Be aware - new French Road rules
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  1. #1
    1000+ Posts gerry freed's Avatar
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    Default Be aware - new French Road rules

    With a 15% increase in road deaths this year, the government has tightened up controls on drivers yet again.
    Should you be caught at 50kms over the speed limit you face a 3850 euro fine, 3 months in prison, a loss of six points and confiscation of the vehicle..
    All signs indicating the radar installations are to be removed. It will be illegal to sell and use radar detectors and radio, phone or internet warnings of radar( sale of these devices carries a prison sentence.. The positions of fixed radars will no longer be published and another 1000 will be installed by the end of 2012.
    Blood alcohol over .8gms/litre costs 8 points and the legal maximum is 0;5gms/L. Above that you will not be allowed to drive on.
    They are moving towards banning the total use of mobile phones by drivers but at the moment hands free is still permitted. The fine is increased and it is a 3 points offence.
    Driving on the emergency strip will cost you 135 euros and three points.

    If you have a UK licence the points will be applied. With an Australian one underpinning an international licence the points situation is not clear but in serious offences, prison and vehicle confiscation is possible.

    At least the garde à vue situation has changed and the police can't lock you up for interrogation without access to a lawyer.

    Forget Mr. Toad driving habits and just follow the procession!

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    As in Australia, you legislate against stupidity, though!!
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    Quote Originally Posted by gerry freed View Post
    With an Australian one underpinning an international licence the points situation is not clear but in serious offences, prison and vehicle confiscation is possible.
    What does this mean? Do you need one of the silly NRMA-issued, non-Government "International Driver Permits" in France?

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    We have now travelled to France and Germany and NZ without IDPs. You get laughed at if you produce one.

    All anyone seems interested in is your proper licence and your passport.
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    1000+ Posts gerry freed's Avatar
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    Yes, it is only treated as a translation of your real licence. I never bothered in Europe although Italy was funny about them.
    I have never been asked for one by car hire companies, only the police want to know what the fields are on your foreign licence.
    French police have sufficient English not to be deterred by an Antipodean one.
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    Quote Originally Posted by gerry freed View Post
    French police have sufficient English
    How has this been allowed to happen?

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    Never mind "following the procession" - just bloody stick to the road rules & speed limits: it's no goddam different to driving in Oz. No transgression = no problem.

    The ultimate solution is along the lines of - reduce the birth rate/lower the global population (doubt that will ever happen...) or introduce draconian road laws along with improved public transport (see previous line's parenthetic comment ...) so that there are dramatically fewer vehicles on the road - currently too many drivers are carrying over-charged levels of testosterone with an "irresistable" urge to prove themselves "above the law".
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    It has been a prerequisite to join the gendarmerie for some years now and it is slowly filtering through. Because of the large numbers of British tourists passing through en route to Spain and those who tour or live in France, the English speaking traffic offenders in the Pas de Calais are numerous. To handle the problem they have in past summers swapped police with some of the Kentish force, which helps.
    It is not easy to know what the speed limits are, even for locals - they do not have to be marked unless an urban conurbation chooses to have a speed limit different to the standard - and they can and do. Get a copy of the road rules and make a judgment on unmarked roads on the basis of the quality of road, urban density and the weather - all of which affect the legal limit

    The government attributes the problem, I believe correctly, to just bad driving. The penalties alone are not going to solve much except improve the government ability to capture more right wing voters. They accept that driver education is a need and have introduced a number of initiatives especially for the young. However the young believe in their own immortality and are selectively deaf, so that also is of limited potential. The move towards two wheeled transport has itself created a new trend in personal injuries and mortality. That will be reduced by more separation from faster moving heavy objects as they ban 4wd, trucks and then cars from the city centres. The idea of making cyclists wear a yellow reflective jacket has failed miserably and is unenforceable.

    Meanwhile, be very aware that there is an unofficial but real 3rd lane between the lines of slow moving traffic on the peripherique and other urban 'fast' roads. The motor bikes and scooters come between the cars with impunity and so you must leave space for their 'lane',crossing lanes with great caution and much use of mirrors.
    On those blocked roads, check you mirrors often, especially when stationary. Scooter drivers often fold back your mirror so that they can get through.
    Last edited by gerry freed; 12th May 2011 at 09:54 PM.
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    Quote Originally Posted by gerry freed View Post
    It has been a prerequisite to join the gendarmerie for some years now and it is slowly filtering through. Because of the large numbers of British tourists passing through en route to Spain and those who tour or live in France, the English speaking traffic offenders in the Pas de Calais are numerous. To handle the problem they have in past summers swapped police with some of the Kentish force, which helps.
    It is not easy to know what the speed limits are, even for locals - they do not have to be marked unless an urban conurbation chooses to have a speed limit different to the standard - and they can and do. Get a copy of the road rules and make a judgment on unmarked roads on the basis of the quality of road, urban density and the weather - all of which affect the legal limit

    The government attributes the problem, I believe correctly, to just bad driving. The penalties alone are not going to solve much except improve the government ability to capture more right wing voters. They accept that driver education is a need and have introduced a number of initiatives especially for the young. However the young believe in their own immortality and are selectively deaf, so that also is of limited potential. The move towards two wheeled transport has itself created a new trend in personal injuries and mortality. That will be reduced by more separation from faster moving heavy objects as they ban 4wd, trucks and then cars from the city centres. The idea of making cyclists wear a yellow reflective jacket has failed miserably and is unenforceable.

    Meanwhile, be very aware that there is an unofficial but real 3rd lane between the lines of slow moving traffic on the peripherique and other urban 'fast' roads. The motor bikes and scooters come between the cars with impunity and so you must leave space for their 'lane',crossing lanes with great caution and much use of mirrors.
    On those blocked roads, check you mirrors often, especially when stationary. Scooter drivers often fold back your mirror so that they can get through.
    In every state in OZ, I believe that the traffic laws make it illegal to "form another lane" between cars whether they are moving or not. You can be booked for not being obeying lane signals, and although motorcyclists and scooter riders act like they are perfectly entitled to "Filter", they are in fact breaking the law. There is also no law stating motorists cannot open one or more doors when they are stationary!
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    The difficulty for visitors in France is that there is the law and there is common practice. This is not a law abiding country in the way that Australia is. Many, if not most, here take the view that the country has two legal systems, one for them and one for all the others. So on the road certain practice arises which is either not covered by the law or the law is generally ignoring.
    They tried to introduce Swedish style headlight on the daytime. The legislation was put in place and it was largely ignored. After a few fines and warnings the police gave up and it faded away. Similarly last year the rules were changed to force cyclists to wear reflective jackets. I saw the police lecturing a few teenagers outside the Uni gates but other than that, nothing happened. Cyclists couldn't be bothered and short of arresting a few million people the police have apparently given up. The motor bike use of the gaps between the lanes is illegal but widely used even by the police. The rule is not enforced as to so many it represents a value greater than the risks perceived. You can't drive and ignore the scooters because you are in the right. There is no pleasure in killing people because they find the road rules inappropriate.
    Simply, the only way of getting around Paris so as to get to a meeting on time is go on two wheels and use all the road space left by static cars. Similarly, with the high price of Paris housing, many of the service workers and middle class executives are forced to live outside and commute. If there is no public transport where they are, many choose to travel on two wheels to avoid several hours per day stuck in a static car. The public attitude is good luck to them and people give way. The peripherique is often static in the rush hour for several kms at a stretch and so everyone positions themselves so that the bikes can get through. If you block the gap you may not only get abused by the rider but by the car drivers around.

    You will also find that as the old priority to the right is being slowly phased out by priority to the main road or a stop sign, so many people stick to the generation in which they passed their test and treat the priority accordingly. You need to watch out with especial care in villages where the driving population is well over fifty. In this town, the council spent a lot of money trying to reduce the minor accidents on suburban junctions by putting yield and stop sign with white lines. I suddenly realised a couple of months ago as someone forced me to brake by coming out of a side road without stopping, that they have taken nearly all of them away and reverted to priority to the right.
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    Sadly I think Australia is heading the same way. Maybe it's because most of us are "Europeans?"
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kim Luck View Post
    Sadly I think Australia is heading the same way. Maybe it's because most of us are "Europeans?"
    Blame urban congestion, not racial origins.
    The result of an overbearing Nanny and smart kids is that the biscuit tin gets raided behind her back. France has an over intrusive Republic in personal, family and corporate life and so it fosters silent rebellion. The best way to foster non-conformists is to demand conformity.
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    Quote Originally Posted by gerry freed View Post

    You will also find that as the old priority to the right is being slowly phased out by priority to the main road or a stop sign, so many people stick to the generation in which they passed their test and treat the priority accordingly. You need to watch out with especial care in villages where the driving population is well over fifty. In this town, the council spent a lot of money trying to reduce the minor accidents on suburban junctions by putting yield and stop sign with white lines. I suddenly realised a couple of months ago as someone forced me to brake by coming out of a side road without stopping, that they have taken nearly all of them away and reverted to priority to the right.
    The way that is (or isn't) happening is remarkable!

    As for those fines, I do worry about Girl605....
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    Common sense tells me education is probably the only thing that will really curb the road toll effectively, well... education and patients... you will never get overnight results when trying to lower road deaths. of course you will never bring the toll to 0, they can bring on stricter rules, but that wont prevent mistakes, education might. But hey, since when did beurocrats run on common sense.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kim Luck View Post
    Sadly I think Australia is heading the same way. Maybe it's because most of us are "Europeans?"

    Most europeans in Australia are brits if we are to believe the statistics and brits are credited with better road manners in europe.

    Most europeans are very observant of the law in their own countries and quite prudent when abroad. it is only those who think they can't be caught that break the laws abroad, but even that is no longer an escape.

    Don't hold much hope for education either because people don't like it. Check the school dropout stats.
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    Quote Originally Posted by schlitzaugen View Post
    Most europeans in Australia are brits if we are to believe the statistics and brits are credited with better road manners in europe.
    Not here they're not! Last time I was in the UK with French friends they were unwilling to drive because of what they saw as dangerous driving practice. The Motorways are so overloaded that they drive at speeds and bumper spacings that are not only illegal in France but a challenge to anyone's reflexes. It is no wonder that the ring road round London has daily multiple shunts.
    I won't bore you with the rude racist remarks from louts in Cambridgeshire because we were driving a French registered car or the incompetent and impatient van driver in Kent who scraped his wing mirror alongside my H van and didn't seem to care that he had smashed it.
    Then there the English that I have met on the wrong side of the road at junctions in the Charente and those treating the country lanes like Silverstone, cornering on the wrong side without caring about the possibility of oncoming traffic.
    I have driven for 25 years in the UK and would rather drive here in France any day, 25 years ago I would have said the reverse but the French have invested heavily in their road network and driving has become a much more sedate affair.
    Apart from Paris, which will soon be free of cars anyway, driving is much lower in stress and very much freer of road rage incidents in my recent experience than the UK.
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    Quote Originally Posted by gerry freed View Post
    The difficulty for visitors in France is that there is the law and there is common practice. This is not a law abiding country in the way that Australia is. Many, if not most, here take the view that the country has two legal systems, one for them and one for all the others. So on the road certain practice arises which is either not covered by the law or the law is generally ignoring.
    They tried to introduce Swedish style headlight on the daytime. The legislation was put in place and it was largely ignored. After a few fines and warnings the police gave up and it faded away. Similarly last year the rules were changed to force cyclists to wear reflective jackets. I saw the police lecturing a few teenagers outside the Uni gates but other than that, nothing happened. Cyclists couldn't be bothered and short of arresting a few million people the police have apparently given up. The motor bike use of the gaps between the lanes is illegal but widely used even by the police. The rule is not enforced as to so many it represents a value greater than the risks perceived. You can't drive and ignore the scooters because you are in the right. There is no pleasure in killing people because they find the road rules inappropriate.
    Simply, the only way of getting around Paris so as to get to a meeting on time is go on two wheels and use all the road space left by static cars. Similarly, with the high price of Paris housing, many of the service workers and middle class executives are forced to live outside and commute. If there is no public transport where they are, many choose to travel on two wheels to avoid several hours per day stuck in a static car. The public attitude is good luck to them and people give way. The peripherique is often static in the rush hour for several kms at a stretch and so everyone positions themselves so that the bikes can get through. If you block the gap you may not only get abused by the rider but by the car drivers around.

    You will also find that as the old priority to the right is being slowly phased out by priority to the main road or a stop sign, so many people stick to the generation in which they passed their test and treat the priority accordingly. You need to watch out with especial care in villages where the driving population is well over fifty. In this town, the council spent a lot of money trying to reduce the minor accidents on suburban junctions by putting yield and stop sign with white lines. I suddenly realised a couple of months ago as someone forced me to brake by coming out of a side road without stopping, that they have taken nearly all of them away and reverted to priority to the right.
    Love the French logic! Why on earth not use all the road when the vehicle fits through?
    The daylight lights on 'thing' is another annoying invention (in clear weather). What on earth does one expect when driving on a road - aircrafts, tanks... . Even the great big wank tanks like Audi Qsomething have these annoying lights shine into the rear view mirror during the day.


    In every state in OZ, I believe that the traffic laws make it illegal to "form another lane" between cars whether they are moving or not. You can be booked for not being obeying lane signals, and although motorcyclists and scooter riders act like they are perfectly entitled to "Filter", they are in fact breaking the law. There is also no law stating motorists cannot open one or more doors when they are stationary!
    Interesting. We were always told to turn around when opening a car door to see if something/one is passing. In fact, if one did not do that when taking the driving licence test it was an immediate fail. Common sense really? Why would one cause an accident just because of being to lazy to turn around.

    Hogging the roadway is another of my pet hates. It increases travel time and pollution.

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    Quote Originally Posted by JoBo View Post
    Love the French logic! Why on earth not use all the road when the vehicle fits through?
    The daylight lights on 'thing' is another annoying invention (in clear weather). What on earth does one expect when driving on a road - aircrafts, tanks... . Even the great big wank tanks like Audi Qsomething have these annoying lights shine into the rear view mirror during the day.




    Interesting. We were always told to turn around when opening a car door to see if something/one is passing. In fact, if one did not do that when taking the driving licence test it was an immediate fail. Common sense really? Why would one cause an accident just because of being to lazy to turn around.

    Hogging the roadway is another of my pet hates. It increases travel time and pollution.

    I too hate these new lights the cars have and the drivers' manners.

    Opening a car's door in front of an oncoming car is illegal in SA, that's why they teach you to check. Not sure about other states.



    Quote Originally Posted by gerry freed View Post
    Not here they're not! Last time I was in the UK with French friends they were unwilling to drive because of what they saw as dangerous driving practice. The Motorways are so overloaded that they drive at speeds and bumper spacings that are not only illegal in France but a challenge to anyone's reflexes. It is no wonder that the ring road round London has daily multiple shunts.
    I won't bore you with the rude racist remarks from louts in Cambridgeshire because we were driving a French registered car or the incompetent and impatient van driver in Kent who scraped his wing mirror alongside my H van and didn't seem to care that he had smashed it.
    Then there the English that I have met on the wrong side of the road at junctions in the Charente and those treating the country lanes like Silverstone, cornering on the wrong side without caring about the possibility of oncoming traffic.
    I have driven for 25 years in the UK and would rather drive here in France any day, 25 years ago I would have said the reverse but the French have invested heavily in their road network and driving has become a much more sedate affair.
    Apart from Paris, which will soon be free of cars anyway, driving is much lower in stress and very much freer of road rage incidents in my recent experience than the UK.
    I said they were credited not that they deserve the credit.

    And I was talking about the way the brits drive at home, not abroad.

    In their defense, everybody is driving more carefully where they know they're easy to catch and have no escape if they're caught.

    Same can be said about most europeans though, and I don't subscribe to the opinion that the brits have better road manners than others anyway. It may be just that in Oz we're bombarded with "everything british is better" wank, perhaps.
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    I thought "everything British is better " died out about twenty years ago. Economically Australia is now firmly anchored in Asia and firmly multi cultural with a 50/50 attitude to becoming a Republic;

    Anyway, back on topic, the French objections to the rule changes are now getting air time. The obvious one is the argument that the radars are just revenue collectors. The statistics are that the fixed radars detected 11 million speeding infractions in 2010 and they resulted in 4.6 million fines. That would be about 350 million euros from 2,800 radars.
    It is claimed that they saved 23,000 lives since 2002. In 2010 France got its road mortality down to under 4000.

    Here are some statistics quoted to prove that the UK motorways are the safest in Europe in spite of traffic density and that they should raise their speed limit
    http://www.abd.org.uk/safest_roads.htm
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    Quote Originally Posted by JoBo View Post

    "Interesting. We were always told to turn around when opening a car door to see if something/one is passing. In fact, if one did not do that when taking the driving licence test it was an immediate fail. Common sense really? Why would one cause an accident just because of being to lazy to turn around."

    Hogging the roadway is another of my pet hates. It increases travel time and pollution.

    My beef is not so much opening doors, although that would be still legal anyway because the motorcycle rider should have pulled up behind the 25th car behind me anyway and could not be expected to be on-coming traffic as everyone should in fact be stationary. It is illegal to form another lane between cars and you can be booked for not observing traffic lanes in Victoria. Whether you would ever see a Copper booking anyone for doing that is a moot point because apparently Occ-Health and Safety has them bottled up in the local Coppery drinking coffee 'cos it's a mad world out there!

    Local pollution is caused in Metropolitan Melbourne by:

    1/. Cars

    2/. Freeways owned by private companies that control traffic flows under their agreement with the local state government

    3/. Councils like Port Phillip and others that have so many uncontrolled pedestrian crossings and traffic lights they might as well be under the control of 2/. above.
    Last edited by Kim Luck; 16th May 2011 at 10:33 PM.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kim Luck View Post
    My beef is not so much opening doors, although that would be still legal anyway because the motorcycle rider should have pulled up behind the 25th car behind me anyway and could not be expected to be on-coming traffic as everyone should in fact be stationary. It is illegal to form another lane between cars and you can be booked for not observing traffic lanes in Victoria. Whether you would ever see a Copper booking anyone for doing that is a moot point because apparently Occ-Health and Safety has them bottled up in the local Coppery drinking coffee 'cos it's a mad world out there!

    Local pollution is caused in Metropolitan Melbourne by:

    1/. Cars

    2/. Freeways owned by private companies that control traffic flows under their agreement with the local state government

    3/. Councils like Port Phillip and others that have so many uncontrolled pedestrian crossings and traffic lights they might as well be under the control of 2/. above.
    Our views differ. I have no problem with two wheelers moving between cars (and no, i don't ride a bike of any description on the road). Live and let live, forget stupid rules.
    Why not utilze the road to the max. when it means reduced travel times, reduced congestion etc.?

    E.G. this wasted space:

    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Be aware - new French Road rules-p1020248.jpg   Be aware - new French Road rules-p1020249.jpg  
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    Quote Originally Posted by gerry freed View Post
    I thought "everything British is better " died out about twenty years ago. Economically Australia is now firmly anchored in Asia and firmly multi cultural with a 50/50 attitude to becoming a Republic;

    [...]

    You'd be surprised. Most of our population still comes from the good ole country. The change in attitude towards monarchy might be a reflection of what happens at home as much as a shift in the opinion of local population, whilst the economy is ruled by money.
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    Most of, the population is Australian born and therefore most probably Australian, not British. I wrote this just a few years ago:----

    AUSTRALIA - THE FIRST GLOBAL NATION

    Resenting the superficiality of a visiting French journalist who wrote of the lack of a definitive Australian dish, I revisited an old dream of defining a new Australian cuisine. My conclusion is that our choice of food and its preparation is a totem whose detailed carvings well represent the emerging national identity.

    To develop a distinctive cuisine, one has to have relative isolation. It needs the slow evolutionary process of maximising harmony with the rest of the local ecology and fostering the most efficient and pleasurable use of the food sources available. The Aborigines did this over tens of thousands of years eating a combination of foods known to no others. When isolation ended, so did the relevance of cuisine to a balanced ecology. The settlers arrived complete with a consumption pattern demanding a restricted range of monocultural agriculture which they imposed on the land with mixed success. Settling land is about survival, giving little motivation for experimentation with the necessities of life. Eating habits stayed a subset of the imported pattern.

    The subsequent waves of migration in this century, have come to a land with the wealth to import specialised foods to minimise the needs for them to change their eating preferences. The land also was sufficiently large and diverse for entrepreneurial farmers to settle and plant or herd imported species to meet their needs. The transport costs of importing and exporting food has fallen with the rising technology of packaging and preservation, such that it is lost in the differences between production costs in different countries.

    The outcome is a Darling Street of restaurants each representing the culinary achievements of imported cultures but taking advantage of a local predominant but global compendium of ingredients. Isolation has truly departed with TV series and glossy magazines on eating constantly available from across the world.

    The factors that create differentiation have largely disappeared and new ideas are absorbed in new ways. The interfaces between different cultural histories create original contributions. Where else might an Italian-Japanese or a an Anglo-Thai restaurant be attempted? Any significant stylistic change is a likely to be marketed across the world as used to provide a separate influence in Australia.

    It is too late to evolve an Australian cuisine; it is now the time to influence a global pattern of enjoyment of good food. But this is being done by disseminating ideas on the special characteristics of well understood Australian ingredients and some unique blending of flavours created in Australian kitchens.
    At the same time we continue to absorb influences from our residents and the pressures from powerful communicators like the U.S.A.

    It is no contradiction that with a totem carved in a hundred styles and augmented by passing tribes, we have no single icon we can agree on as a motif for a flag. The Union Jack in the corner is obsolete. Today's flag is a patchwork quilt. If it is to recognise the weighting of the cultural contributions of the population then it has a large Union Jack and Irish emblem sewn within fields of Southern European and South East Asian patches, some fragments of Middle Europe and the Middle East and somewhere, a golden Australian sun struggling to keep above an ochre horizon. If it were to reflect the actual cultural richness it would include a very large Star Spangled banner and a rising red sun.

    Each of our ethnic groups is so recent in local presence that it maintains a strong link with its original heritage, while sharing sufficient of local values to participate in the broader community. A special feature of the core Anglo Celtic community base has been its ability to accept this in a benign way, which does differentiate Australia from say, Germany or Japan.
    Communication into Australia, even without the superhighways, is so rich that much of the teenage culture of this and the previous generation has largely been forged in California and London. Migration is no longer a move to a new world with a cutting off from family and community linkages. The Italian, Greeks and Chinese in particular have used it to extend a cultural and commercial network.

    Australia is a place, not a people or a race or a tribe. As a community, its linkages with others overseas are for many, stronger than those across its large geography.

    It is too late to differentiate a national identity. The convergence of communication technologies and their global impact on education and entertainment will end the opportunity to stand apart and develop a distinctive grouping. Global economic interdependence and the global scope of finance will inhibit any nation from stepping outside market defined norms of resource management and consumption.
    Those for whom history has allowed a national identity to form and deepen, can expect to see its edges soften through the impacts of these forces and perhaps experience the pains of reaction. Those who have not have less baggage to carry on the journey into a sharing of the globe by the human species.

    Australia is no United Nations. Its population represents a mix by number and influence which is quite different to the world at large. Government and the professions are essentially Anglo Celtic. Segments of the economy are dominated by certain ethnic groups which only loosely relate to the global picture. The way we accommodate that in a compromise driven democracy is in itself special. It needs to be better understood and encouraged.

    Gerry Freed 22 June 1994
    Think Global - Ride on Spheres

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    Quote Originally Posted by gerry freed View Post

    [...]

    Dear Gerry,

    I admire and respect your ideas and sometimes, though it may not look like it, I even agree with them.

    I agree, most people who live here were born here. But most are of english origin and even when not, they are immersed in a culture which is largely copied from the old country and passed down as tradition for lack of a better word (status quo if you want). Desire to be accepted of those who are not drive them to adopt the values of the majority with more or less critical analysis. These values emanate largely from the top (and I am not talking about movies, etc., even though that too contributes). I am talking about the values instilled in society. They come on various channels, one of the most important being political (there are also commercial, social, etc). The political power however is dominant as it determines the framework for everything else to unfold. And in the political life, I see very few other than english people. Sure, they're born here, they claim australianity (hehe) but what I hear from them is only ideas regurgitated from the old kingdom. Not that they're all bad, but I would like to see some imagination at least.

    The republican dispute you mentioned is a case in point. I have seen a lot of people who have no idea what monarchy is (people from contries with no monarchs as well as people from countries with a glorious history under monarchies abolished recently in historic terms) but want to keep it.

    Well, we're not gonna have sharia law, the tv tells me.

    And for the record, I have no opinion on the monarchy vs republic issue (I don't even vote). I just take that as a barometer if you will.
    ACHTUNG ALLES LOOKENPEEPERS

    Das computermachine is nicht fur gefingerpoken und mittengrabben. Ist easy schnappen der springenwerk, blowenfusen und poppencorken mit spitssparken. Ist nicht fur gewerken bei das dummkopfen. Das rubbernecken sightseeren keepen hands in das pockets-relaxen und watch das blinkenlights.

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