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Thread: Pod Filter

  1. #1
    Fellow Frogger!
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    Pod Filter

    Hi i was wondering if someone can inform me where i should install my pod filter - i have a 94 306xsi with a standard filter which is tiny!! I was thinking of bypassing the original filter and making a couple of left turns straight to the chamber. what do u think? will i lose power with this as i might have too much air for the amount of fuel in the car? any help would be most appreciated. also the pipe i need to fit the pod filter onto is 8'' is this standard? anyone know if they are pod filters to fit this circumfrence? cheers!

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  2. #2
    Fellow Frogger!
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    You won't have a problem of too much air and leaning out your mixtures - as the standard setup is most likely very close to optimal anyway.

    By fitting the pod filter, you won't get much of a performance increase (if any), but you will get a really cool induction roar.

    By going too big a pipe, what will happen is you'll lose intake air velocity and you will lose power and torque - normally most noticable in the lower rev range.

    Whatever you do, make sure the pod has a source of cold air flowing straight onto it, and preferably make it sealed so it only breathes cold air from outside.

    This will take a bit of work. Before you start, it might be a smart idea to consider whether or not the panel filter is actually part of the inlet restriction (if you actually have any) or if it's the design of the original inlet tract piping - rather than guessing it's too small.

    Hope this helps

    Cheers,
    Adrian

  3. #3
    Fellow Frogger!
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    Why will a pod filter only give a minimal performance increase - if that indeed is what they are designed to do? Maybe it would be better to install an element filter where the original one is - what ya think? If using a pod filter or an element wont incress the performance of my engine - then what will - bearing in mind im wanting to start small and not have to mess around too much. Also on another issue why would my heater not be putting out any hot air? Ive checked the pipes and they are warm - also ive checked the water in the radiator and that too is fine. Im stumped! Any other help you can offer would be fantastic - thanks.

  4. #4
    Fellow Frogger!
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    Sure - if your motor is starved for air due to head & cam modifications, or the intake design was appalling to start off with, a pod filter will help.

    In my opinion it has been a bit of a trend to put on a pod filter since the early 90s when people started doing up Suzuki Swift GTis etc... however mostly the mod was done for the sporty noise.

    I think the trend is starting to falter as people are realising replacement filter elements are more effective combined with sensible inlet tract modifications.

    I suggest getting a subscription to Autospeed (www.autospeed.com) and checking out their numerous articles on modifying your inlet piping.

    You can test which parts are restrictive with a manometer and replace sections with PVC pipe etc, or piping from a larger engine at a wrecker.

    In most cases, if your inlet is restrictive, a very small percentage of it will be due to the filter.

    Do a search on "manometer" and I'm sure you'll find some posts of mine on how to check out your motor with this technique.

    Chances are, using this technique you'll spend a LOT less than the cost of a pod filter/panel filter and you'll actually know if it's doing any good.

    Also, get the car up on a hoist at a good exhaust shop, and look for obvious restrictions - kinks, small diameter pipe sections etc. Replace them accordingly. You should also get a fair gain by replacing the rear muffler with a sensibly sized straight through muffler (2" - it's all you'll need and it won't boom).

    Cheers,
    Adrian

  5. #5
    Fellow Frogger!
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    Ok so a manometer i presume messures the airflow going through the inlets into the filter thus into the engine - correct? How will PVC piping improve airflow - also if i increase the circumfrence of the piping will this mean there is too much air coming through for the amount of fuel?

    "By going too big a pipe, what will happen is you'll lose intake air velocity and you will lose power and torque - normally most noticable in the lower rev range."

    Perhaps i can increase the airflow inlet and not have to increase te size of the piping which flows to the filter?

  6. #6
    Fellow Frogger!
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    Ok so a manometer i presume messures the airflow going through the inlets into the filter thus into the engine - correct? How will PVC piping improve airflow - also if i increase the circumfrence of the piping will this mean there is too much air coming through for the amount of fuel?

    "By going too big a pipe, what will happen is you'll lose intake air velocity and you will lose power and torque - normally most noticable in the lower rev range."
    When checking the exhaust over - does taking the catalytic converter out enhance performance?

    Cheers, Blake

    Perhaps i can increase the airflow inlet and not have to increase te size of the piping which flows to the filter?

  7. #7
    Fellow Frogger!
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    When you rev your motor, air rushes into it due to atmospheric pressure. A bit like your lungs - your lungs don't actually suck in air, when you breathe you increase their capacity and atmospheric pressure causes air to flow into them.

    Once a motor is revving hard enough and under load, the intake air is zooming through the inlet tract and at some point, the inlet piping may not be able to keep up with motor's capacity for air - as there are too many flow obstructions.

    What happens then is a vacuum occurs behind the flow obstruction. A manometer measures this vacuum(or negative pressure), and will indicate to you how serious the flow obstruction is. It is a very useful tool as it will allow you to iron out certain obstructions perfectly.

    After using this method, a minor application of thought is required to work out a suitable diameter replacement pipe to deal with your flow obstructions. Typically you are using the same diameter but getting rid of kinks in the system - a little bit like unkinking a garden hose.

    Seriously, get a subscription to Autospeed as it takes me a long time to repeat all of this stuff that's in there. You'll get pictures, diagrams and explanations which are much better than mine.

    To give you an idea, I worked out on my GTi6 that the total negative pressure in my intake was 14", or 0.5 psi, which equates to SFA @ the wheels.

    Cheers,
    Adrian

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