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Thread: Parts Washers

  1. #1
    Fellow Frogger! four_plus_two's Avatar
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    Default Parts Washers

    Anyone have much experience with using a parts washer? Just want to know what size tank/bowl I'll need to wash up to coil spring size parts.

    I'm getting sick of spending hours scrubbing brake parts and hubs with degreaser and a toothbrush

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    They seem to be on Ebay for around $100, do these things last more than a few weeks? Supercheap have washers listed for ~$180.

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  2. #2
    COL
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    Default Parts Washer

    Hi Four_Plus_Two

    It will depend on the solvent you use in the parts washer how well they work.
    I still do it the old fashioned way in a bowl. I use petrol for mineral based oils (engines & gearboxes)and methylated spirits for vegatable based oils (brake parts)
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    1000+ Posts Fordman's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by four_plus_two View Post
    I'm getting sick of spending hours scrubbing brake parts and hubs with degreaser and a toothbrush
    The normal parts washer won't stop you having to scrub the parts with a brush. However, they are a convenient thing to have if you are regularly washing parts, because you can just close the lid and come back next time without messing about with containers of degreaser/solvent. And they usually have a metal grid which drains well from the part. The normal size would be more than adequate for a coil spring or strut.
    It may have an electric pump directing the degreaser on to the part, which is probably the only thing that can go wrong with a cheapie.

    Check how much degreaser is required to fill them up, you may have to put in 20 litres and top up occasionally, and some may be less than others?
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    1000+ Posts schlitzaugen's Avatar
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    I use the cheap biodegradable degreaser which is now I think 1.5$ at the cheap stores. Then I use a high pressure cleaner and water. That way, there is no staining on driveway, etc. The results are much quicker and much better than using a toothbrush.
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  5. #5
    Fellow Frogger! four_plus_two's Avatar
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    Thanks all, yeah I'm in a rental property so need to keep the work area clean.

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    1000+ Posts Pugnut403's Avatar
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    I've got a supercheap one, bought it secondhand for $50 from a bloke moving interstate.
    Never missed a beat.
    Mine's aboout 700 long by 500 wide.
    Took about 30-40 litres to fill, drop a couple of litres in every now and then to top up evap. Keep the lid down it doesn't evaporate much anyhow.
    I use kerosene in mine, works well, doesn't smell too badly, won't give y ou a brain-killing high like petrol will on a hot day.
    Diesel also works. We run diesel in the one at the workshop at work.
    They are a revelation if moving up from the bowl of petrol method...
    Mine has a perforated shelf that sits above fluid level, you sit the item on that and the flexi-hose shoots kero on it, you scrub with a parts washer brush, a stiff bristled solvent proof brush available from tool/auto places for about $5.
    There is an area at the pump end with no shelf, giving the ability to see the fluid level and to dip items in if required.
    Get yourself one and you WILL NOT regret it!
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    Quote Originally Posted by Pugnut403 View Post
    I've got a supercheap one, bought it secondhand for $50 from a bloke moving interstate.
    Never missed a beat.
    Mine's aboout 700 long by 500 wide.
    Took about 30-40 litres to fill, drop a couple of litres in every now and then to top up evap. Keep the lid down it doesn't evaporate much anyhow.
    I use kerosene in mine, works well, doesn't smell too badly, won't give y ou a brain-killing high like petrol will on a hot day.
    Diesel also works. We run diesel in the one at the workshop at work.
    They are a revelation if moving up from the bowl of petrol method...
    Mine has a perforated shelf that sits above fluid level, you sit the item on that and the flexi-hose shoots kero on it, you scrub with a parts washer brush, a stiff bristled solvent proof brush available from tool/auto places for about $5.
    There is an area at the pump end with no shelf, giving the ability to see the fluid level and to dip items in if required.
    Get yourself one and you WILL NOT regret it!
    I agree with that, I've allways toyed with the idea of buying one as they are so good and convenient to use. Encourage a mate who lives closeby to buy one and then use his.. When I was working a lot on cars, they were too damn expensive then, but I get tempted when I see them as cheap as they are now, but then, they do take up room if your garage is crowded (Like mine!!) So the "encourage a mate" option is a better solution!!

    Diesel always seemed to be the solvent of choice, and it really takes the crud off quickly.


    Ken

  8. #8
    1000+ Posts Kim Luck's Avatar
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    Kero is King! The only better solvent is Toluene! Kero air dries but if the parts are high carbon and unplated they will rust quickly unless oiled soon after cleaning.
    Don't it always seem to go that you don't know what you've got 'til it's gone............

  9. #9
    VIP Sponsor richo's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kim Luck View Post
    Kero is King! The only better solvent is Toluene! Kero air dries but if the parts are high carbon and unplated they will rust quickly unless oiled soon after cleaning.
    Kero kills. Toxic fumes. Toluene no different.
    Both need to be used and dsposed of responsibly.

    I personally like the plastic tub type, protects alloy gasket surfaces from damage. Haven't seen one in a decent size though.

    The cheap ones all seem to have noisy pumps/motors, never owned an expensive one to know if they ar any quieter.

    i still use petrol for some particular parts where its use is recommended, if there were an alternative which didn't leave my clothes smelling like the solvent, I'd be into it.

    My two bobs worth.

  10. #10
    Sans Pond. STALLED's Avatar
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    I'd wait until Repco/Supercheap have one of their 20% off weekends - would make for some good buying then!

    We had one at school, with the tub being around 1000mm x 500mm in size. Fits most items, but it could of been deeper - was a bit too shallow, and a fair bit of splashback ensued!
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  11. #11
    Real cars have hydraulics DoubleChevron's Avatar
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    I have one here .... and am quite surprised how little I use it ..... You see the $2.00 export degreaser and pressure washer do a vastly better job of 99.99% of stuff you want to clean (high pressure is brilliant...).

    spend the money on one of the german made baby karcher pressure washers (there about $300 rather than $200 for the chinesse karcher). Make sure it comes with the power nozzle (it's brilliant and bloody deadly, so powerful it will etch concrete!).

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