getting full boost at the manifold, and the difference in torque is very prominent. I drove out the freeway through the Adelaide hills sitting on 100kms/h in fifth gear. I shifted down to fourth to go through the tunnel and left it in fourth till the top of the hill. The engine started getting warmer than usual, but not enough to worry about. The temperature collapsed as soon as I hit the top of the hill. Note that I was towing a particularly heavy 6x4 trailer with an XN motor with all accessories strapped in. It was also 36 degrees OAT.

    Still very happy with the job, and I will update again when I have solved my turning circle problems.
    Scotty

    Melbourne - Dandenong Ranges

    1956 Peugeot 403 - 'Francois' - resto project

    1969 Peugeot 504 - 'Pascal' - daily driver project

    1970 Peugeot 404 Utility - 'Brutus' - resto project

    1978 Peugeot 604 - as yet unnamed - V6 on straight LPG

    1987 Peugeot 505 - as yet unnamed - project car

    1999 Peugeot 406 Coupé - 'Chloe' - 5 speed manual

    2011 Peugeot 3008 XTE HDi - 'Zoe' - hatchback on steroids

    2014 Peugeot RCZ - 'Remy'

    1999 Range Rover 4.6 HSE - 'Grover' - tow car

  9. #9
    Fellow Frogger! tlampre's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    Melbourne
    Posts
    167

    Default

    Demannu, any fuel consumption figures?
    It's only a car.

  10. #10
    Demannu-facturing! Demannu's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2002
    Location
    Menzies Creek
    Posts
    2,541

    Default

    Yep, returned from Melbourne last night.

    On the way to Melbourne, with a mild headwind, 2 people plus luggage in the car, 6x4 box trailer with an XN motor with all accessories, plus my two tool boxes, sitting on the speed limit (100-110kms/h) we got 38mpg. On the return trip, at similar speeds and with a ferocious wind from our front left quarter most of the way, but without the motor in the trailer and the front of the trailer removed and the back folded down for aerodynamics, we got 41mpg.

    I think the big issue is that at cruising speeds, the turbo is not on boost.

    I am now considering fitting a smaller, ball bearing turbo (possibly a GT25R) to enable the car to be on boost at lower throttle settings. This will probably mess with top end power, but I'm not bothered by that, I'm looking to improve fuel economy!
    Scotty

    Melbourne - Dandenong Ranges

    1956 Peugeot 403 - 'Francois' - resto project

    1969 Peugeot 504 - 'Pascal' - daily driver project

    1970 Peugeot 404 Utility - 'Brutus' - resto project

    1978 Peugeot 604 - as yet unnamed - V6 on straight LPG

    1987 Peugeot 505 - as yet unnamed - project car

    1999 Peugeot 406 Coupé - 'Chloe' - 5 speed manual

    2011 Peugeot 3008 XTE HDi - 'Zoe' - hatchback on steroids

    2014 Peugeot RCZ - 'Remy'

    1999 Range Rover 4.6 HSE - 'Grover' - tow car

  11. #11
    Fellow Frogger! tlampre's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    Melbourne
    Posts
    167

    Default

    Ok, that's 7.4 l/100km to Melb, 6.9 coming back, assuming UK gallons. Pretty good given the load and conditions.
    It's only a car.

  12. #12
    Fellow Frogger! Uffee's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    Adelaide
    Posts
    651

    Default

    I had a think about putting a turbo on the campervan I've got to try and get better highway mileage because that's mainly how it gets driven but the conclusion I arrived at was that unless you've got your foot to the floor (which you won't when you're cruising) then you'll be running with excess air so more air from the turbocharger won't really achieve much. This is just a theory though.

    It seems strange that you're not getting boost at 100+ clicks. Some rough back of the envelope calculations tell me that the engine would be turning over at about 3000 revs at 100 with a 3.7 diff, more revs with a higher diff. The maximum torque is supposed to be at 2500 revs so the turbo would have to be boosting by then?
    504 GL Coupe '73 Silver
    504 GTDT Pickup Mini-Motorhome '83 Coral Red
    407 HDi Sedan '05

  13. #13
    1000+ Posts bowie's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Sydney, Concord City, Sir.
    Posts
    3,441

    Default

    possibly not depedning on exhaust manifold, turbine size associated plumbing etc etc,, not to mention that intercooler..

    smaller turbo might be better for it. strangly enough.

    Works: 2003 YV Commodore (That is Cecil to you)
    Playing: R12, SuperPos, thinks It's a race car and Sunny the R12 Lego set.
    Previous: SuperGrumpy fuel spitting 504ti(ish), SuperComfortable 505 STI, SuperDoper carried my groceries Mi16, Choo Choo'd Volvo S40
    Wanted Will hoard 12/15/17 Junk.

    "More and more of less and less" - Marina Abramović

  14. #14
    Demannu-facturing! Demannu's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2002
    Location
    Menzies Creek
    Posts
    2,541

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Uffee
    I had a think about putting a turbo on the campervan I've got to try and get better highway mileage because that's mainly how it gets driven but the conclusion I arrived at was that unless you've got your foot to the floor (which you won't when you're cruising) then you'll be running with excess air so more air from the turbocharger won't really achieve much. This is just a theory though.

    It seems strange that you're not getting boost at 100+ clicks. Some rough back of the envelope calculations tell me that the engine would be turning over at about 3000 revs at 100 with a 3.7 diff, more revs with a higher diff. The maximum torque is supposed to be at 2500 revs so the turbo would have to be boosting by then?
    Excess air is always a good thing, but boost equals even more excess air. Basically, the efficiency of a diesel engine is attained by the extremely high compression ratios, and by boosting the engine you are increasing the effective compression ratio, and therefore the combustion chamber pressure. This in turn increases the efficiency of the motor, and therefore gives you a bigger bang for the same amount of fuel injected. Therefore, less fuel is required to produce the same bang, therefore less fuel is required for cruising.

    Problem is, turbine speed and therefore boost levels are determined solely by the volume of gasses escaping from the exhaust side of the engine at a given rate. When there is only a small amount of fuel being injected, exhaust gasses are barely more than the intake charge. The more throttle added, the more exhaust gasses there are, therefore the more boost, therefore the more bang, therefore the more exhaust gasses, therefore more boost, etc, etc, etc. It is an ongoing cycle, until the wastegate is actuated to maintain a certain pressure, and therefore a certain volume of air entering the engine at a certain RPM. At highway speeds, even with the headwind and trailer on, cruising does not require enough throttle to produce enough exhaust gasses to spool up the turbo.

    A smaller turbine wheel and housing, however, will require less exhaust gasses to rotate at the same speed. This does, however, reduce the flow capacity of the turbine and will in the top end of the rev range. Not usually a big issue in a diesel. I have always thought that the 505 TD had too big a turbo for the application. It's all about keeping the turbo within it's most efficient operating pressure/flow at the most appropriate engine revs.

    So after all that, if the engine was running on boost on cruise conditions, it would be dramatically more efficient.
    Scotty

    Melbourne - Dandenong Ranges

    1956 Peugeot 403 - 'Francois' - resto project

    1969 Peugeot 504 - 'Pascal' - daily driver project

    1970 Peugeot 404 Utility - 'Brutus' - resto project

    1978 Peugeot 604 - as yet unnamed - V6 on straight LPG

    1987 Peugeot 505 - as yet unnamed - project car

    1999 Peugeot 406 Coupé - 'Chloe' - 5 speed manual

    2011 Peugeot 3008 XTE HDi - 'Zoe' - hatchback on steroids

    2014 Peugeot RCZ - 'Remy'

    1999 Range Rover 4.6 HSE - 'Grover' - tow car

  15. #15
    Fellow Frogger! Uffee's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    Adelaide
    Posts
    651

    Default

    I'd completely overlooked the effects of a higher effective compression ratio giving better fuel economy. Should have known better...
    504 GL Coupe '73 Silver
    504 GTDT Pickup Mini-Motorhome '83 Coral Red
    407 HDi Sedan '05

  16. #16
    Fellow Frogger! jarrods's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Location
    Melbourne
    Posts
    303

    Default

    Is there any reason why they don't supercharge diesels. This sounds like an ideal application unless I'm missing something.

    Jarrod

  17. #17
    Demannu-facturing! Demannu's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2002
    Location
    Menzies Creek
    Posts
    2,541

    Default

    Uffee, I forgot to mention that the SRDT has a 3.58:1 diff, and with the fifth gear 100kms/h is exactly 2500 RPM. It is well and truly on boost at full throttle, and it flies (for a diesel), but is nowhere near boost at cruising throttle rates.

    Jarrod - They do. Many small japanese diesel vehicles are supercharged. They have their advantages, like constant boost, however the supercharger uses some of the engine's power to drive the compressor, and therefore doesn't actually increase the overall efficiency of the system. It simply makes more power from a small engine. The more power you want to produce, the more energy the supercharger consumes. A turbo, on the other hand, increases the overall efficiency of the system by utilising an otherwise wasted energy source without restricting the engine to much of a degree.
    Scotty

    Melbourne - Dandenong Ranges

    1956 Peugeot 403 - 'Francois' - resto project

    1969 Peugeot 504 - 'Pascal' - daily driver project

    1970 Peugeot 404 Utility - 'Brutus' - resto project

    1978 Peugeot 604 - as yet unnamed - V6 on straight LPG

    1987 Peugeot 505 - as yet unnamed - project car

    1999 Peugeot 406 Coupé - 'Chloe' - 5 speed manual

    2011 Peugeot 3008 XTE HDi - 'Zoe' - hatchback on steroids

    2014 Peugeot RCZ - 'Remy'

    1999 Range Rover 4.6 HSE - 'Grover' - tow car

  18. #18
    Fellow Frogger! Uffee's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    Adelaide
    Posts
    651

    Default

    The selling point for diesels for the general population is the fuel economy so I'd say that that would rule out a supercharger straight away for a major manufacturer.
    504 GL Coupe '73 Silver
    504 GTDT Pickup Mini-Motorhome '83 Coral Red
    407 HDi Sedan '05

  19. #19
    Fellow Frogger! Uffee's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    Adelaide
    Posts
    651

    Default

    3.58? That would make it nice and cruisy. The campervan has a ridiculously high ratio because of the ute heritage so it tops out at about 110.
    504 GL Coupe '73 Silver
    504 GTDT Pickup Mini-Motorhome '83 Coral Red
    407 HDi Sedan '05

  20. #20
    Demannu-facturing! Demannu's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2002
    Location
    Menzies Creek
    Posts
    2,541

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Uffee
    3.58? That would make it nice and cruisy. The campervan has a ridiculously high ratio because of the ute heritage so it tops out at about 110.
    Yes, it suits it perfectly. With the intercooler, planting your foot to overtake from 90kms/h, you hear the turbo spool up, and it lets loose. In gear accelleration (5th gear) at these speeds is much better than my 505 GTi or 405 Mi16. 90kms/h is 2250RPM, and before you know it you are doing 120kms/h (3000RPM), and if you let it go it will boost all the way to 4000RPM (160kms/h). Great for spending as little time as possible on the wrong side of the road! I do not condone such behaviour, but I don't like to spend too long on the wrong side of the road next to a 3 trailer long road train. Beyond 4000RPM the engine begins to feel a little rough, it's more than the diesel is designed for. The turbo is still boosting though, which is another reason why I think a smaller turbo would be more suited to the application. If the turbo runs out of puff beyond these revs, it's no big deal, you never use that sort of RPM anyway.
    Scotty

    Melbourne - Dandenong Ranges

    1956 Peugeot 403 - 'Francois' - resto project

    1969 Peugeot 504 - 'Pascal' - daily driver project

    1970 Peugeot 404 Utility - 'Brutus' - resto project

    1978 Peugeot 604 - as yet unnamed - V6 on straight LPG

    1987 Peugeot 505 - as yet unnamed - project car

    1999 Peugeot 406 Coupé - 'Chloe' - 5 speed manual

    2011 Peugeot 3008 XTE HDi - 'Zoe' - hatchback on steroids

    2014 Peugeot RCZ - 'Remy'

    1999 Range Rover 4.6 HSE - 'Grover' - tow car

  21. #21
    Fellow Frogger! downunderyank's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    Longford Tas
    Posts
    220

    Default turbo

    I spoke in length today to a fellow in Devonport that runs the only Turbo shop in Tassie. I told him what we diesel heads were after and he said that it would be possible to modify the T03 with a smaller housing from a T25 or T28 to spool at around 1200rpm but it would run out of puff by abour 3500. I think this would be perfect for my diesel as it likes the lower ranges best anyway. He also was telling me about a Glycol intercooler that uses Glycol as a refrigerant so it cools the charge to about 20 degrees C and there is no lag as it is a small stright run about 200mm long. Unfortunately it is also $1400! As a side note, he didn't think turboing the XD88 would cause it any harm if I had the pistons Jet Hot Coated as it doesn't have any piston squirters and kept the boost low (6-8psi). What do you think Scotty?
    Before you judge someone, walk a mile in their shoes. Then when you judge them, you're a mile away and you've got thier shoes!

  22. #22
    Fellow Frogger! downunderyank's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    Longford Tas
    Posts
    220

    Default K&n

    BTW, did you think about putting a K&N filter on the creme mobile? IT may not make a huge performance gain, but it may clean the engine bay up a bit by getting rid of that big ugle black canister!
    Before you judge someone, walk a mile in their shoes. Then when you judge them, you're a mile away and you've got thier shoes!

  23. #23
    Demannu-facturing! Demannu's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2002
    Location
    Menzies Creek
    Posts
    2,541

    Default

    Dan,

    I agree with the idea of replacing the turbine housing and wheel with a smaller item. It would definately suit the engine better.

    As for turboing the XD88, I really dont think those boost pressures are going to create a noticeable enough difference to bother. The turbo will strangle the engine before it comes on boost, and the overall nett gain would not be worth it.

    I have considered fitting a K&N style pod filter to the 505, but that leaves issues with finding the correct pressure points to connect the PCV system to. The standard one doesn't really flow that badly, but I do need to do something about having the intercooler pipe passing directly under and potentially restricting the inlet to the air filter. I would also like to add cold air induction, just for that extra bit of air density.

    On a completely different topic, I am considering selling the "505 SRDTi" (with intercooler). I prefer the drive of my 504 diesel wagon, and will be re-registering the wagon this weekend. The wagon loading space is more suited to my needs, too. The 505 will then be surplus to my needs. If anyone is interested in what is a genuinely excellent car, PM me and we shall talk.
    Scotty

    Melbourne - Dandenong Ranges

    1956 Peugeot 403 - 'Francois' - resto project

    1969 Peugeot 504 - 'Pascal' - daily driver project

    1970 Peugeot 404 Utility - 'Brutus' - resto project

    1978 Peugeot 604 - as yet unnamed - V6 on straight LPG

    1987 Peugeot 505 - as yet unnamed - project car

    1999 Peugeot 406 Coupé - 'Chloe' - 5 speed manual

    2011 Peugeot 3008 XTE HDi - 'Zoe' - hatchback on steroids

    2014 Peugeot RCZ - 'Remy'

    1999 Range Rover 4.6 HSE - 'Grover' - tow car

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •