Backyard panel-beating
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  1. #1
    Fellow Frogger! Jason20's Avatar
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    Default Backyard panel-beating

    My cars bonnet has a slight crease in it, does anyone have any panel beating know-how?

    Or, how much would a panel beater charge approx, no spraypainting would be required I assume.


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  2. #2
    Real cars have hydraulics DoubleChevron's Avatar
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    Hmm,

    you'll never fix it yourself without painting it. You could try the paintless dent removal places in the phone book.

    If you have never DIY'd before with panel work I doubt you'd get a panel straight without a helping hand. You can literly chase a dent right across the bonnet. To fix it yourself you need to knock the edges of the dent low, sand the paint back to bare metal and smear it with plastic filler. Sand and re-fill repeatedly until it's perfect. Then spray putty, paint, clear (if required) etc....

    Not difficult at all but I'd suggest having someone that can run there hand over & let you know if it's ready for painting if you try yourself.

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  3. #3
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    Jason

    It depends if the metal will pop back under pressure or if the crease is stretched into the metal. Sometimes pressure on the rear of a dent will spring it back into place without any real panel beating and minor denting can be removed by rubbing along the dent line with a smooth wooden object while the bonnet rests on a leather bag filled with sand.

    If a dent or scratch has to be hammered back into place you are reversing the original stretching that caused the dent and you will end up with a protrusion that will look worse than the crease. The only way to get rid of that is by plannishing the surface with a hammer and dolly and then applying small dots of heat with an oxy torch that are hammered and quenched to shrink the metal restoring its original tension, then filing to find high/low spots and planishing to raise low spots and again shrink high spots.

    Not really what an unskilled backyarder can do without some training in the basic process of panel-beating. The bonnet will then require refinishing and re-painting. There are some books in libraries that illustrate the process and that may be helpful if you decide to tackle the process.

    In any case better to practice on another car rather than your pride and joy Its also a good thing to have a good set of well maintained panel beating tools.

    Ken

  4. #4
    Fellow Frogger! Jason20's Avatar
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    The dents acually protruding outwards, like something was left under the bonnet, then the bonnet was shut. It's a straight crease line, wouldn't say it's a dent really. I was going to go at it with a rubber mallet & a piece of wood underneath... It's not really that noticable as the white paint hides it a little.. Im not exactly prepared to get the spraygun out...
    I just did my front bumper bar a few months ago... I sanded the whole thing back to bare plastic by hand!!! came nice though.

    Thanks Shane

  5. #5
    Fellow Frogger! Jason20's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kenfuego
    Jason

    It depends if the metal will pop back under pressure or if the crease is stretched into the metal. Sometimes pressure on the rear of a dent will spring it back into place without any real panel beating and minor denting can be removed by rubbing along the dent line with a smooth wooden object while the bonnet rests on a leather bag filled with sand.

    If a dent or scratch has to be hammered back into place you are reversing the original stretching that caused the dent and you will end up with a protrusion that will look worse than the crease. The only way to get rid of that is by plannishing the surface with a hammer and dolly and then applying small dots of heat with an oxy torch that are hammered and quenched to shrink the metal restoring its original tension, then filing to find high/low spots and planishing to raise low spots and again shrink high spots.

    Not really what an unskilled backyarder can do without some training in the basic process of panel-beating. The bonnet will then require refinishing and re-painting. There are some books in libraries that illustrate the process and that may be helpful if you decide to tackle the process.

    In any case better to practice on another car rather than your pride and joy Its also a good thing to have a good set of well maintained panel beating tools.

    Ken
    Thanks Ken,
    sounds tricky.
    I'll try giving it a few light taps just to try & reverse the stretching..
    Doesn't really have to be perfect.

  6. #6
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    Ok

    But don't use the rubber mallet as it is hard to control the pressure needed to move the dent, better to hold a metal dolly under the dent and lightly tap the surface with a metal hammer, perhaps with something thin and soft between the face of the hamer and the painted surface.

    Myself I prefer to use formed and polished hardwood to press down on the dent and see if I can shift it back carefully or at least make it less noticeable and then buff and polish the surface. Have a practice on a similar but less valued car!!

    Ken

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    1000+ Posts cruiserman's Avatar
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    If it goes pear shaped Jason I have a white bonnet available.
    Neil
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    Fellow Frogger! Jason20's Avatar
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    no rubber mallet, check.


    Thanks cruiserman, hold onto it for me!

  9. #9
    1000+ Posts Pugnut403's Avatar
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    I'd be very careful hitting it with a metal hammer, as you are quite likely to stretch it further.
    Generally the rule is if the metal is supported on something softer than the hitting implement it will stretch, as it also will if it is hit between two hard surfaces.
    On the other hand if it is hit with a hammer softer than the support material it will tend to shrink. This of course does not apply if you belt it.
    I would suggest a wooden mallet while supporting it with metal as being the best bet.

    If you are keen to get a bit more detailed info you should go to the library and order the two metal working books by Ron Fournier as they are excellent and cover the subject in detail, even giving a few basic projects to get the principles mastered.
    Try it, it is fun, but practice on something else first or you will probably regret it.
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