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  1. #1
    Fellow Frogger!
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    Newbie to wines...

    Ok I may not kow much about oils and I certainly know less when it comes to wines...

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    I know that in general you drinks reds at room temp, but you drink whites chilled right?

    So do I store whites in the fridge? Or just chill them before drinking? cheers!

    Thanks

  2. #2
    Moderator Alan S's Avatar
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    After the 4th glass, does it matter? dance roll_lau dance head_ban mallet

    Alan S (My second passion) a_drink
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  3. #3
    Budding Architect ???? pugrambo's Avatar
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    out 'ere in the bush we also chill tha port as well
    i think rose you chill
    red is room temp
    white generally chilled about an hour before drinking or decanting ready for serving
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  4. #4
    Fellow Frogger! nchandler's Avatar
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    I'll have a beer thanks. a_drink head_ban

    Nick

  5. #5
    1000+ Posts CHRI'S16's Avatar
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    also as general rule, open both bottles about 15-30 min before drinking, to let some breathing occur.
    With the white once chilled try to keep it as such, ie in some ice/bucket etc.
    Also don't confuse desert wines over normal more tastefull whites.
    With reds 88 and 98 are very good years in aussie wines, spesh south aus.
    Try an aim for a red atleat 2 years or older. other wise a too young wine could leave a bitter after taste.

    Before buying decide on what will yo b eating with the wine. Ask the man behind the counter wha he recommends for your meal.
    If your are treating a young lady then ask for a dessert wine, chicks love the sweet taste.
    cheers - chris

    ps personal favs are 88 Penfolds Noir.
    Wolf Blass 2002 chardonay and Brown Brothers desert for the chickies, but above all a stiff shot of Jonny Blue

    <small>[ 12 September 2003, 10:50 PM: Message edited by: CHRI'S16 ]</small>
    ... ptui!

  6. #6
    nJm
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    I like the Orlando St Hugo Cab Sav from Coonawarra. A very nice drop, it was either a 98 or 99. I think it is around the $32 mark at the moment.
    Nick
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  7. #7
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    My passion too, Alan!

    Nick, probably '99, without trying to sound like a pretentious git, '99 was supposedly really good, climate wise, for Coonawarra reds.

    Hey Chris, be careful, if your chickie knows anything, she'll laugh at you for choosing dessert wine! Except if it's with your ice cream.

    Interesting this should come up today. The missus and I were 'forced' into drinking an '85 Penfolds Bin 389 last night that we'd tucked away and forgotten about, as we had expert advice that it'd probably be past its best. This stuff is made in the barrels that Grange Hermitage has just been taken out of, and is referred to as the 'poor man's Grange'. Anyway, it was bloody fantastic, edging on to almost a fortified aftertaste and a tawny colour, and I'm sick now that we didn't keep it for a special occasion... Ahhhh...'Poor man's Grange', and Aussie rules on the telly...brilliant!

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  8. #8
    1000+ Posts Pugnut403's Avatar
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    I like a nice Tasmanian or South Australian Shiraz or Cabernet Sauvignon. Yum!
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  9. #9
    Fellow Frogger!
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    Don't serve your reds at room temperature if it's a stinking hot day. Here's a general guide:

    •Straight out of the fridge it's too cold and without flavour
    •Whites 10 to 14 deg, use an ice bucket with slushy water or an ice jacket
    •Reds 14 to 18 deg – in the fridge for 15 minutes, then keep the bottle in a cooler (not ice bucket). Above 21 alcohol boils off spoiling the flavour.

    Cheers, a_drink
    Cheers,
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  10. #10
    Fellow Frogger! frogs4ever's Avatar
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    rc968:

    So do I store whites in the fridge? Or just chill them before drinking?
    Two cents worth from the reigning Tasmanian Wine Options champion:

    RC968, whites should be stored in the same conditions as reds, but serving temperature should be varied depending on the style of wine - more on this later.

    Both red and white wines should be stored in the same way. An ideal cellar is dark, not to dry and not too damp, has a stable temperature idealy around 12 degrees, but anywhere from 10 degrees to 18 degrees is fine, provided there is not much variation over the twenty four hour cycle. The storage area must be well away from bright natural light.

    It is widely known that most full bodied reds benefit from cellaring. But some whites also improve in the cellar. Top notch Rieslings from Tassie, Eden Valley, Clare Valley, Great Southern W.A. etc can improve in the bottle over many years. Likewise for good Semillon from Hunter Valley, Margaret River, Barossa/Eden.

    There is a lot of debate over correct serving temperatures. It is usually said that reds should be served at room temperature - but than can mean anything depending on whether you live in a tin shed in the south west of Tassie in winter or a tin shed in the red centre in summer. For most reds, around 18 to 20 degrees is good. Too cool will dull the flavour and accentuate the acids and tannins, whereas too warm will make the wine taste 'hot' (alcohol) and flabby. Lighter bodied reds such as Beaujolais and cheap Chianti can be served a little cooler.

    White wines should served cool, but how cool depends on the style. Desert wines should be served pretty cold (a few hours in the fridge). Rieslings and other aromatic whites also show off thier fresh, invigorating, character best when they are fairly cool, typically about an hour in the fridge is good. For most wooded Chardonnays, about half an hour in the fridge is adequate. Their rich, complex flavour retreats when too cold. Same for good Semillon. If you are lucky enough to have a nice cool underground cellar, most Chardonnays and Semillons will be perfect served straight from your cellar, with no further chilling required.

    For whites and reds, a dish of luke warm water is useful if you need to warm up a bottle quickly, while a short stint in the freezer wrapped in wet towel will quickly cool a bottle if you are realy short of time. A bucket of icy water works will to of course.

    Putting a red wine in the fridge will not harm it in any way, but the maturation process will be temporarily halted while it is this cool. Just make sure you get it back up to a sensible serving temperature before drinking. In contrast, excessive heat will eventually ruin any wine. You can 'store' your whites and reds in a fridge if you really want to, but remember that the maturation process will be on hold when the wine is this cold. No damage will be done though.

    If I open a bottle of red but don't finish it before bed time, I usually put the cork back in and stick it in the fridge. It will keep well in the fridge for 2 to 3 days, but as I suggested before, stick the bottle in a tub of luke warm water to bring it back up to 'room temperature' before serving. This system will not damage the wine in any way. In fact, with young, full bodied reds, they are often better on the 2nd or even 3rd night.

    Some of my favourite wine styles:

    Tamar Valley Cabernets (especially Moorilla from 1997 onwards)
    Great Southern (W.A.) Rieslings
    Coonawarra Shiraz
    Australian Tokay
    Australian or Portugese vintage port
    whites from the Alsace region of France.

    Good recent vintages in South Eastern Australia:

    1991 (good)
    1994 (best - some amazing wines from S.A.)
    1996 (good)
    1998 (very good but a little over-hyped)
    1999 (underated)

    Revisited a couple of 1994's recently - a Wynns black label Cabernet Sauvignon and a Leasingham Bin 61 Shiraz. Both were fantastic.

    I like this stuff to: a_drink
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  11. #11
    Fellow Frogger!
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    Wow..soo much info...I love this forum

    Looks like I will have to do some deeper reading if I want to know more.

    But what seems to be more interesting is which alcoholic drinks goes well with chicks.... whip mallet

  12. #12
    Good Sport danielsydney's Avatar
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    I personally love a french wine called "bougalais village".
    It is from the far north west of France and has a great taste aparently.
    My brother also came back from Kuala Lumpur and said the french wine over there was crap and tasted like cats piss.
    The ones here are great though, the above one is my favourite Red.

  13. #13
    Fellow Frogger! MYT205's Avatar
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    I love Margaret River whites.

    I am yet to find one that I don't like.

    Fifth Leg is my absolute favourite. a_drink

  14. #14
    Fellow Frogger!
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    For those who like chardonay with a little oak, I would recommend a Montana Reserve Gisborne Chardonay. I know Dan Murphys have it for around $20, and I have seen it at Vintage Cellars too

  15. #15
    Cal
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    frogs4ever, thank you very much for that informative run down on Aussie wines. I also love wine, but need to learn a lot more about them. That was a good start.

    Cheers,

    Cal. cheers! (with wine glasses instead of beer)
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  16. #16
    Fellow Frogger! frogs4ever's Avatar
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    Cal:
    frogs4ever, thank you very much for that informative run down on Aussie wines. I also love wine, but need to learn a lot more about them. That was a good start.

    Cheers,

    Cal. cheers! (with wine glasses instead of beer)
    Hi Cal,

    There are lots of good books out there to help you get started. But there is a lot of wank and hype in the world of wine, so you need to have your bullshit detectors switched on when reading about wine or listenning to the loudest wine snob at a dinner party.

    Here's a couple of general tips which will set you on the road to years of enjoyment and discovery:

    * Never drink the same wine twice;

    * Take all wine reviews in the press with a grain of salt. I personally know several wine writers and wine makers, and I can assure you that very ofen their palates are nothing special;

    * Never drink wine within an hour or two of cleaning your teeth (toothpaste makes any wine taste like battery acid);

    * Don't waste money on a fine red wine to drink with curry. Basic fruity whites are usually best with hot/spicy food. There are exceptions to this, but wait until you've got a lot more experience before trying them.

    * There are plently of clean, well made wines under $10 a bottle, but very few really interesting wines at this price;

    * Don't waste time driving from shop to shop looking for a particular wine that you may have tasted with a friend or read about in the press. Instead, just go to the best bottle shop in your area, find the most wine-experienced staff member on duty and ask for his or her advice, and don't forget to tell them what you will be drinking the wine with;

    * Most budjet wines are designed to be consumed within 12 months of purchase;

    * Contrary to popular misconception, most Rieslings are not sweet;

    * Grape varieties that are somewhat out of fashion, like Riesling and Cabernet usually offer you a better wine at a given price point than more popular varieties like Chardonnay, Sauv Blanc and Shiraz. This is because supply and demand has a bigger influence on pricing than quality;

    * The levels of preservatives in wine are far lower than you will find in many a fresh orange juice from a supermarket, or dried fruits. And the preservatives in wine are a lot safer than those found many food products;

    * Nine times out of ten the hangover you get from drinking a bottle or two of wine is caused by the ALCOHOL, and the natural grape tannins in the case of full bodied reds.



    <small>[ 16 September 2003, 01:26 PM: Message edited by: frogs4ever ]</small>
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  17. #17
    Cal
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    frogs4ever:
    Some of my favourite wine styles:

    Tamar Valley Cabernets (especially Moorilla from 1997 onwards)
    Great Southern (W.A.) Rieslings
    Coonawarra Shiraz
    Australian Tokay
    Australian or Portugese vintage port
    whites from the Alsace region of France.

    Good recent vintages in South Eastern Australia:

    1991 (good)
    1994 (best - some amazing wines from S.A.)
    1996 (good)
    1998 (very good but a little over-hyped)
    1999 (underated)

    Revisited a couple of 1994's recently - a Wynns black label Cabernet Sauvignon and a Leasingham Bin 61 Shiraz. Both were fantastic.

    I like this stuff to: a_drink
    Do you think you might be able to specify some more brands and particular favourites like the two you mention above. To be honest, I rarely spend more than $20 on a bottle on wine, so under or around that part of the market would be awesome. I enjoy whites and reds equally, depending on mood, food, time of day/night ect.

    Thank you again for even more information.

    Cal.
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  18. #18
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    Contrary to popular misconception, most Rieslings are not sweet;

    * Grape varieties that are somewhat out of fashion, like Riesling and Cabernet usually offer you a better wine at a given price point than more popular varieties like Chardonnay, Sauv Blanc and Shiraz. This is because supply and demand has a bigger influence on pricing than quality;
    Really good point - I prefer Riesling to the other trendier whites anyway. I regularly recommend that people try Rieslings over Chardonnay (which is usually slightly fruitier). Riesling seems to have a cheap and nasty reputation from when the 5 litre Coolabah cask was the big seller. In reality, a good variety.

    Stuey


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  19. #19
    1000+ Posts CHRI'S16's Avatar
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    Stuey:
    Hey Chris, be careful, if your chickie knows anything, she'll laugh at you for choosing dessert wine! Except if it's with your ice cream.
    Stuey my ,now Ex, works for Casama wines, which is one of the Big Boys, inport export, in the Asia-Europe region.
    Very spoilt for choice and pricing, very SPOILT, but even having the BEST whites, reds and Champas she still prefers the sweet stuff like most young women these days. lol-chris
    ... ptui!

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