coolant for an alloy lump
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  1. #1
    Fellow Frogger! enthused!'s Avatar
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    Default coolant for an alloy lump

    lo everyone..

    My mi16 seems to be loosing a bit of coolant, not sure where yet, but its going in for a MAJOR (dont ask - there goes my tax return!) service next week. I just had a little question on coolant.

    Is it bad to put water in to top up the coolant level? Even if its just to get me by??

    What sort of coolant do you need to use with an alloy block?

    whats the difference between a $10 bottle and a $50 bottle of coolant??


    and another question...

    theres a rubber pipe somewhere above the engine (cant tell you right now - cos im not looking at it, but it sticks out the top somewhere..) which ends in what looks like a european bicycle tyre valve.

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    My old mechanic didnt like it (bloody wierd french car) and plugged the tube with a bolt and a hose clamp.

    Is this bad?

    what is the function of this little valve?


    thanks in advance..


    1992 mi16 1.9 litre - it's a love hate realtionship.

    whatever you do NEVER tell anyone your car is reliable. doesn't matter how much wood you touch!

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  2. #2
    sans witticism SLC206's Avatar
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    The valve is part of the bleed system to ensure that all the air is bled out of the cooling system when you change the coolant. There maybe one or two that (using the "correct maintenance procedure") you close off at various points when you are replacing the coolant to ensure the system is adequately filled with coolant and not air.

    To answer your first question, I would just top it up with water. I wouldn't worry too much about diluting the coolant by topping it up with water to get you to its next service - but even that can open a can of worms in a forum like this. Some will insist on it being distilled water only, and others (like me) don't think it matters too much
    Regards,

    Simon

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  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by SLC206
    To answer your first question, I would just top it up with water. I wouldn't worry too much about diluting the coolant by topping it up with water to get you to its next service - but even that can open a can of worms in a forum like this. Some will insist on it being distilled water only, and others (like me) don't think it matters too much
    I've just had to replace a six year old Dorf Flickmixer tap which is made from solid brass, because the stem pipe had corroded through from the inside out and the user was getting sprayed. It matters here in WA, at least.
    Last edited by Stuey; 22nd August 2004 at 03:07 PM.

  4. #4
    Too many posts! JohnW's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by enthused!
    lo everyone..

    My mi16 seems to be loosing a bit of coolant, not sure where yet, but its going in for a MAJOR (dont ask - there goes my tax return!) service next week. I just had a little question on coolant.

    Is it bad to put water in to top up the coolant level? Even if its just to get me by??

    What sort of coolant do you need to use with an alloy block?

    whats the difference between a $10 bottle and a $50 bottle of coolant??


    and another question...

    theres a rubber pipe somewhere above the engine (cant tell you right now - cos im not looking at it, but it sticks out the top somewhere..) which ends in what looks like a european bicycle tyre valve.

    My old mechanic didnt like it (bloody wierd french car) and plugged the tube with a bolt and a hose clamp.

    Is this bad?

    what is the function of this little valve?


    thanks in advance..


    Stuey,

    Well we've all been here before..... Personally, I'd top up with demineralised water - not expensive. Perth water is pretty good but it is a few hundred mg/L total salinity and does have free chlorine which will be corrosive I guess.

    I use Peugeot coolant or BP coolant. Full stop. I presume your Mi16 has the cast iron block so block corrosion isn't the big issue that the alloy blocks have, but there's lots of other alloy and the odd radiator to consider.......

    Can you email me, just out of curiosity, to tell me to whom you entrust the car?

    Cheers

    JohnW

  5. #5
    Fellow Frogger! Decca's Avatar
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    Stuey,
    I agree with JohnW. When you get two different metals with a fluid between them, you get basically a crude battery cell. Therefore you get a small current flow which is electrolysis which means one metal gets eaten away.

    Welsch plugs are, from my understanding, made of material to be the 'sacrificial anode' (as on boat hulls) so that they are eaten away and not other parts of the engine. The plugs being easy/easier to replace ( If you can get to all of them that is).

    Anyway, I always use Distilled/demineralised water and good brand name quality coolant at a good ratio , ie not diluted too much.There are too many dissimilar metals in a modern engine to risk using poor coolant .
    Decca
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    John, were you referring to me in your post above, or "enthused!"? I think you meant to ask who he/she used as their mechanic...?

    Same with you Decca...for what it's worth, I always use distilled water, in case my post above wasn't clear.
    Stuey

  7. #7
    Too many posts! JohnW's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Stuey
    John, were you referring to me in your post above, or "enthused!"? I think you meant to ask who he/she used as their mechanic...?

    Same with you Decca...for what it's worth, I always use distilled water, in case my post above wasn't clear.
    Stuey
    Stuey,

    Not exactly. I was curious, off-web, to know to whom you were entrusting the new car for a major service. There aren't many in Perth.....

    Cheers

    John

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    Hi John,

    I don't think there's an issue if I say on here that I'd go to Euromotive.

    However, I generally tackle most things once I'm comfortable with a car. A clutch job at 7.5 hours labour for qualified personnel sounds pretty big, though! I assume this is an engine out job.

    Stuey

  9. #9
    Moderator Alan S's Avatar
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    Just thought I'd throw my in here.
    If the car is leaking badly, there's no point in spending mega bucks on an expensive coolant and if it's only for a couple of days, then use tap water as a 'get me by' but no way in the World do you use tap water on a long term basis; that is absolute lunacy.
    Tap waters by & large contain salt as well as shwing a strong acid ph and will cause massive corrosion within a short space of time...say 6 months in some cases.
    The froggies all have systems that require the air bleeding from them and any mechanic who thinks they don't need it should be avoided at all costs.
    Not only do ethylene glycol coolants need to be used in the systems but they also need to be used in the proportions as recommended by the manufacturers and changed at the specified intervals. Any concentrates should be diluted using distilled water or water that has been through a reverse osmosis treatment.
    I posted this on the archive of complaints and tips recently and I'd suggest you read it as it was written by experts in the fied but condensed by yours truly.

    http://www.aussiefrogs.com/forum/sho...724#post128724


    Alan S
    If it ain't broke, use a 12" shifter.....that usually does the trick!!

  10. #10
    Too many posts! JohnW's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Stuey
    Hi John,

    I don't think there's an issue if I say on here that I'd go to Euromotive.

    However, I generally tackle most things once I'm comfortable with a car. A clutch job at 7.5 hours labour for qualified personnel sounds pretty big, though! I assume this is an engine out job.

    Stuey
    I'm sure that's no issue at all!! One of the very few places to trust in my view.

  11. #11
    Budding Architect ???? pugrambo's Avatar
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    what's the concensus on straight rain water mixed with the correct coolant ???
    3 x '78 604 SL

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  12. #12
    Moderator Alan S's Avatar
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    Second best option depending on the purity of the rain water and what it was stored in.
    For instance, a coastal area where I am will be slightly salty on most occasions whereas an area where there is surf should have a higher content due to spray. This may not be a problem in rural areas but then if there's any agriculture, what else could be in it?
    If the tank is the old corrugated iron variety or a colourbond type, this in some instances could introduce properties from the metals the tank is made from, whilst a concrete tank will send the ph into alkaline.
    I think the safest option using rain water is possibly the one I have which is a 15 year old colourbond roof going into a fairly new plastic tank.
    That's working on the assumption that one day it may rain; last time we saw a drop was May.


    Alan S
    If it ain't broke, use a 12" shifter.....that usually does the trick!!

  13. #13
    Budding Architect ???? pugrambo's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Alan S
    Second best option depending on the purity of the rain water and what it was stored in.
    For instance, a coastal area where I am will be slightly salty on most occasions whereas an area where there is surf should have a higher content due to spray. This may not be a problem in rural areas but then if there's any agriculture, what else could be in it?
    If the tank is the old corrugated iron variety or a colourbond type, this in some instances could introduce properties from the metals the tank is made from, whilst a concrete tank will send the ph into alkaline.
    I think the safest option using rain water is possibly the one I have which is a 15 year old colourbond roof going into a fairly new plastic tank.
    That's working on the assumption that one day it may rain; last time we saw a drop was May.


    Alan S

    ok

    so on that advice i have been using rain water straight from the sky into clean plastic drums

    i live in a rural area but away from farms as such so the rain water comes straight off an iron roof into a plastic drum and stored away from light and then when it is used it is filtered before entering the radiator

    so in all that i'd say my water i use is pretty good along with a good coolant

    i have been uusing the said rain water in the 604 untill it blew the head gasket but i will be using it again in the car when it all goes back in so i should be ok in that case
    3 x '78 604 SL

    1 x 2018 3008

    1 x 2000 Citroen XM,

    1 x '98 306 GTi6 sadly sold

    1 x secret project

    1 x '98 406 STDT troop carrier and i don't care if it stinks, i don't sniff it's arse Death by wank tank

    1 x '99 406SV 5spd wagon, time to burn more fuel

    1 x 1994 605 SV3.0

  14. #14
    Moderator Alan S's Avatar
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    I would say so.
    I saw another interesting thing a week or two back. SuperCheap are now selling a coolant that is purple; probably nothing so magical about that as the Toyota "Genuine" stuff was that colour years ago, thing with this is that when it changes colour (ie) goes a gold colour, it's time to get changed.
    Could possibly be the way of the future, but I'd imagine this stuff is a pre-mix and don't know if it will or can be sold as a concentrate and then mixed with the water.

    Alan S
    If it ain't broke, use a 12" shifter.....that usually does the trick!!

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    Budding Architect ???? pugrambo's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Alan S
    I would say so.
    I saw another interesting thing a week or two back. SuperCheap are now selling a coolant that is purple; probably nothing so magical about that as the Toyota "Genuine" stuff was that colour years ago, thing with this is that when it changes colour (ie) goes a gold colour, it's time to get changed.
    Could possibly be the way of the future, but I'd imagine this stuff is a pre-mix and don't know if it will or can be sold as a concentrate and then mixed with the water.

    Alan S

    i'll stick to the green stuff

    it's a lot easier to see when you have a leak than purple i would say as the purple could blend into the dirt colour most engines become over time

    that and i also change my coolant every 18months or so anyway so i don't need a colour changing coolant to let me know it's time to change

    be interesting to see though

    well i have just enough rain water to do the 604 when the engine returns to it's home in the engine bay so if i need anymore i'll either have to get some distilled water or hope it rains again
    3 x '78 604 SL

    1 x 2018 3008

    1 x 2000 Citroen XM,

    1 x '98 306 GTi6 sadly sold

    1 x secret project

    1 x '98 406 STDT troop carrier and i don't care if it stinks, i don't sniff it's arse Death by wank tank

    1 x '99 406SV 5spd wagon, time to burn more fuel

    1 x 1994 605 SV3.0

  16. #16
    Fellow Frogger! Decca's Avatar
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    Thanks for your tech info Alan S. We learn good things through AF even when your profession is in the same field. My general rule about distilled water is to keep away from all metals. pure water wont conduct electricity whereas mineralised water will.
    Getting back to electrolysis in cars, does negative chassis earthing, in your view, help the coolant situation?

    Decca
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  17. #17
    Moderator Alan S's Avatar
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    Sean,

    It's so serious up here that I can't even brew my beer or even wine I can buy reverse osmosis water from the guy who has an oil depot that I know for $1 a litre.
    Decca, the negative earth situation I couldn't really comment on but the info I was given re the conductivity did make comment that in some cases adding earths can at times be counter productive.
    Why, I don't think they say but I'll run back through it again first chance I get in case I missed something.

    Alan S
    If it ain't broke, use a 12" shifter.....that usually does the trick!!

  18. #18
    Fellow Frogger! Decca's Avatar
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    Alan S
    Yes, multiple earthing does create problems in that you get earth loops.
    Some paths to earth are of different resistances hence you get current flows in loops.
    In Telstra exchanges all equipment now is electrically isolated and all earthing is run back to a single point, whereas it used to be earthed via the mounting point hardware and therefore you had earth loops everywhere.

    Decca
    Present --2016 2008 Outdoor / 2014 RAV4 Diesel (My utilitarian beast)

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