Looking to buy a Peugeot 308 Tourer but being put off by all the negativity!
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Thread: Looking to buy a Peugeot 308 Tourer but being put off by all the negativity!

  1. #1
    Tadpole
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    Default Looking to buy a Peugeot 308 Tourer but being put off by all the negativity!

    Hello all,
    I would really like to get some opinions from Peugeot owners and drivers in Australia and New Zealand.
    Firstly I like Peugeots, I've owned 3 of them in the UK, 205, 306 and 307 - reluctantly selling the 307 to emigrate to Australia. Never had any problems with them and always got them serviced at dealerships which we all know is more expensive but gave peace of mind.

    Now in Oz, I need a larger car to fit my expanding young family into. I have a limited budget and have spent months looking around. I have looked at a few Peugeot 308 Tourers because they fit my budgetary, safety and size requirements with the 7 seat combo and my wife's "can't be too big, boxy or ugly" criteria and she would like to drive her annual 3,000 kms around our suburb on the school run in something familiar! Plus they seem like nice cars, giving you a lot of bang for your buck.

    However, everyone...and I mean everyone (apart from the people trying to sell them to me) have been negative about them. The local mechanic, my friend who is a mechanic, the woman organising my finance for god's sake! Even coming on these forums, all you read are bad things. Turbo leaks, timing chains snapping, poor service from Peugeot dealerships, going through brake pads too quickly etc.

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    I am now looking at what seems a pristine 308 tourer from 2010 with 90k kms on the clock full service history, 6 spd auto. In theory is should be a no-brainer but I can't get over the "fear factor". I realise that Peugeot sell millions of cars worldwide and they all can't be lemons but I would really like some honest advice and opinions on what it is like to own and service an out of warranty Pug 308 Tourer.

    Thanks

  2. #2
    Real cars have hydraulics DoubleChevron's Avatar
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    Are you crazy? Who would want to own one of them weird french cars ... it'll break and cost you a fortune you know

    Middle aged women with kids should be driving 3ton wank tanks. Didn't you know that? Go find a nice V8 Land Cruiser for her. shiny Prados seem to be the most loved by the school run mums. Everyone needs a 3ton truck to move a kid around in don't they Certainly you'll get positive comments from all the people that are telling you to keep away from them weird french cars

    seeya,
    Shane L.
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  3. #3
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    That was our resident elderly Citroen fanatic speaking. Elderly cars, not elderly fanatic.

    Seriously, 308s aren't a particular problem, no more than other new multiplexed computer driven cars (ie, all of them today). There is a fashion among Sydney mechanics to smile at Pugs and go apoplectic at Cits. It goes back many years. These same mechanics happily work on a Ford with a Pug diesel under the bonnet.

    The 6 speed auto box is a delight, and is Made in Japan by Aisin, and used by many manufacturers. Most of us here are wary of dealer$, and when out of warranty use independent mechanics who know these vehicles. Dealer part prices are astronomical in Australia, so we go to local firms who import and supply the OEM stuff at sensible prices. The specialist mechanics know these sources.

    Tell us more about the engine in the car you are looking at. I imagine it is the current 2.0 HDI - if it is, it is a reliable unit used also by Citroen, Ford and Volvo.

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    The biggest issue for you is who will look after the car. Some Peugeot dealer service people are hopeless, some great.
    Check the service and repair records of any car you intend to buy. This should give you a pattern of reliability.
    I'm not convinced about the reliability of modern auto transmissions but if auto is your preferred transmission format, you have no choice.
    I would consider getting a mechanic's inspection of your preferred car before you commit.
    If buying through a dealer, consider whether you want the standard warranty or extended warranty. Some firms offering extended warranty are very difficult to get money out of. Your local mechanic might be able to offer advice based on his experience. I think I'm right in saying Swan(n) was OK. I bought a 406SV some years back and never had a problem making claims.
    1998 Peugeot 406 D8SV Manual
    1999 Peugeot 406 D8ST Auto
    2002 Peugeot 406 D9SV Manual
    1994 Peuegot 306 N3 Cabriolet Manual
    1994 Peugeot 306 XR N3 Hatch
    1995 Peugeot 505 GTI executive
    1976 Peugeot 504 Sedan - Now sold

    Over 60 Pugs in my time
    Gerry Mullock

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    Re the criticisms you have heard: Timing chains are only a problem on early 1.6 EP6 petrol motors (used also by BMW) and the turbo oil leak refers to pipe connection on a 1.6 HDI model. All makes have known issues.

    European cars today ALL use softish brake pads on softish discs, which give great stopping power at the expense of long life. They are a non-warranty wear and tear item, and when they go, you should use an independent source (as above) to get the same, or else replace the items with Oz manufactured, which are usually harder and longer lived. Pug brake parts are easily obtained.

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    We have a 2007 307 and a 2011 308 Touring Wagon. Both 2 litre diesels and 6 speed manuals. The 307 has 180,000 km and the 308, 40,000. They are similar but different cars to drive. They both feel solid to drive, comfy and have amazing fuel economy as country highway cars, but cant say about the city driving. You said you had a good run in England with the 307, it should not be any different here. You can get plenty of advice where to take the car for a service through this forum. Sure there are lemons in all car brands and models, but Peugeot makes millions of cars. Has doubleshevron ever driven a 308 or does he just like stirring? He does have Citroeons dosn't he and who makes them???? Have a drive get it checked out and go by your gut feeling. And remember that being 2nd hand it wont be a new car. They have timing belts, not chains by the way and get changed at the latest at 180,000
    intervals. Happy to talk in private, send PM.

  7. #7
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    Hi All,

    Thanks for the responses. The engine is a 4 cylinder Petrol Turbo Intercooled 1.6 L (1598 cc) from a 2010 Pug 308 SW. Engine code is
    EP6CDT. It's a six speed automatic. I would prefer manual but auto is what is on offer.

    I rang Peugeot and they told me it was a timing chain so it didn't need changing!!
    It would be a private sale and I am looking into getting it NRMA inspected.
    Would anyone know of any peugeot-experienced independent mechanics around the Hurstville/Sutherland area?


    Any other advice?
    Cheers



  8. #8
    sans witticism SLC206's Avatar
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    Actually, the timing chain "snap" is an issue on the 1.6 HDi - along with a myriad of other issues if this engine is not looked after properly. It needs its oil changed religiously and using the correct spec, as you probably know.

    The 2.0 HDi seems like a much more robust (or forgiving?) engine.

    AFAIK, both 1.6 and 2.0 HDi motors are belt driven from one cam - and then a chain on that cam drives the other cam.

    Yes the 1.6 petrol turbo (THP) does seem to have a bad reputation (timing chain stretch, turbo oil pipe leaks, etc.), but I'm on number three now with none of those problems, touch wood.
    Regards,

    Simon

    2018 308 GTi 2011 DS3 DSport
    ----
    2014 208 GTi 2007 207 GTi 2004 206 GTi180 2000 206 GTi 1995 306 XT

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  9. #9
    sans witticism SLC206's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by RoverDownUnder View Post
    Would anyone know of any peugeot-experienced independent mechanics around the Hurstville/Sutherland area?
    Paul Vasallo at Carlton would be your man, I'd suggest.
    Regards,

    Simon

    2018 308 GTi 2011 DS3 DSport
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    2014 208 GTi 2007 207 GTi 2004 206 GTi180 2000 206 GTi 1995 306 XT

    www.peugeotclub.asn.au

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    The 1.6 turbo EP6CDT had chain stretch problems on early cars (yours isn't early) and a tendency to clog up the inlet valves with gunk from the crankcase breather. I understand this has been modified. The AM6 transmission is excellent.

    Paul Vasallo is the best Pug mechanic near you by a country mile. He trades as
    AP Automotive Engineering Services,
    87 Planthurst Rd Carlton
    though he is so busy there is often a waiting list. Give him a call.
    Last edited by seasink; 18th August 2014 at 12:30 PM. Reason: sp

  11. #11
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    Double Chevron was just being sarcastic not negative as he can be at times.
    The 308 seems to have a good reputation but I for one can't stand the appearance, particularly of the Touring, the latest ones seem to have been improved but still nothing like the 307 Touring which was a great looking car.
    Unfortunately the noisy ride has continued as per the 307.
    I've got to say though, that the shocker rates are perfectly matched to the springs. I guess rough roads are not now so commonplace in Europe. If the engineers were to drive on Melbourne's inner suburban streets we would see different suspensions being designed.
    Peugeots aren't the only cars to fail this test, my wifes Honda is also very harsh.
    Graham
    Quote Originally Posted by lockwood116 View Post
    We have a 2007 307 and a 2011 308 Touring Wagon. Both 2 litre diesels and 6 speed manuals. The 307 has 180,000 km and the 308, 40,000. They are similar but different cars to drive. They both feel solid to drive, comfy and have amazing fuel economy as country highway cars, but cant say about the city driving. You said you had a good run in England with the 307, it should not be any different here. You can get plenty of advice where to take the car for a service through this forum. Sure there are lemons in all car brands and models, but Peugeot makes millions of cars. Has doubleshevron ever driven a 308 or does he just like stirring? He does have Citroeons dosn't he and who makes them???? Have a drive get it checked out and go by your gut feeling. And remember that being 2nd hand it wont be a new car. They have timing belts, not chains by the way and get changed at the latest at 180,000
    intervals. Happy to talk in private, send PM.

  12. #12
    Real cars have hydraulics DoubleChevron's Avatar
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    I've never driven a 308 ... so have nothing to say. I've heard they ride even worse than a 307.... To be even worse than a 307 must mean it rides worse than a empty dumptruck...

    I don't get why manufactures are fitting stupid big wheels and ridiculously hard suspension to family cars. certainly they don't need to be so low you can't even drive them into a supermarket carpark without smashing the nose then tail into the ground

    seeya,
    Shane L.
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    Yay ... No Slugomatics


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  13. #13
    Contented Peugeot Driver addo's Avatar
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    It's quite an "old" car for an expat; that surprises me. At least there's no gritting here to dissolve the steel.

    If social opprobrium matters, buy another brand; as Shane suggests the Prado/Jeep type of lump would see your other half suitably poised for dealing with those toxic cliques. I've only (personally) seen one faulty 308 and it was a 2010 that had dropped its bundle with the common enough Pug fault of forgetting everything about itself.

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    Quote Originally Posted by addo View Post
    It's quite an "old" car for an expat; that surprises me. At least there's no gritting here to dissolve the steel.

    If social opprobrium matters, buy another brand; as Shane suggests the Prado/Jeep type of lump would see your other half suitably poised for dealing with those toxic cliques. I've only (personally) seen one faulty 308 and it was a 2010 that had dropped its bundle with the common enough Pug fault of forgetting everything about itself.

    Not sure how old or new a car an expat should drive. However for the amount of mileage we do...About 5000 km in the last 12 months or so because I am on the train to work and my wife isn't a fan of driving, I want cost effective driving, I don't want to be paying hundred of dollars a month for a car to sit on the drive. We drive a 20 year old Toyota Corolla that a friend gave us so there is no issue with "social opprobrium", in fact quite the opposite. We are trying to steer away from the SUV route despite the fact that everyone is saying "Buy Japanese or Korean" which are bloody boring cars but easy to maintain and more reliable apparently.

    Insurance is more expensive than a Japanese car and from what I can tell so are part. However there is a longer interval between services and the interior is nicer. With 3 actual seats as opposed to the 2.5 half, although not huge, it does help with the two child seats and an adult in the back, plus the additional 2 seats for when we have other kids with us, makes it seem like a good package. Like I said, if it wasn't for all the negativity, it would be a no-brainer.

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    Quote Originally Posted by seasink View Post
    The 1.6 turbo EP6CDT had chain stretch problems on early cars (yours isn't early) and a tendency to clog up the inlet valves with gunk from the crankcase breather. I understand this has been modified. The AM6 transmission is excellent.

    Paul Vasallo is the best Pug mechanic near you by a country mile. He trades as
    AP Automotive Engineering Services,
    87 Planthurst Rd Carlton
    though he is so busy there is often a waiting list. Give him a call.

    Thanks Seasink and SLC206. Just down the road so that works.

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    We Aussies are often amused at the English habit of (1) being shocked by the price of used cars here and (2) racing off and buying a new one! They last a lot longer when you don't salt the roads, and the used car buyer can avoid a lot of $$$ of depreciation. I usually hang on to a car until it is near its expiry date. Someone else can pay heavy depreciation

    The usual wear and servicing bits for Pugs are no dearer than Korean or Japanese, and can be a lot cheaper, provided you or your mechanic use the independent suppliers, eg EAI EAI: European Auto Imports. A noisy chain is obvious. Serving is quite conventional, EAI etc can supply and deliver the filters, although it uses long-life spark plugs when these are due. With all turbo cars oil changes are very important.

  17. #17
    1000+ Posts schlitzaugen's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by seasink View Post
    We Aussies are often amused at the English habit of (1) being shocked by the price of used cars here and (2) racing off and buying a new one!

    [...]
    Or

    3) buying a convertible.

    4) buying a black car
    ACHTUNG ALLES LOOKENPEEPERS

    Das computermachine is nicht fur gefingerpoken und mittengrabben. Ist easy schnappen der springenwerk, blowenfusen und poppencorken mit spitssparken. Ist nicht fur gewerken bei das dummkopfen. Das rubbernecken sightseeren keepen hands in das pockets-relaxen und watch das blinkenlights.

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    Quote Originally Posted by seasink View Post
    We Aussies are often amused at the English habit of (1) being shocked by the price of used cars here and (2) racing off and buying a new one! They last a lot longer when you don't salt the roads, and the used car buyer can avoid a lot of $$$ of depreciation. I usually hang on to a car until it is near its expiry date. Someone else can pay heavy depreciation

    Ha Ha bit like those Aussies who go to the UK but never go out of London then???
    No I am hopefully not your typical pom! I don't live in the Eastern Suburbs of Sydney and I would never buy a brand new car unless I was mega-rich (not going to happen any time soon!) And the price for a 4 year old top of its range car isn't bad IMO.

    Thanks for the link to the parts site. Good to know and the mechanic is just around the corner so I am off to say hi!
    Doing my best to buy this car but before I part with $13k I am going to be sure...like I said I am not rich!
    Cheers

  19. #19
    Contented Peugeot Driver addo's Avatar
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    Bargain hard and lay in a contingency sum; while consumables are well priced some dealer-only bits you might be best having sent across from the UK.
    pugnut1 likes this.

  20. #20
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    I really enjoy our 308 2l Hdi auto as we did the 307 we had with the same engine/drivetrain.
    Found that fitting slightly higher profile tyres can improve the ride and quiet to some extent .. used 205 60 16 Yokohamas...very quiet and considerably smoother than the Michelins . Try Taleb tyres Rockdale/Tempe area.
    I look forward to when we go back to 14/ 15" wheel with 80 profile rubber ...I live in hope!

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    Quote Originally Posted by SLC206 View Post
    The 2.0 HDi seems like a much more robust (or forgiving?) engine.

    AFAIK, both 1.6 and 2.0 HDi motors are belt driven from one cam - and then a chain on that cam drives the other cam.
    The earlier (and lower power) DW10 HDi motors only used a single camshaft, very reliable engines. The EW/DW10 block went on to have various heads installed on it over the years to improve power, and now sports the dual camshaft with a chain to link them.
    406 HDi

  22. #22
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    Having owned a Series 1 (MY09) and Series 2(MY12) 308 at some stage - the real difference is that the Series 2 version has a slightly higher nose and doesn't bottom out or scrape as much on speedbumps and deep driveways. Apart from that they were both good solid cars - although there really isn't much room for the kids consigned to seats 6 & 7. Most adults won't even fit back there.
    Save the earth, it's the only planet with chocolate.

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