replacing brake pads
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  1. #1
    nJm
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    replacing brake pads

    This is related to my post on the squeaking rear wheel. I was looking around in the garage and found a new set of rear pads I'd picked up a few months ago when they were on sale at EAI. I'd never replaced pads before but I thought it would be nice and easy. I followed the Haynes manual instructions, removing the thrust spring plate, pad retaining fork and damper spring. However, the next instruction 'Using pliers, withdraw both disc pads' proved to be impossible. Is there another step I need to follow? No matter how hard I tugged on them they wouldn't budge more than a few milimetres. In the end I gave up and put it all back together. The old pads are about half the thickness of the new ones incase that matters.

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    Any ideas?
    Nick
    1983 Peugeot 505 GR


    "All of its cars from the 1.1 litre 205 through the ugly duckling 309 to the 2.2 litre 505 GTi had a rightness and a righteousness about them that turned every humdrum drive into a journey. Someone, I once wrote, in the bowels of Peugeot understands handling and how a chassis should feel." - Jeremy Clarkson

  2. #2
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    Nick, You need to stick a flat bladed screwdriver down the back of the inner pad and rotate the piston about 45 degrees (there is a slot in the piston face), this will release the handbrake mechanism and allow the piston to be moved thus freeing the pad.
    Graham Wallis

  3. #3
    1000+ Posts silverexec's Avatar
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    GRAHAM WALLIS:
    Nick, You need to stick a flat bladed screwdriver down the back of the inner pad and rotate the piston about 45 degrees (there is a slot in the piston face), this will release the handbrake mechanism and allow the piston to be moved thus freeing the pad.
    Graham Wallis
    Hang on, I don't think you can rotate the piston while the pads are still in. The inner pad has a bulge that sticks out and follows the slot in the piston face when the pad is installed or removed. I think this bulge also prevents the piston from rotating and releasing the handbrake mechanism when the pads are installed.

    I'm pretty sure that only after the pads are removed can the piston be rotated.

    When I replaced my rear pads, they were also difficult to remove but after ensuring the handbrake was off and pulling the caliper frame outwards as much as I could (to push the piston inside its housing slightly), using pliers I was able to pull out the outer pad first, then the inner pad. Good luck with it.

    A tip, take notice of which way round the thrust spring plate is originally fitted before removing it, because when it came around for me to refit mine, I wasn't sure which way it was supposed to go in so I took a guess. I don't know if it makes much of a difference though.

    Cheers,
    Richard
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  4. #4
    Guru davemcbean's Avatar
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    This is what I usually do in this situation:

    I get about 25cm of 5mm diameter electrical wire and loop it through the two holes on one of the pads and then tie a reef knot in it. I then attach a hook from a slide hammer to the wire and hammer away. Nine times out of ten the pad comes straight out. If necessary I do the same for the other pad.

    In one or two extreme cases I've had to remove the caliper, but as I said the slide hammer trick usually works.

    I then tap a screw driver or punch to rotate the piston 45 degrees so I can push it back far enough to fit the new pads, then rotate it back 45 degrees. Then I fit the new pads.

    Dave

    <small>[ 09 August 2003, 09:25 PM: Message edited by: davemcbean ]</small>
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  5. #5
    1000+ Posts Rod Hagen's Avatar
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    Another little tip.

    Make sure that the brake fluid level in the reservoir isn't too high when you push the piston back in so that you can remove the shoes. If its overfull (or even right on the max level) you may force brake fluid back out of the top of the reservoir.

    Cheers

    Rod
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  6. #6
    nJm
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    The brake pedal has gone really hard and it only takes a moderate prod of the middle pedal to lock up the rear wheel in question. My mechanic rekons the piston in the caliper has gone. At the moment I've swapped over to driving a V6 Magna as my daily driver... (although I must admit I love cruise control!).
    Nick
    1983 Peugeot 505 GR


    "All of its cars from the 1.1 litre 205 through the ugly duckling 309 to the 2.2 litre 505 GTi had a rightness and a righteousness about them that turned every humdrum drive into a journey. Someone, I once wrote, in the bowels of Peugeot understands handling and how a chassis should feel." - Jeremy Clarkson

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