Carburettor for Series I 505
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  1. #1
    Fellow Frogger! 505604's Avatar
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    Default Carburettor for Series I 505

    Hi,

    My 1983 505 Familiale (converted from auto to 5 speed manual by a previous owner), according to a carburettor overhauler in Wagga Wagga, currently has a Weber DFV. Many various parts are very worn and/or warped and he says it isn't economical to repair. He can do it, but thinks it will cost me about $400 - $450. If that estimate is correct, I think I'd be hesitant to do it.

    What options are there for me, please? He says that there is a Holley 180 which should fit, but he isn't certain about throttle position/fittings. He also doesn't think that they're a very good carburettor, anyway. I don't know what the original carburettor was, as this Weber was fitted when I bought the car.

    I took some photos today, but didn't really know what people would need to see. Ask if you need to see photos for identifying various bits and I'll see if I have what you need! Or I can go tomorrow and take more photos

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    Thanks for any help.
    Andrew
    Current cars: Peugeot 307 HDi Touring; Peugeot 306 Cabriolet; Peugeot 406 HDi, Peugeot 505 Familiale
    Previous cars: 1965 Peugeot 404; 1972 Renault 16TS; 1970 Peugeo 504 1800; 1978 Peugeot 504 GL; 1976 Peugeot 504 LTI; 1984 Peugeot 505 Familiale; 1982 Peugeot 604 (converted to TD) 1999 Peugeot 306 Cabriolet (better car than the 2002 model we replaced it with)

  2. #2
    1000+ Posts robmac's Avatar
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    Falcon Weber is the go. Fits with minimum fuss. Especially on a manual.

    http://www.aussiefrogs.com/forum/sho...t=falcon+weber
    The less one interacts with rude, ignorant, critical and argumentative members. The more peaceful life becomes.

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    i had a Webber of a 2 litre ford on my 504 wagon ,escort /capre /cortina /minor mods to the linkage required ,i have a carb here that i baught fully recoed in a box but never used ,its twin choke, secondary is 27 mill r7407 on the base d13 and a11 on the float chamber but no name stamped any where/has coolent hoses going to the auto choke and a wire .pitty your so far away can send a pic if your interested .the webber i baught was found in an old pannel van the wreckers had full of carbs just had to scrounge through till i found something ,try your local ford club or front up to your local old school wreckers and show them it .try to avoid telling them what its off,all these cars are getting old now qnd finding a good one could be a problem there has to be a good one out there somewhere .PUGS

  4. #4
    Fellow Frogger! 505604's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by robmac View Post
    Falcon Weber is the go. Fits with minimum fuss. Especially on a manual.

    http://www.aussiefrogs.com/forum/sho...t=falcon+weber
    Rob, thanks for your reply and link to the previous thread.
    You talk about a square port XN engine. How do I identify that, please?

    Cheers,
    Andrew
    Current cars: Peugeot 307 HDi Touring; Peugeot 306 Cabriolet; Peugeot 406 HDi, Peugeot 505 Familiale
    Previous cars: 1965 Peugeot 404; 1972 Renault 16TS; 1970 Peugeo 504 1800; 1978 Peugeot 504 GL; 1976 Peugeot 504 LTI; 1984 Peugeot 505 Familiale; 1982 Peugeot 604 (converted to TD) 1999 Peugeot 306 Cabriolet (better car than the 2002 model we replaced it with)

  5. #5
    pur-john, not pew-john! peujohn's Avatar
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    Default Re: Carburettor for Series I 505

    If your 505 has its original engine it will be a square port.
    John W

    1979 Peugeot 504 GTI 2.2 litre 5 speed - 72 kW at the wheels

    1974 Peugeot 504 TI
    - now on the road

    2009 Peugeot 407 HDI wagon - family car

    Previous: 2005 407 HDI manual sedan, 1980 504 GL, 1990 405 Mi16, 1977 504 GL Special, 1984 505 SRD Turbo



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    Quote Originally Posted by peujohn View Post
    If your 505 has its original engine it will be a square port.
    Simple!
    Thanks,
    Andrew
    Current cars: Peugeot 307 HDi Touring; Peugeot 306 Cabriolet; Peugeot 406 HDi, Peugeot 505 Familiale
    Previous cars: 1965 Peugeot 404; 1972 Renault 16TS; 1970 Peugeo 504 1800; 1978 Peugeot 504 GL; 1976 Peugeot 504 LTI; 1984 Peugeot 505 Familiale; 1982 Peugeot 604 (converted to TD) 1999 Peugeot 306 Cabriolet (better car than the 2002 model we replaced it with)

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    Quote Originally Posted by 505604 View Post
    Hi,

    My 1983 505 Familiale (converted from auto to 5 speed manual by a previous owner), according to a carburettor overhauler in Wagga Wagga, currently has a Weber DFV. Many various parts are very worn and/or warped and he says it isn't economical to repair. He can do it, but thinks it will cost me about $400 - $450. If that estimate is correct, I think I'd be hesitant to do it.

    What options are there for me, please? He says that there is a Holley 180 which should fit, but he isn't certain about throttle position/fittings. He also doesn't think that they're a very good carburettor, anyway. I don't know what the original carburettor was, as this Weber was fitted when I bought the car.

    I took some photos today, but didn't really know what people would need to see. Ask if you need to see photos for identifying various bits and I'll see if I have what you need! Or I can go tomorrow and take more photos …

    Thanks for any help.
    Andrew

    I fitted a Weber on my 1980 504 wagon many years ago. We (well, Alan Robertson) had to play around with the jet sizes, otherwise it drank fuel. I was primarily after better performance as the original carby was still Ok. It bolted on quite easily and it was later converted to electric choke.

    A friend on mine had a Holley on his 504 for many years. There seems to be 2 camps - the Holley camp and the Weber camp, with the sort of arguments like you used to get between folks from Melbourne vs Sydney!
    1998 Peugeot 406 D8SV Manual
    1999 Peugeot 406 D8ST Auto
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    1994 Peuegot 306 N3 Cabriolet Manual
    1994 Peugeot 306 XR N3 Hatch
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  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by pugnut1 View Post
    with the sort of arguments like you used to get between folks from Melbourne vs Sydney!
    Used to?
    The mechanic who is doing the carburettor doesn't seem to mind Holley carburettors, per se, but definitely doesn't like the Holley 180.

    He told me this morning that I'm still like to be up for about $250-$300 for reconditioning the XE Falcon Weber carburettor when I find one. Does that sound about right? (They're all getting old now.)

    Cheers,
    Andrew
    Current cars: Peugeot 307 HDi Touring; Peugeot 306 Cabriolet; Peugeot 406 HDi, Peugeot 505 Familiale
    Previous cars: 1965 Peugeot 404; 1972 Renault 16TS; 1970 Peugeo 504 1800; 1978 Peugeot 504 GL; 1976 Peugeot 504 LTI; 1984 Peugeot 505 Familiale; 1982 Peugeot 604 (converted to TD) 1999 Peugeot 306 Cabriolet (better car than the 2002 model we replaced it with)

  9. #9
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    Don,t forget it is tuned for a 4 litre engine, could take some more hundreds to tune it to suit your engine.
    If you can find one fit an early 504 carby, the Solex with manual choke, these go the best of all.
    Graham

    Quote Originally Posted by 505604 View Post
    Used to?
    The mechanic who is doing the carburettor doesn't seem to mind Holley carburettors, per se, but definitely doesn't like the Holley 180.

    He told me this morning that I'm still like to be up for about $250-$300 for reconditioning the XE Falcon Weber carburettor when I find one. Does that sound about right? (They're all getting old now.)

    Cheers,
    Andrew

  10. #10
    con
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    Andrew,

    Call Carburetor Service Company in Burwood (NSW) and ask if they still do it and the price. Had mine done there but many years ago.



    con....



    Quote Originally Posted by 505604 View Post


    He told me this morning that I'm still like to be up for about $250-$300 for reconditioning the XE Falcon Weber carburettor when I find one. Does that sound about right? (They're all getting old now.)

    Cheers,
    Andrew

  11. #11
    Fellow Frogger! 505604's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by con View Post
    Andrew,

    Call Carburetor Service Company in Burwood (NSW) and ask if they still do it and the price. Had mine done there but many years ago.



    con....
    Thanks for reminding me about CSC, Con. I had my 404 done by them many, many years ago. It was quite a different car after they worked on it!
    Current cars: Peugeot 307 HDi Touring; Peugeot 306 Cabriolet; Peugeot 406 HDi, Peugeot 505 Familiale
    Previous cars: 1965 Peugeot 404; 1972 Renault 16TS; 1970 Peugeo 504 1800; 1978 Peugeot 504 GL; 1976 Peugeot 504 LTI; 1984 Peugeot 505 Familiale; 1982 Peugeot 604 (converted to TD) 1999 Peugeot 306 Cabriolet (better car than the 2002 model we replaced it with)

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by GRAHAM WALLIS View Post
    Don,t forget it is tuned for a 4 litre engine, could take some more hundreds to tune it to suit your engine.
    If you can find one fit an early 504 carby, the Solex with manual choke, these go the best of all.
    Graham
    Yes, Graham. Like many other things that Peugeot does, I do like to stick to original when going for replacement bits, but I've been searching for the last few days and haven't seen any Solex carburettors for sale. (I know that I'm not always the best at searching.)
    Cheers
    Current cars: Peugeot 307 HDi Touring; Peugeot 306 Cabriolet; Peugeot 406 HDi, Peugeot 505 Familiale
    Previous cars: 1965 Peugeot 404; 1972 Renault 16TS; 1970 Peugeo 504 1800; 1978 Peugeot 504 GL; 1976 Peugeot 504 LTI; 1984 Peugeot 505 Familiale; 1982 Peugeot 604 (converted to TD) 1999 Peugeot 306 Cabriolet (better car than the 2002 model we replaced it with)

  13. #13
    1000+ Posts Wildebeest's Avatar
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    505 604,
    I've been running a Weber DGAV [Cortina] on my '79 504 for some time. It runs, starts etc OK [manual choke]. Economy ? Still 504 autos weren't too clever in that dept.

    I've recently been comparing my carb with a Weber from a Falcon.
    Something I think that has been previously discussed ie. The primary throat on the Cortina Weber is nearest the engine whereas the Falcon Weber's primary throat is furthest.

    There are two passages, obviously, on the square port manifold. The question is what is the best set up to use, the slightly convoluted inner passage for the primary or the more free-er outer passage?
    This could be a question for the gas flow theorists out there.
    Some say that the Falcon Weber goes quite well with original jetting.

    Looking at the Falcon Weber it has a few more donglet attachments to it than the simpler Cortina unit.
    On removing one I found it has something to do with gas fume venting from the carb? If I were to use the Falcon carb I would remove and blank this off then vent the carb from the top of the float bowl cover [to the charcoal canister]
    Another is what appears to be a power valve. The other fitting with 4 screws and what appears to be a diaphragm along with a small vacuum spout remains a mystery.
    The fuel fitting would have to be modified also from 8mm to 6mm to suit the Peugeot hose size.

    I wont go on, this is plenty for anyone interested for now

  14. #14
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    The square port just has a big space.
    It is the early ones which have a small port in the centre for the primary venturi and two outer ones for the secondary venturi, a brilliant set up I think.
    Graham

    Quote Originally Posted by Wildebeest View Post
    505 604,
    I've been running a Weber DGAV [Cortina] on my '79 504 for some time. It runs, starts etc OK [manual choke]. Economy ? Still 504 autos weren't too clever in that dept.

    I've recently been comparing my carb with a Weber from a Falcon.
    Something I think that has been previously discussed ie. The primary throat on the Cortina Weber is nearest the engine whereas the Falcon Weber's primary throat is furthest.

    There are two passages, obviously, on the square port manifold. The question is what is the best set up to use, the slightly convoluted inner passage for the primary or the more free-er outer passage?
    This could be a question for the gas flow theorists out there.
    Some say that the Falcon Weber goes quite well with original jetting.

    Looking at the Falcon Weber it has a few more donglet attachments to it than the simpler Cortina unit.
    On removing one I found it has something to do with gas fume venting from the carb? If I were to use the Falcon carb I would remove and blank this off then vent the carb from the top of the float bowl cover [to the charcoal canister]
    Another is what appears to be a power valve. The other fitting with 4 screws and what appears to be a diaphragm along with a small vacuum spout remains a mystery.
    The fuel fitting would have to be modified also from 8mm to 6mm to suit the Peugeot hose size.

    I wont go on, this is plenty for anyone interested for now

  15. #15
    1000+ Posts robmac's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Wildebeest View Post


    ..... The other fitting with 4 screws and what appears to be a diaphragm along with a small vacuum spout remains a mystery.
    ...
    The square doover under the fuel inlet with the screw atop and the 8mm spigot is an fast idle device. When vacuum
    is applied to the port the idle speed increases as per the screw setting.

    I use this device for aircon idle up in conjunction with an electrically operated (off the compressor clutch)vacuum solenoid valve harvested from a Toyota.

    I believe that Falcons use it to hold the idle speed up for pollution compliance reasons.

    I have attached a useful document about the Weber.

    Sorry, no I can't I'm not allowed to upload 107kb. Tough.
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  16. #16
    1000+ Posts Wildebeest's Avatar
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    Thanks Graham and Robmac for your replies re the manifolds and the mystery vacuum "doover".
    Will remove and examine the latter to see if it could be blanked also for application on the 504.

    Oh, I forgot to mention the Falc Weber has an electric choke
    I threw the heated type choke on my ex Cort Weber away to reduce the bulkiness on the carb. Have adapted my own design of manual choke, unfortunately, or not, it has done away with the fast idle. A bit of deft footwork keeps it alight when cold.

    My first experiment with a Weber conversion on the 504 was with the simple 28/36 DCD model. Very uncomplicated gem of a carb. Ex early GT Escort. Even with its 24mm [both] venturis it performed well. Would have liked to alter the venturi sizes [removable on this carb] as I suspect the small venturis may have "choked" its performance?

    I was informed that the formula Ford racing cars specified this carb and possibly the venturi sizes.
    I bought the 28/36 DCD carb at an autojumble, it had been blasted clean, new jetting and in a WEBER box. $50 ! Chew On That !.
    Last edited by Wildebeest; 1st December 2012 at 01:10 PM.

  17. #17
    Fellow Frogger! 505604's Avatar
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    Wildebeest, if you find another one like that for the same price
    Current cars: Peugeot 307 HDi Touring; Peugeot 306 Cabriolet; Peugeot 406 HDi, Peugeot 505 Familiale
    Previous cars: 1965 Peugeot 404; 1972 Renault 16TS; 1970 Peugeo 504 1800; 1978 Peugeot 504 GL; 1976 Peugeot 504 LTI; 1984 Peugeot 505 Familiale; 1982 Peugeot 604 (converted to TD) 1999 Peugeot 306 Cabriolet (better car than the 2002 model we replaced it with)

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