Breaking in a car?
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  1. #1
    who? when? huh? GTI124's Avatar
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    Breaking in a car?

    Had two friends buy Pugs recently, one a 307 1.6 Auto (4 month wait and they still got the wrong colour!) and a 206 1.6 Manual.

    Now Peugeot say they don't need to be broken in, but Deka had to keep the C3 1.4 under 4500rpm, so what's the story?

    What are your thoughts on breaking in a car? From what I've heard it's not good to do highway driving at constant revs. Don't go too close to red line in the first 1500 kms...

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  2. #2
    1000+ Posts dino's Avatar
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    do they have learning computers???i d drive them hard right from thee start...that way the motor beds and settles in nicely and the ecu should be up to par as well...BUT THAN AGAIN i ve never bought and owned a NEW car so my advice should be taken with a BAG of salt....on a serious note.,,..i didn t think modern engines needed to be run in, maybe take it nice n slow for the first K but after that i d certinly give it some....

    cheers
    dino

    if i stopped posting i m sure i d get more work done....

  3. #3
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    Lincoln,

    I think the basic idea is to drive the engine as you normally would, but don't thrash it - ie don't take it on an AF drive day and expect to be anywhere other than last in the pack!! The C3 manual suggested 'a maximum of two thirds of maximum engine revs' for the first 1500-2500km which was why I wasn't going over 4500rpm on that AF drive day.

    The interesting thing is, it's taken at least 5000km, if not 8000km for the C3 engine to 'loosen up' - it has significantly more power now that it did have, especially pulling up hills in 5th on the highway. Yes - our C3's done 8000km already and we've only had it 3 months. Shows what a great highway cruiser it is!

    My sister's Clio took around 5000km to develop some real get-up and go she said too.

    You're right about the running at contant revs on the highway - with tiptronic auto that's easy, change between 3rd and 4th every now and again

    All that being said, our Renault 16TS engine went for 400 000 miles and was never pulled down. What was its run-in? A drive from Mildura to Sydney foot flat to the floor across the Hay Plains and to Sydney via West Wyalong. My dad said that car was amazing, and never caused any problems.

    Congrats on encouraging the Pug purchases!!

    Derek.

    <small>[ 02 April 2003, 03:34 PM: Message edited by: DeKa ]</small>

  4. #4
    1000+ Posts brenno's Avatar
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    I dunno, but if a manufacturer is willing to put their reputation on the line and say their engines don't require running in.....I would tend to beleive them.

    No running in was observed with my car as per manufacturer and dealer recommendations.

    Suited me fine.... wink

  5. #5
    who? when? huh? GTI124's Avatar
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    DeKa:
    I think the basic idea is to drive the engine as you normally would, but don't thrash it
    Ummm...you know how I drive, don't you? Normal driving normally involves a thrashing or two...or five per day. hehe. No, I'm not that hard on the car.

    My Golf GTI took 15000kms for it to really come on song. My Nissan took 5000kms or so.

    What about first service, when does that happen? Peugeot are telling my friend they don't need to see it until 10000kms. That's a long time for that oil and filter on a new engine. I would be more comfortable with a 5000km change...

    Thanks for the reponse, more?
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  6. #6
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    Well, with the C3, first oil change is listed as at 10 000km. Continental Cars suggested that given you *must* take the car in at 2000km for a 'warranty check' (but no oil change specified) that we might as well change the oil.

    I would be inclined to do the same. I mean oil's cheap!

    Derek.

  7. #7
    Fellow Frogger! MYT205's Avatar
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    I've owned a few new cars and rebuilt engines before. Every time I've given the car "some" beltings here and there, but not all the time. Basically I've driven it like normal without babying it.

    Each time the engine has loosened up and gone very well and I've never had a problem.

    On the other hand another car that I know that was bought new and driven by a lady driver, who didn't ever really drive it hard, always seemed tight, and didn't seem to ever loosen up. The car that is. mallet

    Drive it like you stole it from day one..... head_ban

    Darren

  8. #8
    who? when? huh? GTI124's Avatar
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    thinking about it some more, I think I did 15000kms in the Golf before it's first service. I obviously didn't care about it too much..it was back in the shop enough under warranty.

    Did they use the regular oil or the first fill oil at your 2000km check up? These two oils are normally different.
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  9. #9
    who? when? huh? GTI124's Avatar
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    Darren, same thing with Tonia's Micra, took to over 20000kms for it to loosen up. The first owner drove it slow, so it took a long time to undo that damage
    - Lincoln

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  10. #10
    nJm
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    Yep, my 505 was driven gently its whole life by its previous owners (elderly couple in the country), so I found after a few months of me driving it (eg I actually rev it higher than 3000rpm ) it actually loosen up. I think that is pretty funny, didn't get 'run in' so to speak until 255,000kms roll_lau

    <small>[ 02 April 2003, 04:15 PM: Message edited by: nJm ]</small>
    Nick
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    "All of its cars from the 1.1 litre 205 through the ugly duckling 309 to the 2.2 litre 505 GTi had a rightness and a righteousness about them that turned every humdrum drive into a journey. Someone, I once wrote, in the bowels of Peugeot understands handling and how a chassis should feel." - Jeremy Clarkson

  11. #11
    1000+ Posts CHRI'S16's Avatar
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    mmm.. i was brought up thinking that engines need to be driven to no more than 50% revs i the first 5000 k's.
    I always thougt it was to bed bearins and crank, piston sleeves and rings.etc., but when my neighbours bought a brand new e-class they were told to drive it like normal...
    As for my mates 206 GTi, first 1000k's, dealer suggested strongly to go easy on the revs and no flat changing of the g/box and wear in pads etc..
    If i did buy a new car, id be such a punz on the first 5000k;s id change the oil and filter every 1500'k;s and do every lube thing there is to do, just coz i'd wanna baby it as mine...
    ON another note, can't belive that peugeot got the wrong colour after a 4 month wait........ no happy jan!.
    cheers
    Xq
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  12. #12
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    Xq,
    You're definately right about bedding in the brake pads etc - which goes hand in hand with treating the engine nicely, cos well, if you're thrashing the engine you're probably caining the brakes to pull the car up right?

    By the way Lincoln...

    don't you run in a car not break it in? Breaking in is for horses...

    Unless you use whips on the car? whistle

    Derek

  13. #13
    who? when? huh? GTI124's Avatar
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    I repeat, have you seen me drive? hehe, whips and all, baby!

    Yeah, well, breaking in, running in, all of that, same thing.

    Curious as to what the difference between the first fill of oil and normal oil is, though. Changing earlier than 10000km could be problem if you go to a thinner oil than the first fill.
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  14. #14
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    As far as I know the oil was the same?

    I have heard a rumor that Peugeot (and I'd assume Citroen) engines are run in on the bench now, which is why they don't specify run-in driving methods? This was from a customer at work, so I don't know if there's any truth in it.

    And yes, I've seen you drive

    Derek.

  15. #15
    Fellow Frogger! jfn180's Avatar
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    well went my dad got the new vx holden 6moths ago they said go easy on for the first 1500kms and go light on the breaks
    97`black 306 style sold JFN 306
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  16. #16
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    whip

  17. #17
    Sense Pug307's Avatar
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    What colour 307 did they get? Supply of the 1.6s isn't too bad now.

    In regards to breaking in - get the engine warmed up, find a hill (puts it under load), then drive. Don't spend your time bouncing it off the redlimiter (not possible anyway), but don't pussyfoot it either. It's good to go up and down hills with a few revs onboard.

    There's nothing wrong with a good rev. I found that the run in process took place much faster when I started to drive the car harder. I don't see any real reason why you should pussy foot it.

    Also - don't keep the same revs for long periods, vary the revs when cruising.

    Peugeot 307 XS 1.6
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  18. #18
    Gone Fishin' Ray Bell's Avatar
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    I think the main thing is never to labour the engine, and not to rev it too hard till it's had a chance to bed in... maybe 1000kms.

  19. #19
    who? when? huh? GTI124's Avatar
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    Justin, he ordered a black 1.6 Auto with a sunroof. They got him a silver one.
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  20. #20
    1000+ Posts Warwick's Avatar
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    Not much I agree with Ray on, except I don't think it's good to load up(labour) a new engine too much. I have worked in the car business for 15 years, and have therefore RUN-IN hundreds of demo's. This is what I think: Never nurse it. First few hundred km's are the most important. Rev it plenty (5000- 5500 is fine)and use a fair amount of accelerator. i.e. Dont accelerate too slowly. Change gears lots more than necessary(up and down). Vary things, but dont pussyfoot around. Dont thrash it, but dont nurse it either. Err more on the thrashing side. But warm it up a bit first. The Alfa selespeed is a good example. Take it too easy and the gearchange quality later on becomes lousy. Give it(moderate) heaps. You need to bed in clutch, wheel bearings, gearbox, brakes and engine. So give it a bit of everything.
    "Now my dream lies shattered like the shards of a broken dream"

  21. #21
    Sense Pug307's Avatar
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    I agree with Warwick! Our Volvo dealer actually told us that the test drive cars drive a lot better than customers' cars in many cases, as they actually have been driven, not pussyfooted around.

    Couldn't they find him a black one at all? The problem with the black in the 307 is that it doesn't look that black - Onyx Black in the 206 looks much better, Obsidian Black in teh 307 doesn't have that jet black look (and heck, you pay more because its metallic).

    1.6 autos are very relaxed. Driving a 206XR 1.4 auto for the day yesterday, I found the 1.4 felt quite zippy, actually zippier than the 307 1.6. On the basis of numbers it's slower, but it just feels faster - that cable throttle must help, vs the dozy throttle by wire in the 307. Perhaps it feels that way as the 206 is lower to the ground, and nosier than the 307.

    The 206 was fun to drive - I think the gearbox and transmission mate very well actually. Still, I have no idea what writers are going on about when they say the 206's ride is class leading - handling is nice, but really, I think you're engaging in self delusion if you really think it rides that well.

    Peugeot 307 XS 1.6
    Aussiefrogged in MEL, PER, SYD, BNE & ADL.
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  22. #22
    Moderator Alan S's Avatar
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    I was told by a mechanic who specialised in long distance semis that he always advised hoe drivers when they collected a truck after a rebuild that "revs won't kill'em but load will" and used to put a mark on the tacho & tell the drivers not to let the engine revs drop below that mark at any stage.
    He reckoned his engines, run in properly were 'million milers.'

    Keeping that in mind, here's a link to a guy who claims to be giving away the ultimate secret to running an engine in who by his own admission declares it cotroversial.

    This should be good for at least 50 postings. mallet dance mallet whip

    <a href="http://www.mototuneusa.com/break_in_secrets.htm" target="_blank">http://www.mototuneusa.com/break_in_secrets.htm</a>

    Alan S 2_cents
    If it ain't broke, use a 12" shifter.....that usually does the trick!!

  23. #23
    Too many posts! JohnW's Avatar
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    Alan S:
    I was told by a mechanic who specialised in long distance semis that he always advised hoe drivers when they collected a truck after a rebuild that "revs won't kill'em but load will" and used to put a mark on the tacho & tell the drivers not to let the engine revs drop below that mark at any stage.

    Alan S 2_cents
    That's my recipe too and advise from many who know and knew more than I do. Just don't thrash it and don't lug it. Revs are fine but load at low revs .......

    JohnW
    JohnW

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