403 Steering Wheel
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  1. #1
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    Default 403 Steering Wheel

    WTB: 403 steering wheel .

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  2. #2
    Fellow Frogger!
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    Quote Originally Posted by grant154 View Post
    WTB: 403 steering wheel .
    Plenty of good ones for sale on www.ebay.fr don't know how you would go getting them here.
    I got some stuff there about a year ago and one order arrived after about three months wait and the other did not.

    I am thinking about sending mine to a guy in Brisbane, don't ask me his name, who did a truck steering wheel for me about 6 years ago. He does a good job but it is bloody expensive.
    Ebay.fr has them for under 40 euros.

    Regards Graham

  3. #3
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    Default 403 steering wheel

    Graham , no need to have it done by expensive guy in Brisbane , is an easy job for yourself. Grind out cracks , chemically clean , fill cracks with plastic bumper bar repair putty , when hardened , smooth out with wet and dry , prime , paint with acrylic lacquer in pressure pack can , will look good like a new wheel . I did a Mercedes wheel 10 years ago , still looks as new.
    Most cars of the fifties had plastic steering wheels painted with nitro cellulose lacquer ( DUCO ) , problem with the FJ Holdens was that hand pressure on the wheel over time wore off the Duco. Present day Acrylic is much more durable and will last the lifetime of any restored car steering wheel.

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by Restorer View Post
    Graham , no need to have it done by expensive guy in Brisbane , is an easy job for yourself. Grind out cracks , chemically clean , fill cracks with plastic bumper bar repair putty , when hardened , smooth out with wet and dry , prime , paint with acrylic lacquer in pressure pack can , will look good like a new wheel . I did a Mercedes wheel 10 years ago , still looks as new.
    Most cars of the fifties had plastic steering wheels painted with nitro cellulose lacquer ( DUCO ) , problem with the FJ Holdens was that hand pressure on the wheel over time wore off the Duco. Present day Acrylic is much more durable and will last the lifetime of any restored car steering wheel.
    Thanks for the tip. I'll give it a go.

    Regards Graham

  5. #5
    Fellow Frogger! Commerciale's Avatar
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    Not quite right advice. I think Restorer is referring to the painted hard rubber steering wheels which were only fitted to the more utilitarian Peugeots (wagons and utes). These ar black under the paint.

    I suspect that you have a 403 sedan, which has a plastic wheel. Be aware that the solvents in acryic laquer will fry up plastics, leaving you with a rather ugly mess. If you do decide to paint the plastic it will have to be with an enamel. Cracks can best be filled with a two-part epoxy putty (from Bunnings PPC etc).

  6. #6
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    I am not referring to hard rubber wheels. Have used process on Mercedes and 403 B plastic wheels. Perhaps the solvent problem Commerciale refers to could be with 2pack acrylic , I used spray can paints , in any case , try a sample first to see if lifting occurs. I would prefer to use the filler specifically designed for plastic bumpers , if you don't want the expense of a separate filler , by all means use bog , but be prepared to rework it if it falls out.

  7. #7
    Fellow Frogger! Commerciale's Avatar
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    Some points of clarification. Sprayable acrylic lacquer is mixed two parts solvent to one part colour and dries by sovent evaporation - hence the solvent may attack the base material. Two-pack uses considerably less solvent and dries by catalytic action. Acrylic lacquer also needs to be polished, unlike two-pack which has gloss straight off the gun.

    I was not referring to bog as a filler but rather to two pack epoxy putty. This material dries rock hard and will repair cracks rather than just fill them - a major consideration when the cracks are at the stress points of the wheel.

    If you do manage to get away with using acrylic lacquer on plastic you might consider a way of restoring the original plastic gloss. Rather than polishing the lacquer you can apply a coat or two of clear polyurethane (estapol or similar) over the colour coats.

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