Engaged/Disengaged
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  1. #1
    Fellow Frogger!
    Join Date
    Apr 2001
    Location
    NJ, USA
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    143

    Engaged/Disengaged

    I always thought the clutch was engaged when it was pushed in, now someone tells me it's the opposite. It's engaged when it's out and disengaged when its pushed in. Which is true?

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  2. #2
    Fellow Frogger!
    Join Date
    Mar 2001
    Location
    Brisbane, QLD, Australia
    Posts
    396
    The latter.

    You push the clutch pedal in to disengage, and let it out to engage.

  3. #3
    Guru davemcbean's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2001
    Location
    Camden NSW & Selwyn NZ
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    2,334
    Chipper is 100% correct.

    Engage has a similar meaning as "to join" or "connect" or "couple". Since the gearbox motion is only joined/connected/coupled to the engine motion when the pedal is up, the clutch is only engaged when the pedal is up.

    Interestingly in northern Europe the clutch is refered to as the "coupling". This makes sense as "couple" and "clutch" can be synonomous as can "declutch" and "decouple". It's a bit like saying "Kompressor" instead of "supercharger" or "blower". Technical words in other languages are usually the easiest to translate as they are usually always based on the same Latin or Greek ancestral word. Sometimes you just have to think a bit laterally (and phonetically).

    Dave


    <font face="Verdana, Arial" size="2">Originally posted by Chipper:
    The latter.

    You push the clutch pedal in to disengage, and let it out to engage.
    NZ Fleet
    1976 504 Ti
    1984 205 GT twin carb
    1991 205 SI 1.6GTI motor
    1994 106 Xsi
    1996 Mondeo V6
    Aus Fleet
    1955 203C
    1997 Civic Cxi (great allrounder- revy, flexible, nimble, comfortable , economical, simple and durable )

  4. #4
    Guru davemcbean's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2001
    Location
    Camden NSW & Selwyn NZ
    Posts
    2,334
    Chipper is 100% correct.

    Engage has a similar meaning as "to join" or "connect" or "couple". Since the gearbox motion is only joined/connected/coupled to the engine motion when the pedal is up, the clutch is only engaged when the pedal is up.

    Interestingly in northern Europe the clutch is refered to as the "coupling". This makes sense as "couple" and "clutch" can be synonomous as can "declutch" and "decouple". It's a bit like saying "Kompressor" instead of "supercharger" or "blower". Technical words in other languages are usually the easiest to translate as they are usually always based on the same Latin or Greek ancestral word. Sometimes you just have to think a bit laterally (and phonetically).

    Dave


    <font face="Verdana, Arial" size="2">Originally posted by Chipper:
    The latter.

    You push the clutch pedal in to disengage, and let it out to engage.
    NZ Fleet
    1976 504 Ti
    1984 205 GT twin carb
    1991 205 SI 1.6GTI motor
    1994 106 Xsi
    1996 Mondeo V6
    Aus Fleet
    1955 203C
    1997 Civic Cxi (great allrounder- revy, flexible, nimble, comfortable , economical, simple and durable )

  5. #5
    Guru davemcbean's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2001
    Location
    Camden NSW & Selwyn NZ
    Posts
    2,334
    It's pretty easy to forget the real meaning of words. For instance we don't often think about the fact that "Car" is short for "Carriage" and a Carriage is something which is used to "Carry" things. I went through most of my life without ever thinking about that connection.
    Also we can get used to there being 2 or more names for one thing, and sometimes forget that one name is an abbreviation of another. For years I thought of the terms "con rod" and "connecting rod" as being like "spanner" and "wrench" or "motor" and "engine" and never really thought about the fact that "con" is obviously short for "connecting". The connections are so obvious that when you first think about it you wonder why it never occured to you to think about it before. We tend to just use words without thinking of their true meaning much (especially when we're mono-lingual). They say that many people don't really develop a talent for language until well after they reach adulthood. I know when I reached about 25 I started thinking about language construction alot more. I wish I'd done this when I was trying to learn French at school at the age of 14. The fact that the NSW school system doesn't teach us much about our own language makes it hard. They haven't taught the English language at NSW schools for 30 years or more. What they call "English" class is actually "literature and poetry" and we're apparently supposed to learn by example. Unfortunately as my previous examples pointed out we can often learn to use a language without actually fully understanding what we are saying. This fact never occured to whoever created the NSW English curriculum. My HSC results said it all, my English mark was 63 which was 21 marks lower than my lowest other mark. I can't count the number of people who have told me that they had a similar discrepancy in their marks.

    Sorry for the long post.

    Dave
    NZ Fleet
    1976 504 Ti
    1984 205 GT twin carb
    1991 205 SI 1.6GTI motor
    1994 106 Xsi
    1996 Mondeo V6
    Aus Fleet
    1955 203C
    1997 Civic Cxi (great allrounder- revy, flexible, nimble, comfortable , economical, simple and durable )

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