505 - Now it won't go - Page 2
  • Register
  • Help
Page 2 of 2 First 12
Results 26 to 37 of 37
Like Tree7Likes

Thread: 505 - Now it won't go

  1. #26
    VIP Sponsor
    Join Date
    Aug 2000
    Posts
    8,821

    Default

    More important though that they don't work below 3500. If you climb a highway hill at 3500 or above they will climb in 5th without loss in speed. Below this and you're changing back through the gears. XC has good torque spread and will rev to near 7000.

    Advertisement

  2. #27
    Fellow Frogger! TassieExec's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    Devonport Tas.
    Posts
    353

    Default

    Sorry to hear of all of your drama's but pleased you finally got it done, however I must admit to some concerns about leaving a bolt not and only one nut on the bracket, I think there's every chance it will come back to haunt you in the future. I am also disappointed that you now have a poor view of 505's and a mistaken belief as to their complexity and design, all of which the I'm sure could have been avoided if you had had someone experienced to guide and assist you in the job. The fat is that this is really not that difficult a job if you know what you are doing and have the right equipment, I have done this job many times and can easily do it in around one hour, anyway, I trust things work out better for you the future.
    Regards
    Neil
    Last edited by TassieExec; 3rd July 2018 at 03:17 PM. Reason: Spelling
    cjl likes this.

  3. #28
    Fellow Frogger!
    Join Date
    Jun 2014
    Location
    Sydney, NSW
    Posts
    238

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by TassieExec View Post
    Sorry to hear of all of your drama's but pleased you finally got it done, however I must admit to some concerns about leaving a bolt not and only one nut on the bracket, I think there's every chance it will come back to haunt you in the future. I am also disappointed that you now have a poor view of 505's and a mistaken belief as to their complexity and design, all of which the I'm sure could have been avoided if you had had someone experienced to guide and assist you in the job. The fat is that this is really not that difficult a job if you know what you are doing and have the right equipment, I have done this job many times and can easily do it in around one hour, anyway, I trust things work out better for you the future.
    Regards
    Neil
    Thanks Neil,

    you're probably right - by nature I'm very reticent to fiddle around with anything not directly related to the task at hand. I'll try & explain. Let's suppose I did know that the Rad bracket's strong enough to hold up the front of the car (I didn't before this & would be unwilling to get under a vehicle not properly supported). So now I need to loosen the crossmember, but not too much else I'll be crushed just the same. Oh, and the steering coupling which (of course is going to be AOK with the disturbance & go back in like nothing had happened - yehhhhh, mayyyybe). And don't forget when doing back up the crossmember be sure to use special load-sensitive washers to avoid overtightening {available from Acmedoddle Fasteners, Lithuania, open every Wednesday Arvo. 2:30 - 4:00, no wbsite - how's your Lithuanian), don't be thinking you'll use your torquewrench, oh nononononono no. So what's my chances of completing the job without significant injury & without blocking the driveway with a dead car waiting for three weeks for some new unrelated part to turn up from Europe that you wouldn't have needed if you hadn't disturbed (aka 'blissful ignorance). Yep I'm not comfortable with all the missing bolts, but how long before this 'secondhand' starter also gives up the ghost? Every other car I've ever had the starter motor was about a 10 minute job - pull off a couple of wires, two bolts, bingo. Just can't believe Peugeot have made it so difficult in a roomy conventional N~S layout car.

    Just to harp on about the consequence of disturbing things - another job that utterly burned me was rewiring my previous TA. Everyone I spoke to said "easy job, just be methodical, follow the colour coding - she'll be right." The whole thing took me about three months of working (most) weekends - it wasn't fitting the new cabling, was the fact that everything it plugged into needed cleaning, fettling, repairing, refurbishing, replacing with unobtainable spares - the 'collateral damage' was massive - and one of the few good parts of the car, the headlining, whilst in the right place, looked like shit when I'd finished, somehow think they're not made to be put back again. I'm not so much "if it ain't broke don't fix it" as "if it ain't broke don't even touch it." Ah well, enough philosophy for now.

    As an aside, from being determined to exhibit the thing at the upcoming French car day with an enormous "For Sale" sign on the roof driving (505) down to Sydney early one rainy morning this week I'd just passed a truck & keen to get back into the left lane before all the impatient b******ds tailgated me suddenly realised there was a large plastic bag I was about to run into. Now there was probably nothing more solid than wind in that bag but I put in a huge swerve to the right in the middle of a RH bend in the rain which it accomplished with just a slight slide from the rear wheels - impressive - maybe it's a keeper after all - depends what mood I'm in on the day.
    Balders
    Last edited by baldrick56; 5th July 2018 at 08:44 AM. Reason: increase rant-factor
    Armidillo likes this.
    may all your plans be cunning ones,
    Baldrick,

    fleet: 1989 Peugeot 505 GTi Wagon
    1969 Peugeot 404 Sedan
    2003 Smart 452 Roadster
    2005 MG ZR160
    1988 Mercedes 300E
    1953 Citroen 15CV (under Restoration)
    1953 Bristol 401 (under Restoration)
    That's one for each day of the week - I really should stop

  4. #29
    1000+ Posts Beano's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Location
    Brisbane
    Posts
    2,835

    Default

    ^ It must also have good tyres. I used to love having cars following me on windy roads and then see them struggle to keep up with me on the bends.

    I could take out the starter in a 504 in 5 mins. And my Series 1 505. But the Series 1 GTI was like your Series 2....a real bugger. Not to mention all the pipes and tubes in the engine bay.
    I briefly owned a 1992 GTI wagon, and sold it....too complex. And I didn't like the way the dizzie was hidden under the inlet manifold.
    baldrick56 likes this.

  5. #30
    Fellow Frogger!
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Location
    Tooradin Victoria
    Posts
    204

    Default

    Baldrick Old Son: As a fully sworn (often!) member of the 505 Masochist Owners' Club I'm with you. Anybody for a Toyota?

    You have my deepest sympathy.
    baldrick56 likes this.

  6. #31
    1000+ Posts robmac's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Melbourne / Caulfield
    Posts
    18,043

    Default

    Anybody for a Toyota?
    Toyota TCR 11 Tarago and the later FWD Tagago are monsters to access the starter too.

    The former needs the cross member to be lowered. The latter has front wheel drive access syndrome.

    On my TCR11 (egg shape) I ended up replacing solenoid contacts with the starter still on the vehicle.

    So In choosing a Toyota over a 505 , you may be jumping from the frying pan into the fire.
    Departed the Aussie Frogs Community 14 September 2018.

    The moderator/leader should not operate for the sole benefit of himself and his kind but for the benefit of the people at large and of the AF Fraternity and its patterns, as becomes what he perceives as fitting into place, into his sense of natural justice.
    with apologies to Judy Grahn

  7. #32
    VIP Sponsor
    Join Date
    Aug 2000
    Posts
    8,821

    Default

    I think the later 505s were the pits as far as Peugeot reliability goes, although electronics problems in the 307s were up there.

    Quote Originally Posted by DeeCee View Post
    Baldrick Old Son: As a fully sworn (often!) member of the 505 Masochist Owners' Club I'm with you. Anybody for a Toyota?

    You have my deepest sympathy.

  8. #33
    Fellow Frogger!
    Join Date
    Jun 2014
    Location
    Sydney, NSW
    Posts
    238

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by GRAHAM WALLIS View Post
    I think the later 505s were the pits as far as Peugeot reliability goes, although electronics problems in the 307s were up there.
    I'd say any peugeot after about the year 2000 comes into that category (little bit controversial this is going to be ). I'm basing this on the 206 we 'inherited' for a while about 6 years ago - constant electrical gremlins, sunroof leaked like a sieve depending what 'angle' you parked at. Lightweight structure (OK I'm sure it passed all the crash tests but no residual strength a la Peugeots of old - maybe 205 wasn't so hot on that aspect either). Was I ever glad to see it go - replaced with a "Holden" Astra (TS shape), open the lid on that & the nameplate was stamped 'Adam Opel AG.' It served us well for several years, still going strong in the custody of my stepson.

    Anyway to get back on rant (topic), if I do semi-remove the crossmember (if for instance Summer comes, I'm in a reaalllly good mood, have forgotten the pain of the starter & want to grovel about under the 505 with my 4mm die to clean up the thread on the bracket) can it be absolutely guaranteed the chassis will still be in alignment when it all goes back? or do I need to budget a '4 wheel alignment' check / adjust at my local tyre-robbers?

    Another aside, I treated the thing to new engine oil & filter yesterday (hardly 'treated' it was 1,000K overdue), was pleasantly surprised I could do that without having to remove the cylinder head, or take out all the windows.

    Happy fixing

    Rob
    may all your plans be cunning ones,
    Baldrick,

    fleet: 1989 Peugeot 505 GTi Wagon
    1969 Peugeot 404 Sedan
    2003 Smart 452 Roadster
    2005 MG ZR160
    1988 Mercedes 300E
    1953 Citroen 15CV (under Restoration)
    1953 Bristol 401 (under Restoration)
    That's one for each day of the week - I really should stop

  9. #34
    VIP Sponsor
    Join Date
    Aug 2000
    Posts
    8,821

    Default

    Not had any problem at all with 205 strength. After 15 years of rallying them no problem with the body cracks I used to get all the time with 404s and 504s.

  10. #35
    Fellow Frogger!
    Join Date
    Jun 2014
    Location
    Sydney, NSW
    Posts
    238

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by GRAHAM WALLIS View Post
    Not had any problem at all with 205 strength. After 15 years of rallying them no problem with the body cracks I used to get all the time with 404s and 504s.
    just to play devil's advocate - could it be that the 'roll cage' (I'm guessing it has one for rallying?) is doing all the heavy lifting and the remainder of the body is just a lightweight 'adornment' hung off the edges of the cage Look I know diddly-squat about rallying but when you see one of the international 'big boys' have a mega wipeout on the telly, the car's often still going as a spaceframe with tattered bits of GRP? flapping about in the aftermath.

    I had a 205 (D) in the 'nineties' did many kms in it - reliable & fun to drive (yes even the diesel!), my parents had a newer one (same model) - my Mum was 'T-boned' in it one day, fortunately lowish 'suburban' speed, she was OK, car was a write off. Again a masterpiece of design 'fit for purpose' when the purpose is passing an 'NCAP' test, but everything else pared down to nought - used to reckon if I had a flat on a rear wheel don't bother with the jack - could just about pick it up
    may all your plans be cunning ones,
    Baldrick,

    fleet: 1989 Peugeot 505 GTi Wagon
    1969 Peugeot 404 Sedan
    2003 Smart 452 Roadster
    2005 MG ZR160
    1988 Mercedes 300E
    1953 Citroen 15CV (under Restoration)
    1953 Bristol 401 (under Restoration)
    That's one for each day of the week - I really should stop

  11. #36
    VIP Sponsor
    Join Date
    Aug 2000
    Posts
    8,821

    Default

    No, not all my cars have had cages. The present Si that I'm using for events where cages aren't required is holding up fine, has seen some very rough roads, gone through a set of the big Koni yellows on the rear, but no sign of cracking even on the b pillar.
    baldrick56 likes this.

  12. #37
    Fellow Frogger!
    Join Date
    Jun 2014
    Location
    Sydney, NSW
    Posts
    238

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by ianrobbo View Post
    My 505 GTi sedan Douvrin engine pulls to 6500 very well with its extractor system
    must be something weird about mine, most of the time it gets driven relatively gently but recently it's been getting a darn good thrashing (partly my pique with the starter debacle, partly cos I've got to either kill that squealing waterpump or 'cure' it - dammit I've been driving around for three months now with that spare pump in the boot and nothing's changed - worked a treat on the 404 which has stayed quiet ever since I placed the spare in the boot). Anyway I've noticed there's no gain in hanging on more than 4,500rpm in second (maybe slightly more in third). Did they fit the wagons with a different cam? or are the lobes on mine so worn down after 210K kM that it's changed the characteristics?
    Balders
    may all your plans be cunning ones,
    Baldrick,

    fleet: 1989 Peugeot 505 GTi Wagon
    1969 Peugeot 404 Sedan
    2003 Smart 452 Roadster
    2005 MG ZR160
    1988 Mercedes 300E
    1953 Citroen 15CV (under Restoration)
    1953 Bristol 401 (under Restoration)
    That's one for each day of the week - I really should stop

Page 2 of 2 First 12

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •