Plug Type help Please
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  1. #1
    Member flurry's Avatar
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    Icon5 Plug Type help Please

    Hi Guys

    I recently serviced my GTi 180 and was sold Valeo plug type RE13HC9 which caused the car to cough up all sorts of errors including the infamous Anti Pollutant Failure and also a Catalytic Converter Failure and also drove like it had two cylinders :-(

    After checking the plugs I removed they had code RF80LZDC on them and after putting them back in the car runs like a dream again.

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    Does anyone know which part is the correct one? (for some reason I cant login to Peugeot Box tonight)

    Cheers

  2. #2
    sans witticism SLC206's Avatar
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    The original plugs are PSA part number 5960.90 or 5960.G3, which were often boxed Bosch FQR7ME plugs.
    Regards,

    Simon

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  3. #3
    1000+ Posts Fordman's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by flurry View Post
    Hi Guys

    I recently serviced my GTi 180 and was sold Valeo plug type RE13HC9 which caused the car to cough up all sorts of errors including the infamous Anti Pollutant Failure and also a Catalytic Converter Failure and also drove like it had two cylinders :-(

    After checking the plugs I removed they had code RF80LZDC on them and after putting them back in the car runs like a dream again.

    Does anyone know which part is the correct one? (for some reason I cant login to Peugeot Box tonight)

    Cheers
    I think that is a very unusual situation. If you are a reasonably competent DIY mechanic or better, then please excuse the "teaching grandma to suck eggs" note of my reply!

    Are you sure the plug tips were not bent, with nil or very little gap, or the porcelain cracked, or something else badly wrong with those new plugs? Maybe they are just faulty, best checked by testing them in another engine, or by a workshop with a plug tester.

    The reason I say that is usually if a plug fits physically, the engine will run OK. If its the wrong heat range it will either overheat or cause oil/carbon build up on the plug, but this will take some time to occur. To actually cause ECU fault codes, I believe there is something seriously wrong with those plugs, not necessarily the specification of them, unless they are radically different.

    There is an old saying in motorsport - a set of used plugs which are known to work, is better than a new set which has not been tested in an engine.

    Cheers.

    Edit: Didn't by any chance get the wires crossed at the first plug change?
    Last edited by Fordman; 4th December 2015 at 01:35 PM.
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  4. #4
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    Along the same line ,im not familiar with this engine but would suspect that the connection on the coil pack or pacts has been disturbed when doing the initial change over and has rectified itself the second time around check all relevant connections ,pugs or you could just have a couple of dud new plugs ,

  5. #5
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    I had similar issues when my wiring in the plug to the coil pack was faulty, fixed the wiring, no more issues.
    It does sound to me like it might be the coil pack not properly seated, or plugged in etc.

    I've also got the code for NGK plugs - LFR6B. I'm using them currently with no issues.
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  6. #6
    1000+ Posts driven's Avatar
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    How to read a plug

    Attachment 77782

  7. #7
    Member flurry's Avatar
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    Thanks for the advice guys I'm bit confused however as I have a totally different plug part number in the car to the one supplied to me, they physically look different and the new ones cause running issues, the old ones work fine, isn't this just a case of I was supplied the wrong plug type?

    Cheers

    EDIT:- I also checked the FQR7ME part on eBay and the search box says no good for RC? But another part num is?

    Plug Type help Please-screen-shot-2015-12-15-13.46.42.jpg

    Plug Type help Please-screen-shot-2015-12-15-13.50.46.jpg
    Last edited by flurry; 15th December 2015 at 02:51 PM. Reason: Add Info

  8. #8
    sans witticism SLC206's Avatar
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    I guess I'd suggest you go to a "real" catalogue, like:

    www.bosch.com.au

    www.ngk.com.au

    Incidentally, the Valeo page has this to say:

    Plug Type help Please-gti180-plugs.jpg

    So you weren't sold the wrong plugs, it would seem.

    I don't suppose you gapped them? All three catalogues say 0.9mm.
    Last edited by SLC206; 16th December 2015 at 08:14 PM.
    Regards,

    Simon

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  9. #9
    Member flurry's Avatar
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    Thanks SLC206, I thought they were preset :-( School boy error

    Cheers everyone for your help.

  10. #10
    sans witticism SLC206's Avatar
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    Aha.

    I once had an Ultratune guy with a lot of experience tell me that plugs were "preset from the factory" and didn't need gapping.

    I was a bit mystified as I was always taught to set them myself, so I always assumed that everyone else did too.
    Regards,

    Simon

    2018 308 GTi 2011 DS3 DSport
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    2014 208 GTi 2007 207 GTi 2004 206 GTi180 2000 206 GTi 1995 306 XT

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  11. #11
    1000+ Posts Fordman's Avatar
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    They are usually gapped correctly, but visual check required to make sure one hasn't been dropped on its end or something, and closed up the gap. But yes, I usually check the gaps with a gauge as well.

    So, Mr Flurry, was one of the plugs actually closed up, causing your problem?

    Because, again, they have to be a fair way out to cause a bad problem.
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  12. #12
    Member flurry's Avatar
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    Seems mine weren't gapped correctly at all. Changed the gap to be 0.9 as advised and fitted the new plugs, running better but still occasionally missing, she's had a new coil pack recently. Is it possible the connector to the pack can fail?

    Thanks guys :-)

  13. #13
    1000+ Posts Fordman's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by flurry View Post
    Seems mine weren't gapped correctly at all. Changed the gap to be 0.9 as advised and fitted the new plugs, running better but still occasionally missing, she's had a new coil pack recently. Is it possible the connector to the pack can fail?

    Thanks guys :-)
    From your first post, it looks like you can read any fault codes from the ECU. I suggest you now clear any codes if they still remain, then drive vehicle and wait for another fault code to point you in the right direction. An ignition coil fault code could also mean a poor connection to that coil, but you will know which one.

    That is just a general comment - I do not know the details of your model car at all, but most are similar.

    It is my general experience that a coil will at first only miss when the engine is hot, say under load on a hot day, then they get worse and then they are easier to diagnose.
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  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by flurry View Post
    she's had a new coil pack recently. Is it possible the connector to the pack can fail?

    Thanks guys :-)
    Certainly possible, especially if connecting a new coil pack repeatedly to test. Mine did exactly that - although I actually broke one of the wires to the coil sort of on purpose.
    1984 505 Executive Auto

    206 GTi 180 - '804 Cat Cams, Jenvey DBW 48mm ITB's, AT Power Dry Sump, Emtron KV8 ECU, HP Electronik PDM, AIM MXS Dash, Custom Wiring Harness. AST Camber Tops & Coilovers, -2deg camber hubs by Frogstomp Racing, 24mm Torsion Bars, AP Racing brakes, Custom Radiator and Oil cooler, 3J Plate LSD, E85.

    Sandown - 1:31.5, Winton - 1:40.2, Wakefield - 1:11.05, Phillip Island - 1:55.9, The Bend (International) 2:23.2
    Nürburgring - 10:23.ish (Fiesta ST)

  15. #15
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    Plugs are the most common cause of coil pack failure
    High resistance = coil pack working harder.
    the larger the plug gap the higher the resistance for the high tension spark.
    Standard type plugs have more resistance and make the coil pack work harder than platinum or iridium.
    Hotter temps mean a leaner mixture giving a less damp environment for the spark to jump = higher resistance.
    Having had recent issues with both Champion and Bosch plugs I favor NGK iridium whenever these are available and have even run 1 heat range hotter without issue (not recommended without proper research)

    The fault codes will be generated by the misfire letting un-burned fuel into the exhaust if let go the cat will be stuffed in a very short time frame.

    Also ensure there are no EGR codes a faulty EGR valve will cause plugs to foul much more rapidly.

  16. #16
    Member flurry's Avatar
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    Speaksgeek did you manage to source a replacement connector?

    Strange the old plugs I took out were set to 0.9 already, I don't remember setting them.

    Anyway have yet to test car for a long period since new plugs gapped and fitted but I have noticed the missing can happen at completely random times, cold engine first start and hot engine after multiple stop starts, also it can feel like a single cylinder miss, low power until 3k rpm after that all 4 back firing and power restored, it's really strange.

    I'll get the fault codes and post them tomorrow. Thanks again guys :-)

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