Airbag ripoff!!!
  • Register
  • Help
Results 1 to 12 of 12
  1. #1
    Fellow Frogger! R17G's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2002
    Location
    Gold Coast
    Posts
    328

    Default Airbag ripoff!!!

    I posted this in the Renault Forum, but I am sure others are interested as well. Makes you wonder about some dealers!

    From The Road Ahead (RACQ magazine)

    Features - August/September 2004

    It's in the bag
    Story Jim Mathers

    When airbags started to become more common on new cars in Australia in the early 1990s, vehicle manufacturers were unsure of how long unused 'bags' might remain serviceable.

    Advertisement


    With initial estimates ranging from 10 to 15 years, that would mean that the original airbag-equipped cars would shortly be coming under close scrutiny.

    The concern has been that environmental conditions, in particular heat, could lead to the deterioration of the chemicals which trigger airbags in the event of a severe impact. Airbags inflate with explosive speed using an electrically ignited propellant.

    But industry experts are now saying that airbags could, in fact, have a far longer 'life' than originally thought.

    Safety specialist Autoliv, for example, has tested airbags that have been 'in the field' for periods of up to 12 years and found the performance to be within specifications.

    Federal Chamber of Automotive Industries technical and regulatory director Keith Seyer said car owners should consult their vehicle handbooks to check manufacturers' recommendations regarding airbags.

    "Owners of cars with airbags should also remember that there is an airbag warning light in their vehicle, which will advise of any malfunction," Mr Seyer said.

    A number of car companies do not specify any 'expiry date' for airbags in their vehicles.

    However, Volvo, for example, originally specified a 10-year airbag life cycle in its first vehicles equipped with the safety devices.

    Volvo's public affairs manager, Todd Hallenbeck, said the Swedish company had revised its recommendations following testing.

    "When airbags were first released, car companies were working with a technology that didn't have a history in the field," Mr Hallenbeck said.

    "With the first airbags fitted to our cars around 1987 to 1992, Volvo anticipated a 10-year life cycle.

    "However, following crash testing of vehicles which the company bought back from customers, the life expectancy was extended initially to 15 years, and then to 20 years. Over this time, Volvo has found that the chemicals have remained stable."

    Mercedes-Benz originally specified a 15-year life for airbags, after which they would need to be replaced at the owner's cost as part of the service schedule. The European manufacturer has revised its specifications for current models, now saying airbags should last the life of the vehicle.

    Owners would still have to get their vehicles' airbags checked out if the dash warning lamp was illuminated.

    Audi advised that it originally specified that its airbags should be replaced after 14 years. However, the company now says that airbags should last the life of the car to which they are fitted.
    A Gordini is still a GORDINI!!!

  2. #2
    Budding Architect ???? pugrambo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2000
    Location
    Parkes - N.S.W - Australia - Earth
    Posts
    12,256

    Default

    and yet i know of a volvo dealer that has been replacing air bags in customers cars telling people that they have to be done due to age

    makes you wonder if they have done the job and charged accordingly or done the job and still made a nice profit while the customer believes that they are bieng looked after
    3 x '78 604 SL

    1 x '98 306 GTi6

    1 x secret project

    1 x '98 406 STDT troop carrier and i don't care if it stinks, i don't sniff it's arse Death by wank tank

    1 x '99 406SV 5spd wagon, time to burn more fuel

    1 x 1994 605 SV3.0


    WTD long range fuel tank for 605

  3. #3
    Gone Fishin' Ray Bell's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2001
    Location
    Burpengary and Murrumburrah, Qld and NSW
    Posts
    9,223

    Default

    This is all a lot of hogwash...

    Volvo's comment:
    "When airbags were first released, car companies were working with a technology that didn't have a history in the field," Mr Hallenbeck said.

    "With the first airbags fitted to our cars around 1987 to 1992, Volvo anticipated a 10-year life cycle.
    I believe it was 1972 or even earlier when the first death (that I read about) occurred due to an airbag.

    It was in a Dodge Charger, IIRC, and it hit a tree and rolled. By the time the rolling got serious, the bag had (naturally enough) deflated and no protection was afforded the driver. Of course, airbags were always touted as an alternative to belts and this case proved they weren't ever going to be.

    Airbags have been the subject of much controversy and misinformation over the years.

    They have been promoted by insurance companies very heavily, so maybe that's enough said?

  4. #4
    Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    Sydney
    Posts
    103

    Default

    I believe it was 1972 or even earlier when the first death (that I read about) occurred due to an airbag.
    How did the airbag cause the death? it was probably the driver didn't wear a seatbelt or just an unsurviveable accident.

    I thnk it was GM who first fitted an airbag to a production car in 1973

  5. #5
    Simon's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2000
    Location
    Adelaide
    Posts
    6,122

    Default

    Airbags, like cars, have evolved a great deal since 1973. They are both now much improved items.

    The US airbags were much more powerful than those now fitted to Euro and Australian cars because of certain Americans having an attitude that seat belts invaded their personal rights. The bag had to inflate faster to prevent the body colliding with the car interior. Some may remember the American child a short number of years ago who was decapitated and whose head was flicked through the rear window caused by being unrestrained and hit by an airbag.

    I'd say Volvo would have replaced the bags up until recently in the case given by Pugrambo mainly because the life of airbag components and the long term stability of the devices in modern airbags was unknown. Now they probably won't be recommending them to be replaced in the light of the most recent research.

  6. #6
    Budding Architect ???? pugrambo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2000
    Location
    Parkes - N.S.W - Australia - Earth
    Posts
    12,256

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Simon
    Airbags, like cars, have evolved a great deal since 1973. They are both now much improved items.

    The US airbags were much more powerful than those now fitted to Euro and Australian cars because of certain Americans having an attitude that seat belts invaded their personal rights. The bag had to inflate faster to prevent the body colliding with the car interior. Some may remember the American child a short number of years ago who was decapitated and whose head was flicked through the rear window caused by being unrestrained and hit by an airbag.

    I'd say Volvo would have replaced the bags up until recently in the case given by Pugrambo mainly because the life of airbag components and the long term stability of the devices in modern airbags was unknown. Now they probably won't be recommending them to be replaced in the light of the most recent research.

    that child sounds like one that i read about and it was in a VW in the states

    in regards to the bags bieng replaced it was only a matter of about 2 years ago that i heard that the dealer was replacing the bags in the cars so this news has only just come out very recently or...................
    3 x '78 604 SL

    1 x '98 306 GTi6

    1 x secret project

    1 x '98 406 STDT troop carrier and i don't care if it stinks, i don't sniff it's arse Death by wank tank

    1 x '99 406SV 5spd wagon, time to burn more fuel

    1 x 1994 605 SV3.0


    WTD long range fuel tank for 605

  7. #7
    Gone Fishin' Ray Bell's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2001
    Location
    Burpengary and Murrumburrah, Qld and NSW
    Posts
    9,223

    Default

    Originally posted by pastpugdriver
    How did the airbag cause the death? it was probably the driver didn't wear a seatbelt or just an unsurviveable accident.

    I thnk it was GM who first fitted an airbag to a production car in 1973
    Chrysler did a trial lot among the first of those fitted... this car was one of those...

    The aim of insurance companies was to avoid people wearing belts, but to have them rely on airbags instead. With obvious financial benefits to the insurers. This person was thus not wearing a belt but relying totally on the airbag.

    It deployed correctly, but you must remember that they are designed to start deflating immediately. So secondary impacts are a real danger.

  8. #8
    Gone Fishin' Ray Bell's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2001
    Location
    Burpengary and Murrumburrah, Qld and NSW
    Posts
    9,223

    Default

    Nobody twigged yet to how it helps the insurers to put lives at risk in this way?

  9. #9
    sans witticism SLC206's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Location
    North Parramatta
    Posts
    3,986

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Ray Bell
    Nobody twigged yet to how it helps the insurers to put lives at risk in this way?
    Nope.

    BTW, PSA announced a similar thing a few years ago, in 2003:

    Peugeot France has conducted extensive testing on aged airbags and seat belt pre-tensioners. As a result of these tests it was decided that the service life of these devices can be extended by 5 years without compromising safety. At the time of the introduction of air bags and seat belt pre-tensioners in 1994 it was recommended for all pyrotechnic safety equipment to be replaced after a service life of 10 Years. Peugeot will now guarantee serviceability for 15 years. This new recommendation by the manufacturer applies to all Peugeot models.
    Anyone actually had an airbag/pretensioning device replaced due to a time expiry?
    Regards,

    Simon

    2018 308 GTi 2011 DS3 DSport
    ----
    2014 208 GTi 2007 207 GTi 2004 206 GTi180 2000 206 GTi 1995 306 XT

    www.peugeotclub.asn.au

  10. #10
    1000+ Posts catshamlet's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    Hiding in a bush somewhere in ENGLAND
    Posts
    5,312

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Ray Bell
    Nobody twigged yet to how it helps the insurers to put lives at risk in this way?

    I'm probably wrong, (again) but is it cheaper to pay out for outright death, rather than having some poor terribly injured soul needing constant nursing care for x number of years? That would seem to be the case over here.
    But surely common sense would make you wear your belt, no matter if you had airbags or not? I knew a guy once who bought a Volvo 144 brand new and boasted that it was the safest car on the road, but he never wore his belt. Fool! And where is he now? Giving harp lessons to fools.

  11. #11
    Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    Sydney
    Posts
    103

    Default

    I'm probably wrong, (again) but is it cheaper to pay out for outright death, rather than having some poor terribly injured soul needing constant nursing care for x number of years
    Now that is cynical.
    If that was the case tehn the insurance companies would have wanted the status quo to remain. Non-cumpulsory seatbelts/seatbelt wearing in the USA.

    It's in the insurance companies benefit to reduce early deaths as this is what personal insurance policies usually cover - DEATH.

  12. #12
    Gone Fishin' Ray Bell's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2001
    Location
    Burpengary and Murrumburrah, Qld and NSW
    Posts
    9,223

    Default

    Originally posted by catshamlet
    I'm probably wrong, (again) but is it cheaper to pay out for outright death, rather than having some poor terribly injured soul needing constant nursing care for x number of years?
    Yes, you are wrong...

    The reason was that they jacked up the price of the cars. This jacked up the premiums on the insurance, and so while they were investing the premiums and awaiting claims they made more money.

    Road & Track magazine had a lot of low-down on this kind of stuff in those years.

    As for the death vs. injury costs, they would merely adjust the premiums to suit the expenditure over time. No problem to them!

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •