505 maintenance - tips and tricks
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Thread: 505 maintenance - tips and tricks

  1. #1
    Member colj00's Avatar
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    Default 505 maintenance - tips and tricks

    Hi all, decided to start a thread dedicated to helping 505 owners keep their cars on the road, this thread will point out some of the little quirky design features and issues that 505's often have as they come of age. I had a 505 for over a year which I essentially rebuilt (she’s now moved on to a new owner as I got a new project car (ford falcon)) and I don’t want my knowledge to go to waste.
    PLEASE feel free to add any information on 505 maintenance or correct me if I have made any mistakes.
    enjoy

    Contents:
    1. RUST
    2. ELECTRICAL
    3. INTERIOR
    4. GEARBOX
    5. CLUTCH
    6. ENGINE
    7. STEERING

    RUST and corrosion

    Common places for rust:

    Door frames (just above the chrome strip) and area just above the door latch can rot from the inside out

    Antenna and region surrounding antenna

    Underneath battery, acid can leak and cause paint to strip from the inner wheel arch and in some cases, the box section frame can become compromised.

    Front quarter panels can trap mud and leaves over time and harbour moisture which will eat through the panels. Leaves will also become trapped under the plastic cover where the windshield wiper motor is found. It is a good idea to remove the cover and clean out any dirt and leaves trapped in there.

    ELECTRICAL

    Headlight globes can often blow frequently from a poor ground to the uninsulated grounding unit, the fix is to pull of the grounding hive which multiple components share and wire brush it clean and then replace all the spade crimps on the ground wires that connected to it, there is a grounding hive on either side of the car, located just underneath the headlights themselves in the engine bay, they are distinguished by their round shape and an excess or ground coloured (green and yellow) wires running to it.

    (Applicable to series 1 and 2 NON GTI dashes)
    Intermittently failing or completely dead dash cluster lights: the light globes in the dash cluster can vibrate loose over time causing them to lose their contact with the power source, to fix this, pull the dash cluster out (press in the 2 inconspicuous tabs on both sides of the inner cluster and pull the cluster outwards) and be very very VERY VERY VERYYYY careful not to tear the plastic film circuit board which lays on top of the cluster, do this by ensuring that your dash padding is not binding on the top of your cluster when you pull it out, if it is you MUST force your dash padding upwards to prevent tears to the circuit film, this may damage your dash padding but is absolutely necessary. You may find the dash cluster lights loose inside their socket, simply reinstall them twisting them in, hold down the circuit film with a generous piece of tape when reinstalling to prevent tearing the circuit film.

    INTERIOR
    Seats unable to slide backwards and forwards: the front seats may fail to slide back and forwards even with the slider bar raised fully, if this is the case, remove the seats and clean the rails with soap and water. Ensure there is no dirt, foam or dust stuck in the rails and then lubricate them with some WD40.

    Doors not opening: the rods which connects the door handle to the door latch have plastic inserts/clips on either end which lock into holes on said door handles and latch. The plastic inserts/clips will deteriorate with age and can break very easily causing the rod to fall off. Ideally, replace the plastic inserts/clips but if you are unable to find any, a zip tie can hold in the rod.

    Wind up windows not functioning: age causes the material + glue holding the windows slot thing to break off, meaning there’s nothing for the rollers to grab onto to push or pull the window down/up (sorry if that makes no sense, im very tired).

    GEARBOX

    Loose, floppy and vague manual transmission gear shifter: the gear shifter can become very floppy and vague over time due to the bushings wearing out. The gearstick is an external design and is mounted to the car at 2 points, on a rubber bushing on the top of the gearbox on the front and a rubber block piece affixed to the car at the back. The gear shifter is linked to the gearbox via external rods (unlike a traditional rear wheel drive setup where the gear shifter protrudes from the gearbox itself), when the gearstick is moved to the left or right, it pivots on the rubber bushing on the gearbox and pivots IN the rubber block on the rear of the component, the bushing on the gearbox (at the front) can wear out leaving a canyon like gap and the rubber piece which supports the rear of the gear shifter can break off from the body of the car providing a lot of slop in the gear stick. To fix this, find a new bushing or make your own from Sikaflex for the front bushing and simply glue or fasten the rubber block piece back on the car for the rear support. The improvement is drastic.

    CLUTCH

    The hydraulics which actuate the clutch disengagement in the 505 (and 504’s apparently) are particularly unique, and quite frankly, a piece of crap. The clutch hydraulics cannot be bled in the regular way of depressing the pedal and having someone crack the bleeder valve on the slave cylinder.
    To completely bleed a 505 clutch, you must remove the slave cylinder from the flexible hydraulic hose, ensure the master is full of fluid and let it gravity bleed for a few minutes – top up the reservoir before this next step, remove the dust cover from the slave and force the piston as far into the slave body as you can (it takes a LOT of strength), maintain pressure on the slaves piston as you refit it to the flexible hydraulic hose. Ensure the master still has fluid in the reservoir and top up if necessary.

    Clutch engages very close to the floor: the clutch on the 505 does not have any adjustment to correct this, if you find the pedal travel distance before engagement undesirable, then you will need to remove the master cylinder and lengthen the rod which attaches to the clutch pedal.

    ENGINE

    XN Series (1971 cc with solex carburettor)
    The EGR pipes which stick out just before the exhaust manifold clog up on high millage cars. As they clog they can trap moisture and cause heavy corrosion leaving the EGR unserviceable. The pipes can be cut off and then the EGR ports can be blocked by a large bolt or by welding, it’s simply not worth fixing.

    STEERING
    The steering rack has a plastic bushing/coupling/flector where it bolts to the steering wheel shaft, the bushing can crack over time and it’s the only thing joining the steering wheels to the steering rack. From factory, these bushing are riveted on but if you are lucky enough to find a NOS part, you will receive bolts to attach the new part on to the rack. It’s important that you replace this part if it’s cracked because total steering loss could potentially ensue.

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    Last edited by colj00; 6th September 2016 at 03:13 PM.
    Current fleet:

    Toyota Yaris 2007
    Ford Falcon EL wagon 1996
    Nissan NX 1993

    Previous:

    Peugeot 505 SR 1985
    Nissan pulsar 1998
    Nissan pulsar 2000
    Toyota Corolla 1990

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    Quote Originally Posted by colj00 View Post
    STEERING
    The steering rack has a plastic bushing where it bolts to the steering wheel shaft, the bushing can crack over time and it’s the only thing joining the steering wheels to the steering rack. From factory, these bushing are riveted on but if you are lucky enough to find a NOS part, you will receive bolts to attach the new part on to the rack. It’s important that you replace this part if it’s cracked because total steering loss could potentially ensue.
    what plastic bushing?

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    Steering Coupling?
    Wildebeest likes this.

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    Yes, rubber.

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    RUST. Common area is the left hand rear passenger door at
    The quarter vent on Series one cars. I think it's due in to poor rubber window moulding which must hold water. I guess the solution would be to cut a groove to allow the water to get away
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    1000+ Posts Wildebeest's Avatar
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    The rubber coupling [flector] has, or did at one time have a 'fail safe' arrangement preventing a total loss of steering.
    It would be a poor owner/steerer who couldn't feel something not being right!

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    Great idea to start a thread like this, and will be happy to contribute, to begin with:-

    Rust while these cars will rust, in general if you maintain them well, they are very good in this area.

    Clutch bleeding, the simplest way is to connect a rubber hose between a front wheel caliper bleed screw and the clutch slave bleed screw and simply pump fluid up from the brakes into the clutch reservoir, then top up brake reservoir, job done.
    Regards
    Neil

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    1000+ Posts parry's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by TassieExec View Post
    Great idea to start a thread like this, and will be happy to contribute, to begin with:-

    Rust while these cars will rust, in general if you maintain them well, they are very good in this area.

    Clutch bleeding, the simplest way is to connect a rubber hose between a front wheel caliper bleed screw and the clutch slave bleed screw and simply pump fluid up from the brakes into the clutch reservoir, then top up brake reservoir, job done.
    Regards
    Neil
    Really, this works?
    90 205 Gti Cherry Red(Track Car)
    2009 207gti
    1985 505gti (Shitbox Rally) Sold

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    1000+ Posts Peter Chisholm's Avatar
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    A anti pollution pipe layout diagram for a Nov '82 XN1 would be really useful right about now.

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    Member colj00's Avatar
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    yes the steering coupling/flector thing is what im talking about.
    Current fleet:

    Toyota Yaris 2007
    Ford Falcon EL wagon 1996
    Nissan NX 1993

    Previous:

    Peugeot 505 SR 1985
    Nissan pulsar 1998
    Nissan pulsar 2000
    Toyota Corolla 1990

  11. #11
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    regarding the steering flector- I didn't find anywhere the part for power steering which comes with a metal collar riveted to it, and mine was dry and cracked.
    what i did is to drill out the rivets, remove the collar and install it on a new flector from a manual steering (which is plentyful) with regular bolts and nuts.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Peter Chisholm View Post
    A anti pollution pipe layout diagram for a Nov '82 XN1 would be really useful right about now.
    found something regarding canadian models, see from page 13.
    is that what you have in australia?
    http://club-peugeot-505.fr/documents...ion.export.pdf

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    Most of us throw stuff away then years later realize we could have helped others. I located some Peugeot /Renault simplified wiring diagrams recently 1975 to 1984 approx cars sold in USA,LHD naturally but all could help.somehow. The book is about 8 inches thick ,must had cost plenty!
    In your case Piping and pollution hose Manuals [if that's what you mean} were sold in Aust,only ones around now would be by committed hoarders or NRMA or RACQ whose workshop was around the corner from me in Spring Hill, I used to go down there and bludge a dekko in their manuals library, may still have them --somewhere,altho' not much nostalgia in business any more I'm afraid !
    But if you know what these hoses were doing [or trying to] you can sus them out.

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    1000+ Posts Peter Chisholm's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by 2pac View Post
    found something regarding canadian models, see from page 13.
    is that what you have in australia?
    http://club-peugeot-505.fr/documents...ion.export.pdf
    Thanks. That seems right.

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    If the battery light on the dash blows the alternator won't get excited so will refuse to charge.
    Told to me by a very nice helpful bloke from Queensland who ran a few tune up shops in his day.
    Saved my bacon at the time.

    If it refuses to start and doesn't spark or pump fuel check the coil first. Then the ignition module. Always carry a spare ignition module and some dialectic grease. When that fails the ecu stops the fuel pump as a safety feature.

    If it backfires and then stalls and won't start make sure all the air hoses are still on properly.

    Lately I've had a starting problem that I still don't understand.
    After swapping a lot of things over, shooting in the dark, I found a blown fuse and then it started. No idea why yet. Any clues?

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    mine started to miss fire when it rained turned out it was the carbon plug leads and distributor cap they are a pain to replace

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    1000+ Posts Beano's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by TassieExec View Post
    Great idea to start a thread like this, and will be happy to contribute, to begin with:-

    Rust while these cars will rust, in general if you maintain them well, they are very good in this area.

    Clutch bleeding, the simplest way is to connect a rubber hose between a front wheel caliper bleed screw and the clutch slave bleed screw and simply pump fluid up from the brakes into the clutch reservoir, then top up brake reservoir, job done.
    Regards
    Neil
    Quote Originally Posted by parry View Post
    Really, this works?
    Apparently this works well, but I myself have not done it. I imagine you would probably have to tie a bit of wire around each end of the rubber (or plastic) tube where they join the bleeder nipples so that they do not pop off from the pressure when you put your foot on the brake.

    Another way to bleed the clutch is to arrange the metal pipe and flexible hose which connect master cylinder and slave cylinder, so that there are no "roller coaster" hills and valleys in it all. That way, when you tap all the way up and down the tube and hose, air bubbles make their way to the top. Then you leave it a little while and pump the clutch pedal a few times. Presto ! It's bled.

    A Peugeot specialist once told me that he had received numerous calls from local garages which had tried to bleed 504 / 505 clutch hydraulics and were ripping their hair out because they could not get the system bled. They were doing it all like you would bleed a Toyota or Holden.

    Here's a general tip : When brake or clutch flexible hoses get old, they collapse inside (without leaking to the outside) and the inner part starts to operate like a valve, letting fluid one way (out) but not allowing it back.

    Also, when 505s with trapezoidal headlights get old, the headlight glass often falls out. The mastic (or whatever it is) gets brittle from age and no longer sticks the glass in.

  18. #18
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    Running a rubber hose between the bleed nipple works really well, I've always done it with someone helping so one person holds the hose on while the other pumps, but beano's idea would work fine, or use a thin cable tie, since I did it last time I've built my own pressure bleeder so that would work too if attached to the clutch bleeder.
    Regards
    Neil

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    I have repaired numerous 504 and 505 tra headlights over the years. clean the glass carefully and trim excess old sealer from the backing ' Then use window and glass silicone to bond them back together. Leave overnight to cure.

  20. #20
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    Maybe use CRC silicon spray 'dry lube' on the seat rails rather than wet/oily WD40.

    On an old 604 I got a lot more life from the leaking power steering seals by adding a cap full of brake fluid which softens/swells the old hardened seals.
    Tip from a southern LA wrecker.

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