404 Shift pattern - why was it revised?
  • Register
  • Help
Results 1 to 8 of 8
  1. #1
    Tadpole
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    Marrickville, Sydney
    Posts
    7

    Default 404 Shift pattern - why was it revised?

    10 years after I left a 403, and without any subsequent exposure to worm-drives, I slotted in behind the wheel of a 404 seamlessly, except for the gear change. Why was it reversed? I keep wanting to engage 1st towards my left ankle, and it's plain wrong that 4th gear cruising has the stick against my knee, when it should be safely 'up'.
    I understand this was a late development for the 404, is this an aberration limited to the Aussie Assembled cars? - some sort of attempt to mimic familiar 3-on-tree Holden/Falcon/Valiant?
    404 does not quite match the simple grace of the 403 controls. I loved the white plastic switches on the 403, the starter button, the vertical umbrella handbrake. However 404 performance is much easier to live with.

    Advertisement
    Andrew Vickery - 404 with 2 x babyseats

  2. #2
    Budding Architect ???? pugrambo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2000
    Location
    Parkes - N.S.W - Australia - Earth
    Posts
    12,265

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by drevick
    10 years after I left a 403, and without any subsequent exposure to worm-drives, I slotted in behind the wheel of a 404 seamlessly, except for the gear change. Why was it reversed? I keep wanting to engage 1st towards my left ankle, and it's plain wrong that 4th gear cruising has the stick against my knee, when it should be safely 'up'.
    I understand this was a late development for the 404, is this an aberration limited to the Aussie Assembled cars? - some sort of attempt to mimic familiar 3-on-tree Holden/Falcon/Valiant?
    404 does not quite match the simple grace of the 403 controls. I loved the white plastic switches on the 403, the starter button, the vertical umbrella handbrake. However 404 performance is much easier to live with.

    403 was always a nicer car to drive albeit needing a few more horses

    the 404 gear change pattern changed when they went from the C3 gearbox to the BA7
    3 x '78 604 SL

    1 x 2018 3008

    1 x 2000 Citroen XM,

    1 x '98 306 GTi6 sadly sold

    1 x secret project

    1 x '98 406 STDT troop carrier and i don't care if it stinks, i don't sniff it's arse Death by wank tank

    1 x '99 406SV 5spd wagon, time to burn more fuel

    1 x 1994 605 SV3.0

  3. #3
    1000+ Posts
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    Location Location
    Posts
    1,576

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by pugrambo
    403 was always a nicer car to drive albeit needing a few more horses

    the 404 gear change pattern changed when they went from the C3 gearbox to the BA7
    luuuvred the C3 box. Coupled to a 1600 motor they're incredibly flexible. Nice around town - change straight up to second you don't have to cross the gate. A C3 is much nicer than a BA7.

  4. #4
    1000+ Posts
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Location
    anywhere
    Posts
    2,001

    Default

    Perhaps Peugeot was starting to conform with the rest of the world. I think they moved to a conventional gate with the 204.

  5. #5
    1000+ Posts Wildebeest's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    Perth Western Australia
    Posts
    2,694

    Default 404 shift pattern..

    Quote Originally Posted by drevick
    10 years after I left a 403, and without any subsequent exposure to worm-drives, I slotted in behind the wheel of a 404 seamlessly, except for the gear change. Why was it reversed? I keep wanting to engage 1st towards my left ankle, and it's plain wrong that 4th gear cruising has the stick against my knee, when it should be safely 'up'.
    I understand this was a late development for the 404, is this an aberration limited to the Aussie Assembled cars? - some sort of attempt to mimic familiar 3-on-tree Holden/Falcon/Valiant?
    404 does not quite match the simple grace of the 403 controls. I loved the white plastic switches on the 403, the starter button, the vertical umbrella handbrake. However 404 performance is much easier to live with.
    I believe the shift patterns were more conventional on the Left Hand Drive Peugeots.
    It was another of Peugeots quirks, like the Left side bonnet pull!
    It's not in the French make-up to bother catering for small market RHD countries.

    PS. If the 404 lever is resting on your knee the linkages are badly worn or during a column change overhaul someone has fitted the lower links out of kilter.
    Last edited by Wildebeest; 8th October 2005 at 07:19 PM. Reason: bad spelling..

  6. #6
    VIP Sponsor
    Join Date
    Aug 2000
    Posts
    9,258

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Wildebeest
    I believe the shift patterns were more conventual on the Left Hand Drive Peugeots.
    It was another of Peugeots quirks, like the Left side bonnet pull!
    It's not in the French make-up to bother catering for small market RHD countries.

    PS. If the 404 lever is resting on your knee the linkages are badly worn or during a column change overhaul someone has fitted the lower links out of kilter.
    1st was towards you and up for the left hand drive cars, the same as things like Mazda 1500 and Toyota Corona.
    There was too big a gap between first and second on the C3 box.
    Apart from that the poor synchro in first and the coil spring clutch make city traffic very hard work. I think the thousands of traffic lights we have nowadays have made these gearboxes/clutches obsolete.
    A good BA7 is absolutely brilliant, the best gear shift of any car.
    Graham

  7. #7
    1000+ Posts
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Location
    anywhere
    Posts
    2,001

    Default

    Thinking about the rationale for the early change which came with the 203 - first and reverse were in the same plane, which was convenient for parking. Second and third were the most commonly used gears around town, so they were in the same plane. The spring loaded first to second change was so good it might as well have been in the same plane. The transmission was a three speed for town use with overdrive for highway use only (over 40-45 mph). Probably wouldn't suit modern traffic speeds.

  8. #8
    VIP Sponsor
    Join Date
    Aug 2000
    Posts
    9,258

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Russell Hall
    Thinking about the rationale for the early change which came with the 203 - first and reverse were in the same plane, which was convenient for parking. Second and third were the most commonly used gears around town, so they were in the same plane. The spring loaded first to second change was so good it might as well have been in the same plane. The transmission was a three speed for town use with overdrive for highway use only (over 40-45 mph). Probably wouldn't suit modern traffic speeds.
    The clutch is the main problem. A 403 with a box and shift in good condition
    and a hydraulic/diaphragm clutch would be excellent.
    The 203 and early 404 shifts leave a bit to be desired, the 203 has one extra linkage and the 404 is a bit imprecise when compared to the 403.
    Graham.

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •