'Roos and country roads
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  1. #1
    Fellow Frogger!
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    'Roos and country roads

    It seems there are two types of scarers available - the electronic one that emits an ultrasonic squeel, and a simple whistle that uses air flow to create a sound.

    I tried the simple one but I could hear it inside the car and drove me nuts!

    What other experience is out there? Do they work? Are there other devices available? Is anyone in the insurence industry and have stats on roo claims?

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    Cheers,

    <small>[ 21 August 2003, 09:17 AM: Message edited by: Brodie Shields ]</small>
    Cheers,
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  2. #2
    Moderator Alan S's Avatar
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    Brodie Shields:


    What other experience is out there? Do they work? Are there other devices available? Is anyone in the insurence industry and have stats on roo claims?

    Cheers,
    Pump action shotgun works well mallet dance whip

    I saw something recently & the stats are a bit bigger than you might think; they quoted "Collisions with animals" from one insurer alone at 11,000 claims totalling $21 million. They also claimed that the majority of these happened within the claimants own postcode & not on long trips. 2% of these claims were write offs but most claims were under $2000.
    Strangely in the regional town where I live, there were 23 hit last year, a nearby city 22 and the nearest recognized "Rural" area, one, which was when the local copper hit one on his way home from work late one night last December. cry

    Being in your region, I could imagine they would be starting to present a big problem now there's been just enough rain to get them moving.

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  3. #3
    1000+ Posts Rod Hagen's Avatar
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    Don't know the answers to your questions Brodie, but one thing relating to insurance and roos (or other animals) is worth knowing.

    Some companies regard kangaroo hits as events that will wipe out your no claim bonus, even if you clearly could do nothing about the situation, because they can't claim against the " other party". (Yes, roos may have deep "pockets" , but they never keep any money in them )

    My wife found out this the hard way last year when she lost her VACC insurance no claim bonus after a roo jumped onto her bonnet.

    Because of this her current nice red 306Xsi is insured with RACV instead, who regard animal strikes in almost all circumstances as a "no fault" accident and accordingly don't dent your bonus. They gave her back her rating one when she changed to.

    So, if you live in a roo prone area, or do a lot of country driving, its well worth checking out the details with your own insurance company.

    Cheers

    Rod
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  4. #4
    Good Sport danielsydney's Avatar
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    God help me if I hit one in the C3. dead Ill get wiped out i guess.
    What about Plasticky BX owners though with the plasticky bonnet?

  5. #5
    Guru davemcbean's Avatar
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    Rod Hagen:
    So, if you live in a roo prone area, or do a lot of country driving, its well worth checking out the details with your own insurance company.
    I think this goes for almost everybody. Even if you live in the centre of Sydney, you only have to jump on the M5/hume freeway and drive as close as Wilton (10 minutes south of Campbelltown) before roos and wombats can wipe out your car.

    The same goes for most other roads heading out of Sydney, not to mention the national park roads within Sydney.

    The same applies to livestock. In my local area (Camden/Wollondilly, just SW of Sydney) a car crashes into livestock about once a week on average, according to an article published in a local paper this week. This almost happened to my parents and I, a couple of years ago, when a bull almost walked out in front of us. A guy I went to school with wrote off his parents van when he hit a horse. The local police say that poor fences and open gates are a real problem in this area.

    Dave

    <small>[ 21 August 2003, 12:37 PM: Message edited by: davemcbean ]</small>
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  6. #6
    Real cars have hydraulics DoubleChevron's Avatar
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    Hi Danial,

    it's the plastic on the inside of the BX that's the problem. My sister in law tried to climb the gate in our carport when she was p!$$ed one night and fell back onto the BX ... The only time it's alarm has ever been tripped. It must've been a hell of an impact... About 65kgs throwing itself back onto the bonnet eek! eek! She just bounced off. If it had of been the DS21 (parked right beside the BX) that she fell back on, I'd be down one $1000+ dollar alluminium DS bonnet

    If you hit the limit of the bonnets flex it simply breaks (I've seen a BX that's been run up the back of, and the hatch just broke).

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  7. #7
    Gone Fishin' Ray Bell's Avatar
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    One of the questions first posed was about insurance stats on (as I understand the question...) claims with or without the roo-shooing devices.

    I think you'll find there is a discount given to owners of Shu-Roos by some insurance companies, and there are many transport operators (Finnemore's and McCafferty's come to mind) who insist on fitment to their vehicles.

    One assumes they have had some experience and go to this expense because of the potential cost savings in the long run.

    For my part, my Shu-Roo seemed to do a great job for the first 18 months I had it. I never once saw a roo with it turned on.

    Then one night I did hit a little one, but there was a question mark over whether or not the plug was properly in the socket. I was more worried about the lack of radiator than what was going on with the wiring at the time, however...

    After that I kept finding bundles of roos in my path, so I went to Shu-Roo and they established that the speakers were worn out. These were replaced and I ventured out again.

    On a drive from Bathurst to Willow Tree, I saw no fewer than 1000 roos ahead of me, and this with lights that were for some reason very poor at the time.

    I lost confidence in the Shu-Roo, though my initial experience makes me wonder why. I'm asking myself if the real problem over the last year or so has been that there are just so many roos out there so desperate for food that they don't care if a car's coming...

  8. #8
    UFO
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    Having lived in the bush a long time before coming to Wollongong, I have seen many cars with Shu-Roos on them and front end damage from roos. I think at times like this, as Ray suggests, the roos don't give a damn. For example on a recent drive to Cooma, there would have to have been at least one dead roo per km between the Federal Hwy turnoff near Canberra all the way through to Cooma (except of course in the middle of Queanbeyan).

    Around Wollongong and other park surrounded areas we also have to watch out for those bloody Rusa Deer that come out of the Nat Park and surrounding escarpment. Some of the local bleeding hearts every now and then put up signs saying "Don't shoot Bambi" I bet our neighbour who did a coupla grand damage to her Barina wouldn't mind taking a couple of pot shots at "Bambi".

    Only protection I reckon is about a gazillion watts of light and eyeballs on the end of sticks watching out for whatever is in your way. dance
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  9. #9
    Fellow Frogger!
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    Only protection I reckon is about a gazillion watts of light and eyeballs on the end of sticks watching out for whatever is in your way.
    So..... it seems the opinion is the Shu Roo and the whistle are a waste of time considering the present climate where the roos are so hungry they don't give a damn.

    I think I'll take UFOs advice.

    Cheers,
    Cheers,
    Brodie

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  10. #10
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    I'm sure I saw something somewhere where they did proper testing of these type of devices, and discovered that they do not work. Kangaroos behaved exactly the same whether a car was fitted with one or not.

    Don't waste your money.

    Dan.

    PS I've got this rock that keeps tigers away, anyone want to buy it?........ Of course it works, you don't see any tigers about do you? mallet

    <small>[ 22 August 2003, 10:11 AM: Message edited by: FatDan ]</small>
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  11. #11
    Budding Architect ???? pugrambo's Avatar
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    we could re-release dingoes in the problem areas to naturally cull the roos and of course the other benefit is they also rid the country side of feral cats, foxes and rabbits
    as a member of the dingo conservation i know where dingoes have been released back into the bush roos and wallabies are back to normal numbers and the cat, fox, rabbit population is near zero
    but we as a clever mob in this country decided years ago to rid the country of one of the only animals that kept many things at the right level
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  12. #12
    Guru davemcbean's Avatar
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    pugrambo:
    we could re-release dingoes in the problem areas
    Sean,

    It's a pity we don't have any native large meat eaters left (like the thylacine). Despite their reputation, Dingos are not really native (they did not evolve here), but are a breed introduced from asia about 5000 years ago. On the evolutionary time scale, that's not much before all the animals we call "feral" were introduced. The Dingo is thought to be responsible for the extinction of the thylacine on the mainland.

    Even though pure "dingos" are endangered in Australia, according to a documentary on TV they are supposedly still relatively plentiful in their native areas of south east asia, but I must admit I don't know how true this is. You probably know alot more about this than me.

    Don't get me wrong, this doesn't mean I don't like Dingos. I like them alot, but if you ignore sentimental considerations, the Dingo is a feral animal, just like every other land dwelling placental mammal species in Australia.

    You may well be right, reintroducing Dingos in some areas may be useful, but my point is that the only Australian native land dwelling mammals are Marsupials, and we shouldn't lose sight of this fact when we deal with Dingos.

    Rats, cats, dingos, yowies( wink ) all came here from south east Asia, either on boats or by natural rafting on logs, etc. Although maybe the yowies were strong enough to swim .

    "Australian Aboriginal" humans can be called "native" or "indigenous" only because their culture is unique to this continent, not because they are native as a species or sub-species. As we all know, the sub-species to which we all belong (homo sapiens sapiens) came from elsewhere.

    Dave

    <small>[ 22 August 2003, 02:02 PM: Message edited by: davemcbean ]</small>
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  13. #13
    1000+ Posts Rod Hagen's Avatar
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    Kangaroos have always followed a "boom and bust" cycle. Dingoes might take the occasional weak one but they will never have much effect on the overall numbers. In good times roos breed up very quickly. When the hard times come they die in very large numbers, and stop breeding (or , rather, delay giving "birth".)

    Actually, Dave, there were many placental mammals here that dramatically pre-date human arrival here and that deserve the title "native". Many of the ancestors of native rodents seem to have arrived between 5 and 15 million years ago, long before Homo sapiens arrived on the scene. Many current "native" rodents evolved here into new species from these ancestors. So, in the sense that they actually evolved here, they are truly "native" .

    For a while the earliest known of all Australian placental mammals , the Tingamarra, dated from around 55 million years ago.

    Then the Ausktribosphenos nyktos came along. This pushed the date back to around 117 million years (India , for example, was probably still attached to the Australian plate at this time) . This is held to be one of the earliest known true mammal fossils (there is an even earlier one from Madagascar). One interpretation of all this is that placental mammals actually originated in the "south", rather than in the northern hemisphere, and spread out from here before complete separation had occured.

    Cheers

    Rod

    <small>[ 22 August 2003, 03:08 PM: Message edited by: Rod Hagen ]</small>
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  14. #14
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    It's a pity we don't have any native large meat eaters left (like the thylacine).
    Dave
    Or the Thylacoleo Carniflex. Sure am glad that ones extinct. Imagine a giant extremely angry meat eating koala type creature about the size of a lion. These things had the most specialized meat eating teeth that science has ever seen. just like razors that slice chunks out of you. I think thats where the legend of the 'drop bears'comes from. They supposedly went extinct about 20,000 years ago, but there have been reports over the years of creatures that fit the description in various parts of Oz. it has been suggested that some of the so called 'big cat' sightings may actually be this thing.

    But gee wouldn't they keep the feral/bushwalker population down!

    Dan.

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  15. #15
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  16. #16
    Guru davemcbean's Avatar
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    FatDan:
    [Or the Thylacoleo Carniflex. Sure am glad that ones extinct. They supposedly went extinct about 20,000 years ago, but there have been reports over the years of creatures that fit the description in various parts of Oz. it has been suggested that some of the so called 'big cat' sightings may actually be this thing..
    Yeah, I know, this website has always been an interesting one:

    <a href="http://www.thylacoleo.com/" target="_blank">http://www.thylacoleo.com/</a>

    Regards,
    Dave
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  17. #17
    Guru davemcbean's Avatar
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    Rod Hagen:
    Actually, Dave, there were many placental mammals here that dramatically pre-date human arrival here and that deserve the title "native". Many of the ancestors of native rodents seem to have arrived between 5 and 15 million years ago, long before Homo sapiens arrived on the scene. Many current "native" rodents evolved here into new species from these ancestors. So, in the sense that they actually evolved here, they are truly "native" .

    For a while the earliest known of all Australian placental mammals , the Tingamarra, dated from around 55 million years ago.

    Then the Ausktribosphenos nyktos came along. This pushed the date back to around 117 million years (India , for example, was probably still attached to the Australian plate at this time) . This is held to be one of the earliest known true mammal fossils (there is an even earlier one from Madagascar). One interpretation of all this is that placental mammals actually originated in the "south", rather than in the northern hemisphere, and spread out from here before complete separation had occured.
    I stand corrected. Thanks Rod! Very interesting indeed, although the Dingo certainly didn't evolve here, unless we focus on tiny changes within the level of a sub-species, much like focusing on the minute differences between "races" of humans.

    Regards,
    Dave

    <small>[ 22 August 2003, 03:39 PM: Message edited by: davemcbean ]</small>
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  18. #18
    1000+ Posts Rod Hagen's Avatar
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    Yep, dingos arrived barely yesterday. Fundamentally the same beast as similar characters found in Myanmar, Southeast China, Laos, Malaysia, Thailand, Indonesia, Borneo, the Philippines and New Guinea. Even has the same scientific name these days.

    You might be interested in a few thoughts I penned about this and some related issues a few yeasr back - <a href="http://rodhagen.customer.netspace.net.au/Aborigines,Wilderness.html" target="_blank">http://rodhagen.customer.netspace.net.au/Aborigines,Wilderness.html</a>

    Cheers

    Rod

    <small>[ 22 August 2003, 04:48 PM: Message edited by: Rod Hagen ]</small>
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  19. #19
    Budding Architect ???? pugrambo's Avatar
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    Rod Hagen:
    Yep, dingos arrived barely yesterday. Fundamentally the same beast as similar characters found in Myanmar, Southeast China, Laos, Malaysia, Thailand, Indonesia, Borneo, the Philippines and New Guinea. Even has the same scientific name these days.

    Cheers

    Rod
    basically the Thai dog is the same as the dingo
    the dingo arrived in this country closer to 10 000 years ago from the boat people from countries like thailand
    the way they found this is that there is a mite that lives on kangaroos that they is not native to australia but is found in thailand
    even though the dingo may not be native to this country in the way that roos and such are they have been here long wnough to have shaped the country as the aboriginals did
    the dingo (canis familiaris) bieng the oldest "dog" in the world is such that all dogs have a little bit of dingo somewhere in them
    to find out more i have links from my web site to a couple of dingo sites including probably the last of the alpine dingoes left in the country thanks to bruce jacobs
    i have over the years had 5 dingoes and if i had a couple of acres i would dearly love a couple of alpines running around
    as it is now i have just the one white dessert dingo
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  20. #20
    1000+ Posts Rod Hagen's Avatar
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    There is a lot debate about the length of time dingoes have been here. Some say as long as 8000 years, but the oldest fossil found checks out at about 3,500 years, and the oldest known Aboriginal cave art depicting them is about the same.

    The oldest "dog" fossils date back to around 14000 BP (from Europe from memory ) . But a lot depends on what you call a "dog", rather than a "wolf." If you include other members of the "Canidae", like jackals, you get back to around 1.7 million years.

    Cheers

    Rod
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  21. #21
    Budding Architect ???? pugrambo's Avatar
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    Rod

    true
    the thing is dingoes never originated from the wolf as most are lead to believe
    they actually have a DNA strand from would you believe a leopard
    this is why they have retractable claws and independant ears not unlike a cat
    the closest breed to a dingo is the basenji as they are in the spitz breed category
    just about every DNA sample from just about every dog in the world can be found at the SA uni where the study has been going on for a number of years
    the dingo in it's form is also the most original form as all other dog breeds over the years have changed
    if you ever get a chance to run into bruce jacobs he is a wealth of information
    most of us dingo co habitors as you never really ever own a dingo are quite common around the place but even so the general public never really knows what is around their corner
    we are quite lucky in NSW that we don't have to have a permit to have a dingo and are registered at the local council under the companion animals act
    but most breeders are very particular as to who they will sell or give a pup to as we in the conservation are trying out utmost to prevent interbreeding with other dog breeds
    last count there were around 300 real dingoes left in the wild and basically no alpines
    there are many more in captivity than there are left in the wild
    as a final note i would like to add that with as many different breeds of dogs i have ever spent time with or been around i wouldn't own any other breed of dog
    most of the time you wouldn't even know she was here
    and yes the dingo was here before the two youngest kids which are now 18months and 8 weeks old
    the dingo even has stood between a stranger and our 8 week old baby to prevent the stranger from getting any closer
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