Better option than additives?
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  1. #1
    Moderator Alan S's Avatar
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    Better option than additives?

    Here's an idea from the US which I have seen promoted as a better option than engine oil additives given that it is based on the same premise; (ie) lubricant on the moving surfaces prior to starting the engine.
    Anyone ever seen this sytem or alternatively, what do you think?
    My view is that it would be ideal for the car that does a lot of stop/start short trips but possibly of dubious value for anyone doing megamiles, particularly when you look at the price which I suppose isn't all that bad by todays standards.

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    Alan S
    If it ain't broke, use a 12" shifter.....that usually does the trick!!

  2. #2
    Gone Fishin' Ray Bell's Avatar
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    Interesting gadget, but I think the premise is a bit exaggerated... at least...

    Maybe if you floor the throttle every time you fire up it might help... but who would do that?

    I generally have oil pressure within a second or two after firing, though sometimes the TI engine is hard to start and we have the oil light off before it fires.

    There's always oil in the bearings. Not under pressure, sure, but the pressure builds quickly and if you aren't putting the engine under immediate load you'll have pressure before it's needed.

    'Dry bearing abrasion' doesn't seem to be evident in newish engines I've pulled down. And if it was, I'd expect that it would be cumulative and damage bearings in just a few months.

    By the way, a similar device exists to overcome oil surge... the pressure relief valve puts surplus oil into a tank which has a huge spring behind a diaphragm. If oil pressure drops, the tank pumps its reserve supply into the system.

    Garry Willmington used to use this... I think it's a regular item on some Speedway cars.

  3. #3
    1000+ Posts Rod Hagen's Avatar
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    Alan S:

    My view is that it would be ideal for the car that does a lot of stop/start short trips but possibly of dubious value for anyone doing megamiles, particularly when you look at the price which I suppose isn't all that bad by todays standards.

    Alan S
    Might have been a good thing in the fifties and sixties, but these days its a bit unnecessary isn't it? My 505 sLi doesn't use any oil at all between services despite a quatrer of a million on the clock. As long as a modern engine has been designed and built properly in most cases the rest of the car will probably fall apart before the rings and bearings die, if its serviced properly.

    Cheers

    Rod
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  4. #4
    Fellow Frogger!
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    oil pressure???

    Yes that is a big factor, but so too is OIL FILM STRENGTH.
    If you still use shvt oil, you will still get engine wear... deal

    also there are more pieces that can wear out if you connect the auto lube, which can result in a total loss of oil...
    Dunno, that just my view.

    Some engines may react bad to higher oil pressure.. Lots of variables.
    Peugeot
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  5. #5
    Moderator Alan S's Avatar
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    Depends a lot on the engine design I think myself.
    I've always been told to keep the oil as light as possible in a 16V due to the distances & the route it has to travel on cold start up. The very early V6 XMs had a reputation for grinding lobes off cams due to oil starvation on cold starts so presumably it would be those type of situations they were made for...as they say, if you're ino oil additives & the snake oil stories they sell them with, then this should be a safer option.

    Alan S
    If it ain't broke, use a 12" shifter.....that usually does the trick!!

  6. #6
    Gone Fishin' Ray Bell's Avatar
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    Cam lobes are a different matter... especially in OHC engines with rockers running directly on the cam.

    But a little pressure isn't going to get a lot of oil into them in a hurry, only a tad quicker than on a regular startup.

    That's where you really need that film strength and viscosity.

    The XN engines have their cam run in a total bath at all times, by the way. Excellent until you get some water down a follower bore taking off a head...

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