Looking at High kilometers on SH 306XSI and XT
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  1. #1
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    Default Looking at High kilometers on SH 306XSI and XT

    When looking to buy a 306 XSI, I wonder what is the cut-off point after reaching 200,000kms. Obviously, the lower it is the better, but what is the experience of other owners about what to expect beyond that? clutch, timing belt, valve re-grind etc. Your comments may help in an making decision to buy. Thx

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  2. #2
    Fellow Frogger! Bruce Llewellyn's Avatar
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    Once over 200,000 km, it's all 'on condition'

    If you don't know when the timing belt was last changed, change it (inc new water pump) if it breaks, it bends the valves. Had a car turn up with bent inlets from being moved halfway through having a timing belt done. All parts are available, but it's a two day job. If the service intervals and timing belt changes have been observed, it isn't making valve gear noises (good mechanic will know) and the compression is good, it's Ok. Change the belt when next due. Valve re-grind is expensive. Head off job, and the valve adjustment is by selecting shims, setting up, measuring, tearing down...Check compression first.

    Rear beam bearings are said to die at 170,000km. There are threads on doing these or changing the rear beam (the whole rear axle / suspension assy that is.) Signs of tyre rubbing inside the rear wheel arches means the suspension bearings are knackered. Pig of a job to fix, not much hassle to change whole assembly.

    Original rear shock absorbers fail by going hard at around 220,000. You have to hold your toungue just right to get the top bolt in and out.

    Engine mounts (LH upper) might be on the way out.

    Exhaust system pipes and mounts- look for cracks / corrosion & non-genuine bodgy.

    Cooling system bits, such as the heater connections on the firewall need to be checked to see if they're leaking. They can be a pain to deal with.

    Make sure both cooling fans run, espeically with the AC on. With only one fan, the AC head pressures are high and risk of killing the compressor / blowing a hose. There is an overpressure cut off switch but it won't save an old hose.

    Cracked pipes on AC condensor (no aircon) If not fiddled with it won't have had flourescent dye in it, so leaks won't be visible. Genuine condensor is expensive, SH not worth the effort and aftermarket requires some skill to fit. Whole front has to come off the car- fiddly, but not difficult.

    driveshafts- If they knock, change them. If the boots are split / torn change them. Look for cracking in the rubber with the steering hard over. If there's black grease splattered around the driveshaft joints, DS need to be fixed / changed immediately, and you can argue a lower price. If it's just passed RWC, this will have been checked and will be Ok.

    Front brake hoses- these die at the body end at 200,000 / 20years. Available. 10 mins per side to change (did a set last night).

    Front roll bar links (plastic) check for wear, but RWC inspection will cover this.

    Clutch will be entirley on how it's been driven. I've seen a 404 clutch still over the minimum thickness at 270,000 miles. There are limits for position of the clutch fork which indicate clutch wear, but I don't have them to hand.

    Tail lights sometimes fill up with water from dust packing under the seal, or if the car has had minor rear panel damage. Taking them off, washing, drying and re-fitting with a smear of lanolin grease on the rubber seal stops this non-sense.

    Original fuses can crack- so they look Ok but will go open circuit if the contacts are wriggled. Best to change the lot for new ones of the same rating.

    Cartier relays- some can be replaced by Bosch, but not everything in a relay can is a relay. AC relay can die (located in fuse panel above driver's right knee)

    Nothing else goes terribly wrong with the 306 as far as we've experienced it.

    Hope you find a nice one, but expect to do some work to get it right, or pay top dollar for one someone else's kept up the maintenance to.

  3. #3
    Fellow Frogger!
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    If it looks nice and drives nice, then it probably is nice. All parts are available and not too expensive. The only killer in my experience is the heater core. If it has been bypassed then it needs replacing and it is a pig of a job. If the heater works and it doesn't smell like fertiliser, then that is OK.
    Erik

  4. #4
    Fellow Frogger! Tom_95's Avatar
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    I'm not trying to hijack this thread or anything, but does the above information apply to the later cars with the HDi diesels as well?
    1975 Peugeot 504 GL | 2018 Suzuki Swift GLX Turbo

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bruce Llewellyn View Post
    Once over 200,000 km, it's all 'on condition'

    Rear beam bearings are said to die at 170,000km. There are threads on doing these or changing the rear beam (the whole rear axle / suspension assy that is.) Signs of tyre rubbing inside the rear wheel arches means the suspension bearings are knackered. Pig of a job to fix, not much hassle to change whole assembly.

    Original rear shock absorbers fail by going hard at around 220,000. You have to hold your toungue just right to get the top bolt in and out.
    My 306XR is on 250,000km....sounds like I need this done to mine. Thanks for the info.

  6. #6
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    I'm a bit late, but thanks so much for this helpful thread. I've taken the plunge and ended up with a 1997 XT from Melbourne (179,000km) at a good price enabling me to spend a bit. The following failed the inspection -exhaust leak front of rear muffler; replacement of the anti-sway bar links(plastic) and the steering wheel because it has seen too much sun and the top twists. I ordered one but although the four spoke one, the car was a late 1997 build date and the earlier one is different when it comes to fitting the air-bag. I've also another in Sydney with my son, but will wait a while before bringing it back. It has 194,000 along with bills and log-book, but not enough info. to be sure of the timing belt. There is reference to replacement of a "drive belt" @ $90 done at 145,000km but I would think this would be the one driving the alternator, air-con etc. What do you think?

  7. #7
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    I took a look at a 1998 306GTI with 350,000kilometers on the odometer. The car has documentation all the way through with regular checks and changes of the timing belt, new exhaust and is in very good shape, both exterior and interior trim. Leather seats are a plus. In driving, I wondered if it drove as though 'tired', although performance was excellent. Price has come down to $3300, not cheap considering the kms. Any comments?

  8. #8
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    How does the above compare with a 1999XSI with 194,000 on the odometer at almost half the price? which is the better option?

  9. #9
    sans witticism SLC206's Avatar
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    Personally, I think you should just buy one already.
    Regards,

    Simon

    2018 308 GTi 2011 DS3 DSport
    ----
    2014 208 GTi 2007 207 GTi 2004 206 GTi180 2000 206 GTi 1995 306 XT

    www.peugeotclub.asn.au

  10. #10
    1000+ Posts Peter C's Avatar
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    Although high kilometres is obviously important I think, on an older car, there are other things that also come into play.

    Has it been serviced regularly and by whom - the owner or a mechanic?

    Has it been left out to bake in the hot summer sun and cold wet frosts of winter?

    Did the previous owner thrash it around or drive it sensibly?

  11. #11
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    In this case it has been faithfully serviced by authorised mechanics and dealers with full documentation. It has not been thrashed and owned by the present owner for seven years. I guess it gets back to the risk factor and also resale value. This all getrts back to asking price which I consider too high @ $3,300.

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