Flushing a 205 gti radiator, what to do?
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  1. #1
    Fellow Frogger! Cubits's Avatar
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    Default Flushing a 205 gti radiator, what to do?

    Ok, found out my thermostat did indeed open with temperature, so that isn't the cause of my overheating issue. Next up is flushing the radiator.

    Now, my radiator doesn't appear to be the factory fitted one, but the pipes are in the right places. Only thing i can't find is the bottom plug for the radiator. There is one, right? If not, what do i remove to flush it? Once the bottom is disconnected i open the "do not open" plug on the top right (looking into bonnet) to give it a good mechanical flush (hose)?

    That, followed by a shot of alkaline salts in the coolant for a while should see it work (without running the car, of course). Then i can flush it again, and refill with decent coolant, and hopefully have a cool(er) running car.

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    Oh, what do the bleed points look like on the lines? I haven't had a good look for them, but am i to understand there are a load of them? I think after removing the thermostat i will have to bleed the area immediately behind it, amongst others.

  2. #2
    Too many posts! JohnW's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cubits
    Ok, found out my thermostat did indeed open with temperature, so that isn't the cause of my overheating issue. Next up is flushing the radiator.

    Now, my radiator doesn't appear to be the factory fitted one, but the pipes are in the right places. Only thing i can't find is the bottom plug for the radiator. There is one, right? If not, what do i remove to flush it? Once the bottom is disconnected i open the "do not open" plug on the top right (looking into bonnet) to give it a good mechanical flush (hose)?

    That, followed by a shot of alkaline salts in the coolant for a while should see it work (without running the car, of course). Then i can flush it again, and refill with decent coolant, and hopefully have a cool(er) running car.

    Oh, what do the bleed points look like on the lines? I haven't had a good look for them, but am i to understand there are a load of them? I think after removing the thermostat i will have to bleed the area immediately behind it, amongst others.

    Would you consider buying a manual?

    JohnW

  3. #3
    Fellow Frogger! Cubits's Avatar
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    I have ordered a manual (i ordered it the day i got the car), but it wont be here for a week... and i never actually had a good go in my car (its so unfair, its just sitting out there!).


  4. #4
    Fellow Frogger! Cubits's Avatar
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    Ahah. Thanks to the wonders of the internet, i have a preview copy of the haynes manual while my proper copy is en route via the moon, it seems.

    I took to the hoses with the screwdriver (screw type clips) and flushed the radiator and block clean. There seemed to be a little sediment in the waste, and while hosing i clearly saw the water starting to flow through all of the "vanes" across the radiator, which is good news. I put some mukowt (alkaline salt solution) into the radiator when i was refilling the system with water just to give any remaining buildups the heave-ho, and tomorrow i should be able to drive her again (wheeee!).

    Then it's back on track to receive the ICE and new wheels.

    I've worked on a french car before, and ive worked on a small car with a big engine... but a small french car with a big engine takes the cake for impossible gaps you have to get tools into!

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cubits
    I've worked on a french car before, and ive worked on a small car with a big engine... but a small french car with a big engine takes the cake for impossible gaps you have to get tools into!
    Maybe you'd better not ever put a Mi16 motor in there then. It is workable but harder than the standard motor to work on. Very tight fit.

    e.g. I worked out that the best approach for alternator change is to remove the bottom engine mount bolt, in order to tilt backwards the Mi16 engine (in 205), in order to get the alternator out the top with a half-twist-and-double-somersault and score a 10 from the judges.
    Last edited by 205 GTI16; 23rd March 2004 at 01:08 PM.

  6. #6
    Fellow Frogger! Cubits's Avatar
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    Lol. Unfortunately that day will probably come around some time in the distant future.. so i better get used to the roominess of the engine bay i have now and be thankful (yeah, oh great lord of the frog).

    Anyway, now it seems that flushing was a pointless exercise (although educational), as i found the cause of my overheating. The thermoswitch is closed, and the only way i can get the fans to run is by turning on the non-functional aircon (which works to cool the engine, albeit with a large cost in fuel efficiency).

    At least my fans aren't broken.

    Now to order a new thermoswitch.. whee (are these common car parts, or a peugeot special?).

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cubits
    Now to order a new thermoswitch.. whee (are these common car parts, or a peugeot special?).
    Didn't I tell you in your other post to check the thermoswitch to start with?

    Peugeot special I believe.

    I just replaced my late-205 thermoswitch with one from a "non air-con 205" (or so the part number sticker was labelled) which of course would've been a special part for people who power-steer optioned their Australian 205 GTI around the "Will it be power steering OR air conditioning sir? (not both)" era.

    Means my 16V 205 runs ONLY between 87 and 92.5 degrees C according to dash. Perfect! With late-205 switch it ran between 90 to 112 C!!!

    Weather has nothing to do with motor running hot or cold. Peugeots tend to run hot regardless. Never saw my late-205 (when it was 8v) run cooler than 100 C. Of course, the coolant is 50% ethylene glycol so it's protected from boiling to 118 C anyway.

    I got the idea from

    http://www.205gti.com/techcoolingUK.htm

  8. #8
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    If you bridge the thermoswitch with a wire it should run the fans without resorting to putting the air on.

    Maybe a reno switch will work - or another euro. You could go to a workshop that deals with both frog and kraut cars - I'm sure they will have a switch to suit.

    In fact some benz thermostats suit frog cars - and you can get a range of temp openings. I noticed that reno 20 and the 604 in aussie spec were fitted with cold climate thermos. The hot climate spec ones open much earlier. So maybe that is something worthwhile checking out too.

    Cheers ... Nick

  9. #9
    Fellow Frogger! Cubits's Avatar
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    I got a new thermoswitch from that french car care place in east brissie, but when i got home (i drove the pug with aircon running, its quite alright temp wise), the fans were running independant of the aircon (and at higher speed for about a minute)!!

    So now i'm thinking either the thermoswitch is faulty, but partially working, or my weird earthing leaks are causing hell on that front too (or both!).

    Anyway, im replacing the thermoswitch with the new one i got, just to make sure (its also a cooler opening version ), and i'm going to pull the battery out so i can check all the wiring bundled in that corner. I already found and fixed a loose earth wire, but there must be more worn connecters or something down there.

    But its nice now, i can whoop my friends mk2 golf gti

  10. #10
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    hi - my aussie Fairlane has two fans which work at different speeds. Relay switch/s are involved in controlling their operation - relays may also be used in your pug and are worthwhile checking. If you can access a savvy Auto Sparky you could save a lot of time/worry.

    Cheers ... nick

  11. #11
    Fellow Frogger! Cubits's Avatar
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    Aaah, i found the problem when i took my thermoswitch out... the connector that plugs into the switch was a little worn, and one of the plugs (the positive wire) wasn't seated correctly, so it wasn't making contact.

    But replacing the thermoswitch with a lower temp one was probably worth it anyway... and of course, theres that educational experience you only get from making the mistakes first.

    Now i just have to check out all the electrics stuffed down next to the battery and i should have full strength fans/headlights, and maybe a completely working fuel gauge.

    Oh, i noticed a weird thing. When my car has been sitting a while and i get in, theres a smell of petrol! I checked the fuel pump but there was just dust on it, and no trace of any leak. The same goes for under the car.

    It's odd...

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cubits
    Aaah, i found the problem when i took my thermoswitch out... the connector that plugs into the switch was a little worn, and one of the plugs (the positive wire) wasn't seated correctly, so it wasn't making contact.
    This is often the solution to many electrical problems... Bad connections...

    But replacing the thermoswitch with a lower temp one was probably worth it anyway... and of course, theres that educational experience you only get from making the mistakes first.
    Mistake? Replacing the thermoswitch with a lower temp one is one of the best ways to spend $40 on your cooling system! It'll keep your engine running cooler which will prolong its 'life. Plus when that Mi16 engine lands in there, you're cooling system will already be up to the job!

    P.S. In cars of this age, it's usually the copper wires contained within the engine bay themselves which are the culprits to many electrical problems. The PVC insulation can look fine on the outside, yet the copper wires can be broken on the inside. This occurs usually because in time, the wires go through many hot/cold (expansion/contraction) cycles, become stretched - looms move, vibrate and often looms have been repaired before (re-terminated wires) etc. Generally mating cycles of plugs/sockets etc during servicing also results in wear and tear of contacts and wires...

    Ah, my 100th post...

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