504 Belt 'n Braces.
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Thread: 504 Belt 'n Braces.

  1. #1
    1000+ Posts Wildebeest's Avatar
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    Default 504 Belt 'n Braces.

    You'd never read about it, well you would right here.
    One of the jobs on my 504's list was to unlock the fan clutch. With the old radiator removed I undid the three adjusting screws on the fan hub. The fan remained locked. A closer look revealed three spaced dobs of bronze permanently locking the fan discs! Nothing like having an each way bet I suppose.
    Digging around among my spares found another fan clutch but it had a dodgy bearing. So another job for later.

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    To make the radiator easier to remove I intend pissing off the trans oil cooler fittings and replacing them with high pressure hose etc.

    The Dayco thermostat specified for my 504 didn't fit because of a casting "baffle" in the housing. [Later type pump]. Oh for some odd reason the T/stat didn't come with a new O ring.
    Placed the old T/stat in a container of boiling water, it tested OK. [I]Bonus.[I]

    To follow up from my previous post. Even with the recon radiator the temp gauge still reads high although with a temp probe in the top tank it reads OK.
    As I've commented before, because the gauge reads high after a short run I'm inclined to dismiss the dreaded plug behind the water pump. My thinking is if the plug was the problem the temp reading would initially read cold then rising after a lengthy run.
    I've noted earlier contributors suggestions, still to be acted on.

    Jobs done over the last few days have been removing the EGR valve and plumbing. Two very neat 18mm plugs neatly sealing off the exhaust and inlet manifolds. The inlet pre-heat pipe being removed to access the manifold.
    Tappet adjustment next while everything had cooled down overnight. Clean up and repaint the 'rocket' cover.
    Removing the spark plugs created some angst*. All but one came out readily, the last eventually after three hours of working the plug after drowning it with auto trans. Thankfully the threads were OK. Lashings of Never Seize on the new plugs.

    In the short time I've owned my "New" '79 504 most of the surplus hardware has been removed. All the air/con gear being the first. All of the above being removed has made for a much tidier under bonnet appearance almost like a 404.

    * A little tip for early Peugeot owners. If the spark plugs have been installed for an indeterminate period, remove them while you can and apply some never seize or graphite to the threads. Don't over tighten when replacing.

  2. #2
    1000+ Posts Beano's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Wildebeest View Post

    To make the radiator easier to remove I intend pissing off the trans oil cooler fittings and replacing them with high pressure hose etc.
    Does "etc" mean an external cooler ? They do extend gearbox life quite a bit.

    Good advice on the plugs.

  3. #3
    1000+ Posts Peter Chisholm's Avatar
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    With 504s being so old now and having been owned by at least several people it not surprising that everone has done their bit to "improve" things. There is some good advice in this thread - who was it who said "expect the unexpected".

  4. #4
    1000+ Posts driven's Avatar
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    Anti seize compounds can have a torque multiplying effect when installing plugs.

    This can lead to thread distortion and thread galling resulting in cylinder head damage.

    Spark plugs are nickel plated to resist the effects of corrosion and seizing.

    Never remove plugs when the engine is hot.

    ChemSearch Yield will wick into any thread giving easy removal of frozen threads... but dear as poison

  5. #5
    1000+ Posts Beano's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by driven View Post
    Anti seize compounds can have a torque multiplying effect when installing plugs.

    This can lead to thread distortion and thread galling resulting in cylinder head damage.
    Point taken. But I think that Wildebeest has addressed that by advising to be careful to not overtighten.

  6. #6
    1000+ Posts Wildebeest's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by driven View Post
    Anti seize compounds can have a torque multiplying effect when installing plugs.

    This can lead to thread distortion and thread galling resulting in cylinder head damage.

    Spark plugs are nickel plated to resist the effects of corrosion and seizing.

    Never remove plugs when the engine is hot.

    ChemSearch Yield will wick into any thread giving easy removal of frozen threads... but dear as poison

    Oh gawd what have I wrought?

    When the Volvo 260 PRV6 were introduced we had quite a run of snapped spark plugs, occurring while being removed. These were OE Champion plugs with the tapered seat and smaller hex [5/8" ?]. The word came from Volvo Aus. to apply a smear of moly grease to the thread and seat of the plugs.
    If the supplied plug spanner was used correctly it would or should have been difficult to over tighten. A simple tube spanner with a T bar handle requiring no more torque than can be provided by one hand.

    Thanks Driven for your post.


    Beano,
    No, changing the fittings from the original fixed steel pipe was to make the oil cooler banjo bolts on the rad bottom tank easier to replace.
    The 504 had a trans cooler already fitted but not connected. It has joined my collection of Round Tuits.

  7. #7
    1000+ Posts BIGRR's Avatar
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    [QUOTE=Wildebeest;1288157]

    As I've commented before, because the gauge reads high after a short run I'm inclined to dismiss the dreaded plug behind the water pump. My thinking is if the plug was the problem the temp reading would initially read cold then rising after a lengthy run.
    I've noted earlier contributors suggestions, still to be acted on.


    Here goes my story: About 20 years ago, on my way to my aunt's funeral at Springvale Melbourne (Original pump on Ti) unbeknown to me on the way from Sydney the dreaded plug behind the water pump had escaped from its position and destroyed the water pump impellor, and guess what, yes the car got very, very hot.
    I had previously fitted a switch on the dash to turn on the fan so this helped cool the car to just "bloody hot" as compared to "far too bloody hot".
    After the funeral I chased down a (non genuine) new water pump.
    On the side of the road (in my good clothes) I removed the old pump and discovered the destroyed impellor and escaped plug. I had no way of refitting the plug so left it out and fitted the new pump, and prayed.
    Back on the road and headed for Sydney, without the fan running continuously the car still ran "too bloody hot" (into the red) even at light cruising speed. So I returned to Sydney running the fan the whole trip with the temperature running just on the hot line.

    Once I was back in Sydney I removed the new pump and screwed in a new plug (see below) the car returned to normal, until the new (non genuine pump bearings crapped themselves). I then removed the non genuine pump an threw it to the SH. I silver soldered the original pump impellor back together and refitted it and the car had given no running hot problems until the original pump case corroded apart (see below) about 3 years ago.

    "Can I lead a horse to water?"

    Good Luck
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails 504 Belt 'n Braces.-dsc01077.jpg   504 Belt 'n Braces.-dsc01083.jpg  
    Present fleet:-
    Peugeot 93' 205 Gti 16v
    Peugeot 73' 504 Ti from new
    Peugeot 08' 407 Hdi Coupe from new

    Previous fleet:-
    Peugeot 95' 605 Sv
    Peugeot 92' 205 Gti
    Renault 72' 16TS from new
    Renault 69' 10
    Renault 71' 10s
    Renault 68' 10 from new

    "Be reasonable do it my way!"


  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Wildebeest View Post
    A simple tube spanner with a T bar handle requiring no more torque than can be provided by one hand.
    That's what I use. Almost impossible to overtighten using one of those.
    BIGRR likes this.


    2003 PEUGEOT 206 GTi

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