2008 Peugeot 308 XSE (2L HDI)
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Thread: 2008 Peugeot 308 XSE (2L HDI)

  1. #1
    Tadpole
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    Default 2008 Peugeot 308 XSE (2L HDI)

    Hi All

    I'm after a 2nd runabout for the family and wanted something with a bit more class than the likes of Mazda/Toyota etc. A 2008 308 XSE 2L diesel with ~130,000Km on the odometer has caught my eye and it seems to be pretty well regarded in terms of reliability. 1 owner and always serviced with Peugeot. Asking just shy of 8k.

    I understand parts and servicing will always cost a bit more than Jap/Korean cars, but I just thought I'd reach out to the community for tips of anything specific to look out for before taking the plunge. Any major services that should have been done or about to be required? Common faults?

    I really appreciate any advice on offer.

    Cheers

    HH

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  2. #2
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    2008 would be the DW10B engine - look for RHR in the VIN at the 6th character. It is a well regarded reliable motor. If it is mated to a 6 speed auto, then that is by Aisin in Japan and has a good record also. The combination drives extremely well.

    Being a diesel with particle filter correct oil and servicing is important.

    Actually French cars are reasonable for service and repair - mine have been cheaper than Japanese and Korean. The trick is to know the places that import European parts for these cars (eg EAI: European Auto Imports and several others), and to find the independent mechanics who know the vehicles and have the software. AF members in Qld can put you onto them. The electrics that motoring writers love to comment on are actually by Bosch and are in the German makes they love as well! I have found them to be reliable.

    Like all modern designs, they are completely computerised, both for engine functions and body accessories.

  3. #3
    Tadpole
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    Thanks, seasink - good information. I can confirm it is the DW10B and auto.

    Hopefully considering servicing to date has been done by a Peugeot dealer, correct oil has always been used and the DPF is all good. Given its age (in years) I noticed it will be due/just overdue for a cam belt change, but not given its KM (due at 180,000?). Will be interesting to check the log book and see if it was done. If not, a point for price negotiations I guess.

  4. #4
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    I haven't got a Peugeot Service book for that car, but that engine when fitted to a contemporary Citroen had a recommended belt change at 4 years/100,000km. In 2012 it was raised to 9 years/180,000km when the more powerful 2.0L DW10C (RHH) engine arrived. In those days Cit and Peugeot had different distributors. Make sure you know what the state of yopur car is.

    Another thing to watch is the additive tank for the particle filter regeneration catalyst. They recommend a level check at 80,000 km, with the tank expected to last to about 160,000 km. The cerium compound used isn't dirt cheap, but is available through independent suppliers. The filter regeneration will not occur automatically on a diet of short urban trips - it needs a sustained run at moderate or higher speeds, like a motorway drive every now and again. It can be forced in a workshop.

    Chack the battery age. They last about 5 years, and are high rated units.
    Last edited by seasink; 14th June 2018 at 01:56 PM.

  5. #5
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    It's now hard to find the original PSA blurb on the engine online now, so I burst my copy. I hope it's helpful
    2.0-litre HDi Diesel Engine (DW10BTED4 – FAP)

    With a capacity of 1,997 cm3 (bore 85 mm, stroke 88 mm), this engine features a Garrett variable geometry turbocharger with a vacuum-controlled discharge valve equipped with a front-mounted air/air exchanger. It develops a maximum power of 100 kW at 4,000 rpm and a maximum torque of 320 Nm at 2,000 rpm. The torque can attain 340 Nm at 2,000 rpm thanks to the "overboost" function, which comes into play with the engine under full load between 1,750 and 3,200 rpm. This temporary increase in torque is available in all six gears with the manual 6-speed gearbox, and in the final three gears with the automatic 4-speed box.

    Cylinder block

    The DW 10BTED4 engine has a cast iron block with cylinders inserted at the foundry. The forged steel crankshaft is supported by five bearings, and on the distribution side is fitted with an AVT pulley (Torsion Vibration Damping) which drives the cooling compressor and the alternator. On the opposite side, the design of the increased inertia double flywheel absorbs the natural acyclic effects of the four cylinder engine. The flat head alloy pistons act as a combustion chamber and have four bevelled shoulders to avoid contact with the valves. Their design ensures a good mixture of air and fuel.

    The shot-peened, "screwed" forged alloy con rods have a trapezoid foot which increases the support area of the shaft in the piston (better distribution of forces).

    Cylinder head

    The head is a complex component exposed to very high stresses from the temperature variations and the combustion pressure in the chamber (160 bar). Made from aluminium alloy, it has two overhead camshafts which are no longer made of cast iron but with forged steel cams mounted on a tube also made of steel. The four valves per cylinder are positioned vertically. The exhaust camshaft is driven by a toothed belt 25.4 mm wide linked to the crankshaft and water pump. A tensioner pulley and a roller pulley complete the drive system. The intake camshaft is driven via a metal timing chain linked to the exhaust camshaft and tensioned by a hydraulic tensioner. The camshafts activate the valves via roller cam followers, and the hydraulic tappets automatically absorb any play. The head integrates two independent types of intake air channel per cylinder: "helicoidal" for the short circuit and "tangential" for the longer circuit. The helicoidal channel causes a turbulent air movement (swirl) necessary for a good mixture of air/injected fuel in the combustion chamber. The tangential channel is known as the "flow" channel as it gives the gaseous mass greater axial dynamism while ensuring a rotation effect. These two intake air channels work simultaneously. The aerodynamic design of these foundry-cast channels is optimised by precision machining to avoid dispersion.

    The intake air distributor contains the cylinder head and oil separator. Made of glass-fibre reinforced polyamide, it has a stylish acoustic engine cover held on the assembly by four studs. The intake butterfly, like the turbo compressor, is controlled by a vacuum circuit integrated into the engine. The vacuum pump is placed at the end of the intake camshaft.

    High pressure injection

    The common rail, high pressure, direct injection system has an electronically controlled high pressure pump placed at the end of the exhaust camshaft. In the common rail, the internal pressure can vary between 250 bar and 1,650 bar depending on the demand from the engine management software. The rail is connected to Siemens injectors controlled independently by the ECU and fitted with a "piezo-electric" control head. They have six very small diameter holes (around 120 ) which ensure ultrafine atomisation directly into the combustion chamber. The unique feature of this injector technology is the control head which allows optimum metering of the fuel quantity and injection duration. Like the 1.6-litre engine, the DW10 BTED4 uses a multiple injection technique managing six different injections.

    Environmental performance

    Thanks to its design, the diesel engine offers the best thermodynamic efficiency. Furthermore the very high pressure injection of the common rail system allows extremely fine atomisation of the fuel in the chamber for very homogeneous, and hence complete, combustion. This gives improved combustion efficiency which, while reducing emissions at source, easily complies with Euro 4 emissions standards. This engine has an exhaust gas recycling system EGR which reduces the quantity of nitrous oxide (Nox) in the exhaust gases. To improve dynamics, the electrically controlled EGR valve is managed by the engine ECU as a function of the following criteria: engine speed and load given by the angular position of the electric accelerator pedal, intake air temperature and flow rate. To complete the gas processing, an oxidation catalyst is fitted as close as possible to the cylinder head in order to benefit from the highest exhaust temperatures which promote emission control. During cold starting, a "thermomanagement" system optimises the engine heating to reduce emissions and fuel consumption. To achieve this, a valve in the engine coolant circuit controlled by the ECU adjusts the coolant flow as a function of the following parameters: engine load and speed, temperature of the coolant and engine air, and coolant temperature at the heater matrix. The engine is cooled by a radiator with aluminium core of surface area 21 dm2 and a motorised fan with diameter 370 mm and power 525 W for the manual version, and 600 W for the automatic. It is controlled by the ECU. A 12-fin oil/water exchanger on the engine block is strapped to an "ecological" filter cartridge. This system, in which only the filter element is changed to facilitate recycling, avoids oil drips during servicing.
    tazfrog likes this.

  6. #6
    Tadpole
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    Thanks again seasink. Nice blurb. Have to say I'm a little nervous reading over the past year of 308 T7 related posts here with various issues, but also need to remind myself people don't post on forums when they're not having problems.

    On my list of checks for Saturday:

    1) Service History
    2) Cam Belt/Water Pump History
    3) DPF regen catalyst bladder, condition and history (Any idea where to find this?)
    4) Rear main oil seal (Any idea where to find this?)
    5) Vaccum tubes "Y" junction cracks
    6) Any odd noise(s) on cold startup


    Anything else come to mind?

    Is it worth bringing my OBD2 tool to look at any codes via my phone and generic OBD2 software or is specialized software required?

    Cheers
    Last edited by hophead; 14th June 2018 at 04:01 PM.

  7. #7
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    The regen catalyst is stored under the floor, in front of the rear left wheel. You can't tell what's in a tank from the outside, that needs the maker's software.

    The rear main oil seal is where the crankshaft pokes through the block to join the flywheel or torque converter and is hidden. The gearbox casing has an opening under the torque converter, and any leakage will come out under tthe bottom.

    There's no harm getting an OBD2 reading, but a generic tool will only give error code numbers and won't read the various values from sensors stored in the system, whether in error, or on the way to abnormal. Some codes may be historic, so you would need to clear them all, start the engine, and then see what is current. Some "faults" are ignorable, such as a low oil level on startup - the sensor is notoriously iffy, and the dipstick doesn't lie.

    The engine is actually very reliable. The Y piece is aging plastic in a minor component, but loss of vacuum control means trouble with the turbo and EGR systems.
    tazfrog likes this.

  8. #8
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    Default 308 touring

    My daughter has a 308 touring that she has had since 2011. Now has just over 130k. Has been serviced by Pug specialist (not always dealer). Had the auto serviced by quality auto specialist at 120k. Oil was quite dirty and took a lot of oil to get it "clean".
    Has gone through a new battery every 3 years. Car is mostly used for daily commutes.
    Very reliable, no issues. Nose is low and often fouls gutters etc.
    I'm going to get the timing belt/water pump done this year...will cost close to $1k.
    I would recommend but I would not pay anywhere near asking price...

  9. #9
    Tadpole
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    Thank you both for the tips and advice.

    Any thoughts on the asking price ($7900) assuming general condition and service history (inc timing/cam belt) is good?

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