Fuel Injection
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Thread: Fuel Injection

  1. #1
    1000+ Posts okalford's Avatar
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    Icon5 Fuel Injection

    What is fuel injection and what are the advantages/disadvantages of it?
    Pardon me for being so unknowledgable but after all, I'm just a tadpole!
    Kaye

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  2. #2
    1000+ Posts dino's Avatar
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    well...as the name implies.....fuel injection reffers to fuel being injected......as opposed to being supplied via carburation.....advantages are numerous...fine fuel metering, better control of mixtures across the range and all controled by ecu.......read some of the following links and do a general sweep of the net....its all out there......but as far as advantages and disadvantages efi offers smoother running, easier starting, better fuel economy ...etc etc....although there is nothing wrong with the sound of twin webers under bonnet......problem with carburated cars is they require more regular tuning (esp multiple carbs) , advantage being that much of this can be done at home....wheras most efi systems require expert attention ie...system is more complex (injectors afms(or other)ignition modules, ecu and a myriad of other sensors the system is dependant on in keeping it all nice and smooth)





    http://www.superstreetonline.com/featuredvehicles/3152/


    http://www.nissanperformancemag.com/june04/ask_sarah/


    http://www.indiacar.com/index2.asp?p...mech_terms.htm


    cheers


    dino

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    Member DSpecial1's Avatar
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    This article is a nice little primer on fuel injection:

    http://auto.howstuffworks.com/fuel-injection.htm

    Plenty of other good basic info on cars on this site as well.

    Michael W

    74 D Special

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    Give me a well set up carby car any day. While emissions are better on EFI cars they can be a money bucket when they play up and you don't know where to start. That is when you have to go to the 'experts', which is no problem if you know a real expert - if you get the drift.
    JoBo

  5. #5
    1000+ Posts okalford's Avatar
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    Thanks everyone, lots of good reading at those sites. I've only ever had cars with carbys. I find the newer generation of cars a bit spooky being the possible cost of maintainance. I'm used to a service costing $90 to $150 and small breakdowns below $200. Looking into a newer car I don't want to find out later it will cost say $800 to get serviced,
    Kaye

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    Fellow Frogger!
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    No ma'am, a general service won't cost you much more than $200.

    The true benefits in Fuel injection is it's embedded in engine management. All the hassles of cold-starts, poor idle, 4barrel opening point etc are all gone...

    But its limitations are in upgrading/tuning where to those that aren't electronically minded or dont have access to EEPROM writers are charged an arm and a leg for these so-called "performance chips".

  7. #7
    Real cars have hydraulics DoubleChevron's Avatar
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    Fuel injection is ok. Infact it's bloody brilliant. I have one dead fuel injected car at home at the moment. I wouldn't swap it's fuel injection for a carby ... ever ... Even though it's fuel injection is causing me quite a few headaches

    Performance is also dramatically improved with fuel injection, especially when your talking torque/power curves. Carby cars rarely have the torque down low that fuel injected cars have .. Not unless there low revving old plodders.

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    Shane L.
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    1000+ Posts cruiserman's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by DoubleChevron
    Fuel injection is ok. Infact it's bloody brilliant. I have one dead fuel injected car at home at the moment. I wouldn't swap it's fuel injection for a carby ... ever ... Even though it's fuel injection is causing me quite a few headaches

    Performance is also dramatically improved with fuel injection, especially when your talking torque/power curves. Carby cars rarely have the torque down low that fuel injected cars have .. Not unless there low revving old plodders.

    seeya,
    Shane L.
    That is if you can ever get them going again
    Neil
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  9. #9
    Real cars have hydraulics DoubleChevron's Avatar
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    Seriously fuel injection isn't as complicated as people make out.

    In my case fault finding has been severly comprimised as there is probably only 2 or 3 CX 2500 GTi Turbos in the country. I haven't had time to debug mine any further. I should have 12volts (I have 6volts) at the AFM (which I have with the AFM unplugged). This means there is 6volts being dropped somewhere else. Either internally inside the AFM, or in the earth return circuitry of the computer. Either way I doubt it'll be fixable my end. I'll either have to replace the AFM or injection computer. It it was a BX or poogoe or Fowlcan/crummydore I'd just plug another computer in to see if it would fix the problem. The head to the local wreckers and buy another 2nd hand computer.

    Fuel injection is still well worth having. eg: I could rarely get more than 26mpg out of my old CX2400's no matter how gently I drove. The CX GTi Turbo with considerably more power and fuel injection regually returns 34mpg on a trip. However as a bonus it'll get to 100km/h in about 7.8seconds and has 300Nm of torque from 3000rpm.

    seeya,
    Shane L.
    'Cit' homepage:
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    '63 ID19 http://www.aussiefrogs.com/forum/showthread.php?t=90325
    '72 DS21 ie 5spd pallas (last looked at ... about 15years ago)
    '78 GS1220 pallas
    '92 Range Rover Classic ... 5spd manual.

    Yay ... No Slugomatics


    Modern Junk:
    '07 Poogoe 407 HDi 6spd manual

  10. #10
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    Double Chevron : is your Air-Flow-Meter a hot-wire, trap door or vortex spiral arrangement. I ask this because most hot-wire arrangements run a pair of platinum wires. A current is passed through these wires and the quantity of air rushing over (cooling) the wires gives the resulting voltage. If only one of the wires is severed/defective then according to the kirchoffs law and ohms law then the maximum achievable voltage is half (assuming identical material resistances).

    I think thats right... although it is midnight - my brain turned off an hour ago.

    If it is not a hot-wire arrangement then disregard this post

    -Q.

  11. #11
    Real cars have hydraulics DoubleChevron's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by XsaraVTS
    Double Chevron : is your Air-Flow-Meter a hot-wire, trap door or vortex spiral arrangement. I ask this because most hot-wire arrangements run a pair of platinum wires. A current is passed through these wires and the quantity of air rushing over (cooling) the wires gives the resulting voltage. If only one of the wires is severed/defective then according to the kirchoffs law and ohms law then the maximum achievable voltage is half (assuming identical material resistances).

    I think thats right... although it is midnight - my brain turned off an hour ago.

    If it is not a hot-wire arrangement then disregard this post

    -Q.
    Hi Xsara,

    nah she's an old L Jetronic, it's the AFM with a flap that mechanically moves a contact over a lazor cut carbon track. There pretty tough AFM and ususally go bad when the track the contract runs over wears through.

    seeya,
    Shane L.
    'Cit' homepage:
    Citroen Workshop
    Proper cars--
    '85 Series II CX2500 GTi Turbo I
    '63 ID19 http://www.aussiefrogs.com/forum/showthread.php?t=90325
    '72 DS21 ie 5spd pallas (last looked at ... about 15years ago)
    '78 GS1220 pallas
    '92 Range Rover Classic ... 5spd manual.

    Yay ... No Slugomatics


    Modern Junk:
    '07 Poogoe 407 HDi 6spd manual

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by XsaraVTS
    Double Chevron : is your Air-Flow-Meter a hot-wire, trap door or vortex spiral arrangement. I ask this because most hot-wire arrangements run a pair of platinum wires. A current is passed through these wires and the quantity of air rushing over (cooling) the wires gives the resulting voltage. If only one of the wires is severed/defective then according to the kirchoffs law and ohms law then the maximum achievable voltage is half (assuming identical material resistances).

    I think thats right... although it is midnight - my brain turned off an hour ago.

    If it is not a hot-wire arrangement then disregard this post

    -Q.
    The hot wire sensor is not used on plain L-Jet - it's used on LH-Jet - 'H' is for Hot.

    It's a bit more complicated than the scenario above, as the two wires have different functions - for example, one is heated to a fixed temp. above ambient by the application of the appropriate current, whereas the other isn't. I doubt whether they'd ever get 12 volts through them. I think Shane was referring to the voltage provided to the AFM?

    I agree with Shane though. Work out what everything does on an FI system and they aren't a problem. Especially Bosch, which are pretty damn reliable.

    Stuey

  13. #13
    1000+ Posts Pugnut403's Avatar
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    I agree with Shane though. Work out what everything does on an FI system and they aren't a problem. Especially Bosch, which are pretty damn reliable.
    It is still confusing if you have never done much with EFi though. I have to convert a Ford Falcon from carby to EFi in the next few weeks and then track down the cause of the misfire in the fuel system. The last EFi car we had was when I was about 5 years old.
    Many hours of poring over wiring and fuel diagrams in the next few weeks I think......
    Pugs Rule!

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