What 505 Models are still available
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Thread: What 505 Models are still available

  1. #1
    Fellow Frogger!
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    Default What 505 Models are still available

    Greetings

    I'm planning to buy another classic car in about 6 months. I want a comfortable spacious long distance touring car that good to drive

    I've long been fond of the 505s and I think they are a great practical classic.

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    But I have no idea of what models were sold and what still survives today in good order?

    I've heard of the Turbo Diesels with allow wheels and the STi and GTi. Not quite sure what the difference between the GTi and STi is.

    I'd really like power steering, air conditioning and alloy wheels. Little boot deck spoilers a nice too.

    Did any have 4 speed auto?

    Quite willing to get a manual.

    Are parts available?

    Any information would be greatly appreciated.

    Regards

    alan

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    Fellow Frogger! callipygous's Avatar
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    My pick of the 505’s are the old iron block SLi (injection) vehicles. Much more reliable than the Gti/STi alloy PRV engined cars as they are a much simpler design with no cam belt or oil seals. A lot smoother, too. If you can tolerate a 3 speed auto, that is, as I’m fairly certain that all SLi’s were auto. Unfortunately the SLi’s are getting thin on the ground, but I still see GTi’s and STi’s frequently. Some people swear by them and the alloy PRV motors but I personally don’t like them. Except the V6 which never made it to Australia.
    The only 505’s to come with a 4 speed auto were the very last of the estate (wagons) with the alloy PRV motors.

    Only the GTi/SLi’s came with mags and boot spoilers but these can easily be fitted to another model. Just be wary of TRX (metric) rims that usually came on the STi as you won’t be able to get tryes for them. GTi’s had the 15” alloys you would be after. The SRDT diesel had 15” alloys also, but of a different design aesthetically, which you either do or don’t like the look of. GTi wagons had 14” mags.

    I didn’t mention the older GR/SR variants as you did sound as if you were looking for a “later” model 505.
    Peugeot 504 Intercooled T04 Turbo, Four Mikuni R1 carburettors, external waste gate, Microsquirt ignition, 5 speed.

  3. #3
    1000+ Posts Peter Chisholm's Avatar
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    I'm pretty sure that series 2 505 GTis came with a four speed auto.

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    1000+ Posts robmac's Avatar
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    In my opinion the 505 SR/ GR with the XN engines are a smoother car to drive.

    I've never been a fan of OHC douvrin engines.
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  5. #5
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    Thank you guys for your replies and the information.

    I'm not a fan of timing belts for classic cars. I'd rather have pushrods or chain drive.

    Seeing as I'd prefer a manual car the GR/SR sound like the better cars for me.

    Are there good ones still around?

    How about the SRDT, are these the Turbo Diesels of the early 80s? I'd love one of these but how rare are they??

    Regards

    Alan

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    I had an early 505 ,the first model with no power steering and had problems with things you wouldn't think about on a 504 ,like fuse box issues and the seats seamed too soft for me .I havnt driven any later model so I don't know if things improved later

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    1000+ Posts robmac's Avatar
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    I saw a late model GTI (with a broken cam belt) retro fitted with SLI , injected XN engine and 5 Speed gearbox.The donor SLI was rusted beyond repair.

    This was delightful vehicle because it all creature comforts of the GTI along with a smooth and easy to work on engine. In a spacious engine bay.
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    Fellow Frogger! TassieExec's Avatar
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    Hi Alan
    While I agree that the XN engines are a bit smoother, I would still prefer the injection motors, my experience with both has been that the injection motors last far longer, the timing belts are not an issue if you replace them at the right mileage. The STi's had the K-jet mechanical fuel injection which is quite reliable and works well, the GTi's had the L-Jet computer controlled injection which also seems good, has the advantage of a bit more power and easily converted to a more modern engine control system. I think from late 85 or early 86 all GTi's had the 4 speed auto. For me the pick of 505's is the Executive model, better trim and features and are an outstanding touring car. When we lived in QLD some time ago we regularly traveled 1100 K/lm from the country to Brisbane in one day without arriving stiff and sore. My STi Executive has now done 534000 K/Lm , I did a rebuild at 515000K/lm and fitted standard rings and bearing, rebuild primarily don to fix an oil leak in the head and I decide to do a complete rebuild because mileage was getting up a bit.
    Regards
    Neil

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    The K Jetronic injection in the SLi is not great. You could get manual SLi sedans, wagons were auto. 4 speed autos came in the last of the wagons and sedans.

    Quote Originally Posted by 120L View Post
    Thank you guys for your replies and the information.

    I'm not a fan of timing belts for classic cars. I'd rather have pushrods or chain drive.

    Seeing as I'd prefer a manual car the GR/SR sound like the better cars for me.

    Are there good ones still around?

    How about the SRDT, are these the Turbo Diesels of the early 80s? I'd love one of these but how rare are they??

    Regards

    Alan

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    Thamks again to all of you.

    Very interesting comments.

    The later model Gti certainly seems appealing but how about in years to come, even if I change the timing belt it may still break because its "new old stock" that's been stitting on a shelf for years?? If this is not a concern then that would be great but as I understand it regardless of kilometrage you still need to change the timing belt after fives years?

    Did the 1986 GTi have the new dashboard?

    When were the Gtis discontinued?

    What are the chances of picking up a really nice GTi now (manual or auto, prefer manual)?

    Regards

    Alan

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    1000+ Posts Beano's Avatar
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    I think the 1986 GTI had the new dashboard, but I'm not 100% certain. Some people don't like this dash as it's a bit plasticy and bits break.

    Your chances ? Just keep an eye out.....it's surprising what pops up from time to time.
    I suggest you go to Trovit website and request updates. They search many different ads from different places. The only problem is that even if you are specific about 505s, they still send you many other Peugeot ads.

    Try the classified ads in Peugeot clubs in different states. Canberra had a fair following.

    I second what Tassie Exec says about the executive models. People hang on to them though, as his mileage shows.

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    Hello,

    Having owner many 505's I would have to say in my opinion either the GTI Manual wagons or the Diesel cars would be the pick. The ZDJ OHC motor gives little trouble and when setup properly can go for many k's without problem.

    Parts like timing belts are not NOS they are new stock, EAI in Melbourne still keep some stuff on the shelf for 505 but it is getting less and less.

    My current GTI Wagon (which I am about to let go) while a bit rough in the body is flawless mechanically. I had to remove the head when I first purchased the car to fix the usual oil leak but otherwise it's been spot on. I agree that the XN motor is smoother but not in SLi configuration.

    As with Neil I have an Executive (ex Pugnut1) dry stored ready to be restored over the next couple of years, perhaps once I finish building my GTD wagon!

    Good luck, 505's are brilliant, but finding a good one these days that someone is prepared to sell is not so easy.

    Cheers
    Ben
    1988 Peugeot 505 GTI Wagon
    1990 Peugeot 505 GTD Turbo Wagon
    2000 Peugeot 306 XSI
    1973 Peugeot 504 GL





  13. #13
    1000+ Posts Peter Chisholm's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Beano View Post
    I think the 1986 GTI had the new dashboard, but I'm not 100% certain. Some people don't like this dash as it's a bit plasticy and bits break.

    Your chances ? Just keep an eye out.....it's surprising what pops up from time to time.
    I suggest you go to Trovit website and request updates. They search many different ads from different places. The only problem is that even if you are specific about 505s, they still send you many other Peugeot ads.

    Try the classified ads in Peugeot clubs in different states. Canberra had a fair following.

    I second what Tassie Exec says about the executive models. People hang on to them though, as his mileage shows.
    Yes, the 1986 GTi has the new dashboard as well as the three speed auto. I have an 1986 and a 1988. I do find the dash a bit plasticy.

    These are very old cars now so finding one in any condition may not be as easy as it was even a few years ago. If you find the right one you may still have to spend some money on bringing it up to scratch.

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    I bought a new 505 manual station wagon in 1990 and it was my first adventure into european cars. You couldn't buy auto's then until 1992 when they brought in the 505 "GTI" with a 4 speed automatic and without the alloy wheels to keep the price down, which had been quite high.
    The 505 that I had came in Topaz blue and was quite a good car, except for a manual transmission fault that it developed, which was "fixed" under warranty, but later caused me to lose 5th gear when out on the road and get stuck in the country. The car had good fuel consumption and looked quite "cool". I found it was important to lubricate the bearing that supported the gearbox, as I have had friends that have had their cars develop major faults with this not being done. Another quirky fault it had was in the kind of plastic the clutch master cylinder's top cap was made of, as it regularly used to break and split around the circumference!
    John505

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    Thanks again to all of you for your replies.

    What is the difference between an "Executive" and a GTi? Just trim or different motors?

    Also how about the Turbo Diesels are they extinct now?

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    The Executive had a sunroof , leather seats and I'm not sure but I think it had tighter suspension. I had the GTI series 1 executive in 3 speed auto and it definitely handled better and went harder than my series 2 manual GTI.
    As has been mentioned you could get the executive in STI and GTI. It was just a model with more appointments.

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    The Executives definitely handle better, particularly on bitumen, I think the Gr, SR & standard STi models are slightly better on dirt due to a softer suspension, it's almost impossible to get a manual executive as only very limited numbers were available in Australia.
    Regards
    Neil

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    1000+ Posts Pug_405_Mi16's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by luthier View Post
    The Executive had a sunroof , leather seats and I'm not sure but I think it had tighter suspension. I had the GTI series 1 executive in 3 speed auto and it definitely handled better and went harder than my series 2 manual GTI.
    As has been mentioned you could get the executive in STI and GTI. It was just a model with more appointments.
    STI and GTI Executive have the same suspension as a GTI series 1. The series 2 car have a redeveloped strut and I agree it doesn't seem to handle as well as a Series 1 GTI. I am pretty sure that the 1985 STI which has L jet rather than K Jet also has the same suspension as a GTI Series 1.

    I've got a manual GTI Executive, but it was converted by the previous owner. It really must be time to get it on the road!
    1988 Peugeot 505 GTI Wagon
    1990 Peugeot 505 GTD Turbo Wagon
    2000 Peugeot 306 XSI
    1973 Peugeot 504 GL





  19. #19
    1000+ Posts Pug_405_Mi16's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by 120L View Post
    Thanks again to all of you for your replies.

    What is the difference between an "Executive" and a GTi? Just trim or different motors?

    Also how about the Turbo Diesels are they extinct now?
    There are still a few diesel cars floating around, I just sold a super clean series 1 SRDT sedan with GTI interior and 15" GTI wheels. It was a cracker of a car and I only got $3,500 for it!
    1988 Peugeot 505 GTI Wagon
    1990 Peugeot 505 GTD Turbo Wagon
    2000 Peugeot 306 XSI
    1973 Peugeot 504 GL





  20. #20
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    Yes, later STis and S1 GTis have the best suspension, in my opinion the first time Peugeot produced a really good rear shock absorber and these were really really good, even now the only way you can match a thirty year old one is to fit a specialised rally unit.
    Early STis, the ones with the 180 size TRXs, were soft and S2 GTis were also soft although the offset front struts were good.
    The Executives were based on the European Turbo model, same suspension seats and body kit but with the K Jetronic Douvrin.

    By the way Ken Bailey has strut tops available for S1 505 and 504 also for 505 Series 2. 0400 566119

    Quote Originally Posted by Pug_405_Mi16 View Post
    STI and GTI Executive have the same suspension as a GTI series 1. The series 2 car have a redeveloped strut and I agree it doesn't seem to handle as well as a Series 1 GTI. I am pretty sure that the 1985 STI which has L jet rather than K Jet also has the same suspension as a GTI Series 1.

    I've got a manual GTI Executive, but it was converted by the previous owner. It really must be time to get it on the road!

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    All I can add is that if you find a good one buy it, fix what you need to and keep it! I have all but given up finding a good one that doesn't need a vast amount of work.

    I missed out on a very clean auto s2 gti about two years ago and recently have seen a manual that looked to be ok in Melbourne but that has disappeared off carsales.

    My only 505 was an 83 sti. Drove great but the engine with k-jet was not the most refined. Still I loved it, still miss it. Had to sell when I moved to the UK for a while. Wish I'd kept it!

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    Fellow Frogger! TassieExec's Avatar
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    Interesting comments re suspension differences between the Executives and STi's and GTi's, according to my handbook that came with my 84 STi Executive it has uprated suspension, This is certainly confirmed when driving it compared to my 85 STi , the Executive is far superior in handling to the STi, it sits flatter through corners and is a delight to drive quickly, other people who have driven both my cars report the same thing.
    Regards
    Neil

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    Many thanks to all of you and all the very best for Christmas and the New Year.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Pug_405_Mi16 View Post
    STI and GTI Executive have the same suspension as a GTI series 1. The series 2 car have a redeveloped strut and I agree it doesn't seem to handle as well as a Series 1 GTI. I am pretty sure that the 1985 STI which has L jet rather than K Jet also has the same suspension as a GTI Series 1.

    I've got a manual GTI Executive, but it was converted by the previous owner. It really must be time to get it on the road!
    I have owned a driven 505s over 100,000s of kms. I had 505GR that was good but soft with a lot of body roll. My STI I did 200,000 k plus and was very reliable, a bit soft in the suspension but cornered well (better than the 505GR). Best bar far was my 505GTI Series 2. The suspension in series 2 GTIs is excellent in my opinion - best rear wheel drive Pug ever (and by extension better than most other cars as well). I think the superiority of the series 2 is due to geometry of the front suspension (significant negative camber), superior weight distribution (front to rear) compared to the the iron block motor 505s and of course magnificent dampers. The alloy block Renault designed PRV 2.2 motors are also as tough as nails and not many have had to be rebuilt compared to iron block pushrod XN series engines.

    Best rear wheel drive Peugeot ever - Series 2 GTI (IMHO).

    Cheers

    JohnT

  25. #25
    1000+ Posts robmac's Avatar
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    Best rear wheel drive Peugeot ever - Series 2 GTI (IMHO).
    I'd say it's toss up between S2 505 GTI and a 604 with the carburation sorted out. Or on 100% gas.
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