How to change 306 rear pads - I don't think I've done it correctly
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  1. #1
    Fellow Frogger!
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    How to change 306 rear pads - I don't think I've done it correctly

    Hey there,

    Replaced the rear pads, had difficulty getting the piston in because of the handbrake.

    So I twisted the piston 45 degrees using a small screwdriver in the groove (as per a 205Gti) and tried to push it in, but no luck.

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    I noticed if I kept on turning it clockwise, it was like it was threaded and I kept turning it until the pad would fit.

    In hindsight, this seems completely wrong... although the brakes work fine.

    I want to take them apart again and do it properly, what do I do?

    Also, have I succeeded in totally stuffing up the adjustment of my rear brakes/handbrake by twiddling with the piston so much? I remember *approximately* how many turns I did (about 5 quarter turns).

    Cheers,
    Adrian

  2. #2
    1000+ Posts brenno's Avatar
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    Adrian - Sorry I missed your call earlier.

    I have a Service Manual here - but it doesnt cover things like S16's and GTi6's.

    I will type out the instuctions anyway as it might be vaguely relevant.

    Rear brake pad renewal

    1. Extract the small spring clip from the pad retaining plate, and then slide the plate out of the caliper. Discard the spring clip - a new one must be used on refitting.

    2. Using pliers if necessary, withdraw both the inner and outer pads from the caliper. Make a note of the correct fitted position of the anti-rattle springs, and then remove the springs from each pad.

    3. First measure the thickness of the friction material of each brake pad. If either pad is worn at any point to the specified minimum thickness or less, all four pads must be renewed. Also, the pads should be renewed if any are fouled with oil or grease (blah blah more irrelevant stuff about pads)

    4. Prior to fitting the pads, check that the guide sleeves are free to slide easily in the caliper body, and check that the rubber guide sleeve gaiters are undamaged. Brush the dust and dirt from the caliper and piston, but do not inhale it (damn!), as it is injurious to health (yeah yeah.....ill smoke it next time!)

    5. If the new brake pads are fitted, it will be necessary to retract the piston fully into the caliper bore, by rotating it in a clockwise direction. This can be acheived using a suitable square section bar such as the shaft of a screwdriver, which locates snugly into the caliper piston slots. Provided that the master cylinder reservoir has not been overfilled with hydraulic fluid, there should be no spillage, but keep a careful watch on the fluid level while retracting the piston. If the fluid level rises above the max level line at any time, the surplus should be siphoned off.

  3. #3
    1000+ Posts brenno's Avatar
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    6. Position the caliper slot so that its piston reference slot (A) is positioned horizontally, above or below the piston groove (B); this is necessary to ensure that the lug on the pad will locate with the piston slot on installation.

    7. The brake pad with the lug on it backing plate is the inner pad. Refit the anti rattle springs to the pads so that when the pads are fitted in the caliper, the spring end will be located at the opposite end of the pad, in relation to the pad retaining plate.

    8. Locate the outer brake pad in the caliper body, ensuring that its friction material is against the brake disc. Slider the inner pad into position in the caliper, ensuring that the lug in its backing plate is aligned with the slot in the caliper piston.

    9. Ensure that the anti-rattle spring ends on both pads are correctly positions, then slide the retaining plate into place and secure it in position with a new spring clip. It may be necessary to file an extra chamfer on the edge of the retaining plate to enable it to be fitted without difficulty.

    10. Depress the brake pedal repeatedly intil the pads are pressed into firm contact with the disc, and normal pedal pressure is restored. Check that the inner pad lug is correctly engaged with one of the caliper piston slots. Repeat above procedure with other rear brake caliper.

    11. Check that the handbrake adjustment cable as described in Section 17 (call me if you need this too) then refit the wheels.

    12. Check fluid level

    Thats about it - hopefully this is helpful. I cut a few bits out as they were irrelevant. If you want to borrow the Manual then let me know. Im about to head off on a trip for 2 weeks - Ill be back in Sydney on the 24th.

    Brendan

  4. #4
    Fellow Frogger!
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    Thanks Brenno, as I suspected you just need to get the extra marker groover in the horizontal position, and the brakes adjust themselves...

    I can't believe they charge $80 to replace these pads...

    I'm attempting to do the front discs and pads next week.

    Cheers,
    Adrian

  5. #5
    Local Tyrant gibgib's Avatar
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    Actually you've prompted me to change my own pads.
    It doesn't void any warranties doing it yourself?

    $80 is a bit rich!

  6. #6
    1000+ Posts PeterT's Avatar
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    I had a similar problem with the rear calipers on my Mi16. It's almost impossible to screw them in without making a tool. Sounds like 306s are very similar. If you've got the tool you can do it on the car, without, you should pull the caliper off, and even then it's very hard. In the end, I was glad I pulled the calipers off, as one guide pin had seized anyway. You can buy an overhaul kit for approx. $35 which includes all new seals, rubber grease etc. If you need guide pins, you need the guide pin kit, another $39. The front pads are very easy in comparison.

    '92 205 Mi16
    '90 Mi16x4

  7. #7
    who? when? huh? GTI124's Avatar
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    $80 to change your pads, plus the pads??? Gee, that is a bit rich. I get my brakes done by the boys at Don Cornell at Bexley (9502 4666). Getting some new ones thrown onto the GTI tomorrow, to be precise! Last time my rears cost $115, and they don't charge any labour...might be because I've been going there forever, but they never charge labour there...

    Hope that helps, if at all...

    - Lincoln
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  8. #8
    Fellow Frogger!
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    Yeah I know!

    $115 sounds reasonable fitted, the OEM replacement pads cost $78.

    It's so easy though, I don't think I'll ever pay for it again, in fact, I'm going to service the car myself from now on - at least I'll know what's done (insteading of paying people to SAY they've done things).

  9. #9
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    I hope you blokes aren't pointing your cars at me in Brisbane, with your untrained,unproffessional brake repairs.You fellow's make me nervous.Changeing oil and plug's ect,Ok,but brakes without any idea?Yikes!

  10. #10
    Fellow Frogger!
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    Unprofessional! Well it was my first time, but please give me a bit of credit mate.

    I think someone here has WAY too much faith in so-called professional workshops - the very first instance that comes to my head is a friend driving out of a Midas workshop and having a wheel fall off 2 blocks down the road.

    It turns out I have half a brain and got it right the first time. Being a cautious fellow, I thought I'd recheck the service manual before driving it.

    I checked it again and it's all fine.

    If a brake workshop does as thorough a job as me, I'd be happy - but who knows what you're paying for?

    Adrian.

    PS - If I changed my plugs, I'd have to undo 24 allen bolts before getting to them, and I'd probably electrocute someone in the process! :p

  11. #11
    1000+ Posts brenno's Avatar
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    For those that dont know NTRX - he is lying.

    He would electrocute at least 2 people in the process, and then call his mum out and electrocute her because it sounds like a funny thing to do.

  12. #12
    Fellow Frogger!
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    ROFLMAO

    You're next Brenno, muhahahahahahahaha!

  13. #13
    Fellow Frogger! racing405's Avatar
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    Tonight is the first time I've had to change rear pads on my 306, I can't remember ever having them changed during service either...

    Had to look for this thread to find out how to retract the pistons. Second side took 15 minutes from jack under to jack back in the boot. Once you take the pad plate off the caliper, you can get at the 306 piston easily and a 1/4" square drive fits perfectly in the slot so you can wind it back in easily.

    I think these pads may have done 220,000km At that rate, I won't wear out a second set of rears.
    Last edited by racing405; 21st April 2016 at 07:25 PM. Reason: typo
    racing 405
    1:59:09 last time at Phillip Island - less than standard Mi16.

  14. #14
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    That's pretty good! On most cars (and without ESP) they last around two or three front pad replacements. Accordingly, the pistons or sliders are commonly seized. If you find your front brakes are wearing more on one side, it sometimes means one of the rears is seized.

    (With ESP I've found the rear pads can wear more quickly than the fronts).


    2003 PEUGEOT 206 GTi

  15. #15
    Fellow Frogger! gromzx's Avatar
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    I've had trouble with the rears on other Peugeot's (like the 407) and needed a tool to wind them in but on my 306 I've always done by hand (with a screw driver). I think the rears on the 306 are stupid easy and I wish more would be like that.
    Just my

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