timing belt change time
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  1. #1
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    Default timing belt change time

    407 3 litre v6, as we know the belt interval is 180,000km or 9 years, or whichever comes first. In my case the 9 years came first and haven't even got to half of the 180,000km. In the interests of not having to spend more than than what I need to, can I get away with just changing the belt and not change all the other gubbins? At the rate at which I use the car, I figure it will be another 9 years before it gets even close to 180,000km? Brains trust Please.

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  2. #2
    Fellow Frogger!
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    Change everything including water pump the largest part of the cost is labour
    I can highly recommend "The Garage" in Woodend
    The fellows name is Adrian
    He is the only human being I will trust to work on my cars
    If you do it yourself why not replace everything it costs so little extra

  3. #3
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    My 407, with the same motor as your, is in exactly the same situation.
    While reading your post I thought you were going to ask if you should risk not doing the belt at all. In this case I would have said to check the belt to see how it looks and it's tension. Often the belt won't snap, it just stretches enough to allow it to jump a tooth or two; the result is much the same.
    I wouldn't recommend this. You will always be worried.
    All that said, if you are changing the belt, I'd have thought most of the money is spent. It wouldn't be much of a stretch to do the rest while your at it. Would it?

  4. #4
    1000+ Posts Peter Chisholm's Avatar
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    I faced the same situation with my 406 D9 - four cylinder. On talking to those in the know, an old timing belt past it can look much the same as a good one. When I thought of the implication of a one stretching/breaking it made the decision to just spend the money a lot easier.

  5. #5
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    Woodend? It's 800 km away from the OP..........

  6. #6
    1000+ Posts driven's Avatar
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    Better change the belt before you come down :-)

  7. #7
    1000+ Posts Kim Luck's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by seasink View Post
    Woodend? It's 800 km away from the OP..........
    Melbourne's a big place.... (It's actually about 100km)
    Don't it always seem to go that you don't know what you've got 'til it's gone............

  8. #8
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    A belt can look pristine and still require changing. I have just done a belt change on my Mi16 which had an HSN belt on it last time, and the belt looked new after 8 years on the car but many less kilometres than the change interval. (The change interval on this engine is four years but this was a long life belt off a Lotus).

    Grenouille, I wouldn't recommend leaving the other components. While the bearings may make the kilometres, there's a pretty good chance the seals on the water pump or tensioners won't, and this could cause big issues earlier than the next change interval. Also, I've taken risks like that and it's always in the back of your mind...


    Quote Originally Posted by tonch504 View Post
    My 407, with the same motor as your, is in exactly the same situation.
    While reading your post I thought you were going to ask if you should risk not doing the belt at all. In this case I would have said to check the belt to see how it looks and it's tension. Often the belt won't snap, it just stretches enough to allow it to jump a tooth or two; the result is much the same.
    I wouldn't recommend this. You will always be worried.
    All that said, if you are changing the belt, I'd have thought most of the money is spent. It wouldn't be much of a stretch to do the rest while your at it. Would it?


    2003 PEUGEOT 206 GTi

  9. #9
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    Thanks for the replies, I wasn't even thinking of "If it looks ok, it must be ok", that belt is definately being changed. My thoughts were more along the line, that the car gets driven so little it will be another nine years before it gets anywhere near 180,000km. In my case the belt will always be "time" expired before it gets to be mileage expired. I estimate another two belt changes before the bearings will have done the 180,000km thing.

  10. #10
    1000+ Posts Kim Luck's Avatar
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    On the Scenic 2L engine, it is advised to change the timing belt more frequently if the car is operated in cold temperatures. How do you really know where your car has been? Are Pugs immune?
    Don't it always seem to go that you don't know what you've got 'til it's gone............

  11. #11
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    My understanding of timing belt development is that they used to primarily be made from chloroprene type compounds with a shortish life of say 60,000-80,000km, then the nitrile type extended the life to well over 100,000km; along with better reinforcing has allowed the super-extended life we now see.

    HOWEVER, the mechanical parts are much the same. As these already usually lasted two belts' time or distance, this would correspond with the now single extended service interval...that is, each belt change I presume the mechanical parts are replaced.

    So, I'd change them for peace of mind.


    2003 PEUGEOT 206 GTi

  12. #12
    1000+ Posts Peter Chisholm's Avatar
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    Peace of mind is important to me. You may not do many km but you have to remember that the blt is in an almost constant state of distortion (being wrapped around various things inside the timing cover). What does this do to the integity of the timing belt?

  13. #13
    Contented Peugeot Driver addo's Avatar
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    Not much, insofar as my layman's grasp of polymers imbues any knowledge. People overlook the Kevlar or similar woven layer in the middle as well. I believe temperature extremes affect the belt, cold reduces flexibility while heat drives out plasticisers. Contamination is a bad guy, ScotFrog had the actual term for it but basically many polymers are affected by oil or antifreeze or fuel - or any combination of these. Often an ageing belt will look scaly on the loaded side of the teeth.

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