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    JBN
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    Default Electric Cars

    Shenzhen has 21.000 electric taxi's and most of them charge at this charging station. 650+ electric cars can be charged here at once. Most of them are BYD taxis, but there are also some people owned cars. What does it look like? What do the taxi drivers think of the fact that they have to drive electric cars? And what are the other car brands you can find at the station? One of the brands we find is NIO, a Telsa-type electric car brand that young people like a lot. This video is EPISODE 01 of the "INSIDE CHINA'S MOBILITY

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=r6Vp0IrkU54

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    1000+ Posts Peter C's Avatar
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    That was very interesting. The Chinese seem to be on the way with the fleet. Are any other countries at this stage yet?

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    Goes to show that China is a very advanced economy and not a developing one or a de-veloping one like ours.

    Did the presenter mention that e-cars there are 'green' and clean? Not so sure about that with 24% of their electricity from renewables and the rest from coal.
    https://www.google.com/search?sxsrf=...30.PYGBhYDj-VE
    The AF deleted German study showed that with 19% renewables e-cars are not 'cleaner' that modern diesels. Wonder where the break even is?
    Anyway, the Chinese are on the right or rightish track.
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    Obviously Holland is a target country, the hot gospelling announcer knows the promotion points better than the people he interviews, I wonder how the price of the electricity is set, as from the remarks of the Taxi Drivers it is set much cheaper than Petrol or Diesel, and most seems to be company owned structure and the Taxi fleet?

    Low priced Australian coal? Nuclear? and I see Warren Buffet in for the return, John you might have to suggest investment to our Super conglomerates. I like the idea of electric moped's able to charge, looking to the future of course when I might have to resort to one of those. BYD looks to be preparing a catalogue off the shelf product ranging from those electric train, buses etc, No promotions yet for Australia but you never know.

    Ken

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    I do like electric motors. Four of them at 25kgs each for a total of 400+kw will be amazing. Once they sort out the energy so it's as light as a tank of fuel and as easy to recharge as it is to refill there'll be no looking back.
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    China doesn't have much choice but to get rid of IC engines after they have polluted their own air to the point they can't breathe. Right now I think this their main motivation behind going electric, global warming may have nothing to do with it (or very little). Great opportunity for them to become leaders in electric vehicle production and perhaps start exporting.
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    Sort of reminds one of the pre silicon valley days in computer hardware. glitzy promotion, razzmatazz but state sponsored.

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    Was told that private buyers if e-cars in France get a 8K euro subsidy. Business buyers don't. Electricity carries a 20% tax.
    From what i gather, e-cars make sense in France as far as emissions go (hi % of nuclear generation as well a renewables i suspect)
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    Quote Originally Posted by schlitzaugen View Post
    China doesn't have much choice but to get rid of IC engines after they have polluted their own air to the point they can't breathe. Right now I think this their main motivation behind going electric, global warming may have nothing to do with it (or very little). Great opportunity for them to become leaders in electric vehicle production and perhaps start exporting.
    They also know its the way the world is going (not withstanding de-veloping backwaters like Oz...) and as a result they'll own the automotive industry in a couple of decades - the established players have been too slow to adapt.
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    AS I noted in the Fuel thread, there are several international groups that are vying with each other to move into the Australian fuel selling market. They have probably done their research as to long term profitability on investment return and buying into established Import and retailing chains.

    Much cheaper than trying to establish new structures and facilities and Shell walked away from the CNG idea for the same cost benefit ratio a few years back.

    The long distances that are travelled in Australia and remote locations, means to those big players, years of selling while the ordinary joe/Josephine in the street determines what he or she wants to choose that suits their needs and thus the consumer market.

    Ken

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    Quote Originally Posted by schlitzaugen View Post
    China doesn't have much choice but to get rid of IC engines after they have polluted their own air to the point they can't breathe. Right now I think this their main motivation behind going electric, global warming may have nothing to do with it (or very little). Great opportunity for them to become leaders in electric vehicle production and perhaps start exporting.
    On the other hand, if they do nothing about their air pollution, it will probably produce results surpassing their one child policy in reducing their population, WITHOUT political repercussions. You can always blame it on God, but nobody believes in God so it is a win-win for the politicians.

    John

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    Quote Originally Posted by Kenfuego View Post
    AS I noted in the Fuel thread, there are several international groups that are vying with each other to move into the Australian fuel selling market. They have probably done their research as to long term profitability on investment return and buying into established Import and retailing chains.

    Much cheaper than trying to establish new structures and facilities and Shell walked away from the CNG idea for the same cost benefit ratio a few years back.

    The long distances that are travelled in Australia and remote locations, means to those big players, years of selling while the ordinary joe/Josephine in the street determines what he or she wants to choose that suits their needs and thus the consumer market.

    Ken
    My better half would now rather fly to places like Merimbula from Melbourne rather than be stuck in a nice car with her other half for six hours battling traffic and speed cameras. It now takes longer to go anywhere any distance by car than it did fifty years ago in the days of prima facie speed limits. Long distance travel by car no longer adds up!
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    Last time I drove to Melbourne, in November, it involved a bit over 8 hours of actual driving.
    That is quite a bit less than, say, 20 years ago.
    Huge improvments to the M1 going north have also cut the driving time to Brisbane by quite a lot over the years.

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    Quote Originally Posted by 1972Ren View Post
    Last time I drove to Melbourne, in November, it involved a bit over 8 hours of actual driving.
    That is quite a bit less than, say, 20 years ago.
    Huge improvments to the M1 going north have also cut the driving time to Brisbane by quite a lot over the years.
    Between 1967 and 1974 I regularly made Hornsby from Melbourne in just under eight hours up the two lane (not dual carriageway) Hume Highway. Hornsby to Newcastle took another three hours on the old dual lane Pacific Highway. It would appear that the only thing that has improved over all those years is the Sydney to Newcastle sector, which now allows you to travel the whole distance without your tyres squealing the whole way.............
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    I guess my point remains the same, the overseas companies will get their profits from fuel sold, for balloon flights (LPG), diesel to propel ocean racers when the wind don't blow and jet fuel + additional costs for those wanting to travel to remote locations in Australia and most of that re-supply infrastructure is in place right now and available for write down in normal business costs, whatever happens in the next 50 years. If Joe and Josephine find that suits them and governments don't try to force their hand, I guess the market future will tell the story....eventually.

    Ken

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    Quote Originally Posted by Kim Luck View Post
    Between 1967 and 1974 I regularly made Hornsby from Melbourne in just under eight hours up the two lane (not dual carriageway) Hume Highway. Hornsby to Newcastle took another three hours on the old dual lane Pacific Highway. It would appear that the only thing that has improved over all those years is the Sydney to Newcastle sector, which now allows you to travel the whole distance without your tyres squealing the whole way.............
    That story appears to have improved over the years. Even being generous, if you count 'Melbourne' to Hornsby as Cragieburn to Hornsby it's 901km up the completely bypassed Doom Dieway today. Back in 1974 there were no towns bypassed - you needed to slow down and drive through the middle of each town. Doing that in 8 hours these days would involve an average speed of over 110km/h. Back in 1974 the distances were quite a bit longer - and you needed to slow down through every town - meaning your 'cruising' speed needed to be much higher to maintain that average. All you've proved here was that you drove a lot faster back in 1974.

    These days Melbourne to Sydney is a breeze. You can sit on a cruise control 110km/h for pretty much the whole distance - even Holbrook has been fully bypassed now. I jump on the M2 just down the road, and the Melbourne ring roads take you anywhere quickly.

    I don't get why people fly short distances. To get to Melbourne from Sydney by plane I have to either drive and pay for parking or get a shuttle to the airport - time through all the traffic and money. If I'm at the airport I'm waiting - customs, baggage, check-in lead times. Then add the cost of the flight. You might get some cheapies every now and then but from my experience it's well over $100. When you land you need to clear your bags, get out of the airport, and then either hire a car or use public transport to get somewhere - and then you don't have your own car for transport - cost again and the inconvenience. If I drive I'm on the M2 within 4 mins - set the cruise for 100km/h and then 110km/h and I'm in Melbourne before I know it. The 308 HDi just lopes along at under 5l/100 making it cheap to get there. Once I get there I have the convenience of the car to drive around in - and I can take all the crap with me I'll need and not have to worry about jamming it into one bag.

    Did this thread really start with electric cars ?

    Cheers

    Justin
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    Done Melb to Sydney in my new Kona electric several times now. (Bringing back to EVs ☺ ). No slower than doing same trip in petrol car when taking normal rest breaks every 2 -3 hrs of driving. Also done Melb-Syd-Coffs Harbour, then back via Tamworth/ Dubbo/Melb due to forced detour round bushfires when they first started on coast in October ... Also easy to do via regional network of DC fast chargers (Many thanks to NRMA for the spine of them now already there).
    Cheers
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    Quote Originally Posted by Only19 View Post
    Done Melb to Sydney in my new Kona electric several times now. (Bringing back to EVs ☺ ). No slower than doing same trip in petrol car when taking normal rest breaks every 2 -3 hrs of driving. Also done Melb-Syd-Coffs Harbour, then back via Tamworth/ Dubbo/Melb due to forced detour round bushfires when they first started on coast in October ... Also easy to do via regional network of DC fast chargers (Many thanks to NRMA for the spine of them now already there).
    Cheers
    Bryce
    Just out of interest how long are those breaks?

    When I drive Melbourne to Sydney, I usually do it in two stages stopping for lunch at Holbrook and to also top up the tank in the car because it does not have the range to do the trip on one tank.

    It takes me about 9 1/2 hours from Port Melbourne to Quakers Hill depending on traffic, roadworks and length of lunch break.
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    Quote Originally Posted by COL View Post
    Just out of interest how long are those breaks?

    When I drive Melbourne to Sydney, I usually do it in two stages stopping for lunch at Holbrook and to also top up the tank in the car because it does not have the range to do the trip on one tank.

    It takes me about 9 1/2 hours from Port Melbourne to Quakers Hill depending on traffic, roadworks and length of lunch break.
    With the Diesel Megane, we can do Melb/Sydney fine without a fuel top up, but these days I have to do a "convenience stop" usually pick a Mc Donalds just off the Highway, charges the inner self... and relieves at the same time.

    We do often top up so we don't run out of fuel, that would be embarrassing...…..

    Ken

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    Drove to Sydney recently and it took 10 hrs with regular stretch stops every 2 hours. The Megane 1.2 did it with one tank of fuel easily. did it in Kim's time in 81/2 hours thanks to doing normal speeds
    Justin's 308 HDi is also less polluting than a TESLA would be given our low renewable electricity supplies.
    Don't know about the Kona???
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    The travel times are a bit subjective, they all depend on many factors such as place of start and finish; time of day that ones travels; road works; and how much suburban travel there is.

    Would be interesting to compare travel times from post office Melbourne to post office Sydney from say in 1970 to today's times.

    My travel times are taken form Station Pier to my mates place at Quakers Hill in Sydney.
    Regards Col

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    Fake news. The consumers want ICE, those toy electric cars are only for the inner city latte drinkers.

    Quote Originally Posted by Only19 View Post
    Done Melb to Sydney in my new Kona electric several times now. (Bringing back to EVs ☺ ). No slower than doing same trip in petrol car when taking normal rest breaks every 2 -3 hrs of driving. Also done Melb-Syd-Coffs Harbour, then back via Tamworth/ Dubbo/Melb due to forced detour round bushfires when they first started on coast in October ... Also easy to do via regional network of DC fast chargers (Many thanks to NRMA for the spine of them now already there).
    Cheers
    Bryce
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    Quote Originally Posted by JoBo View Post
    Justin's 308 HDi is also less polluting than a TESLA would be given our low renewable electricity supplies.
    ?
    Doesn't quite work like that, and even if it does the EV is still better. There have been a few "studies" bandied around lately that claim diesel is better and they're all debunked.
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    Would love to have the German study debunked. Comparison between TESLA 3 and MB 220d with their 19% renewable source.
    In Austria for example, they have over 32% renewable, an e-car would be better hands down.
    Still, it's great that people buy e-cars in Australia to encourage more renewable energy sources. Already are even preferable in big cities (for their residents )even though the emissions are transferred to less populated areas.
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    Quote Originally Posted by N5GTi6 View Post

    All you've proved here was that you drove a lot faster back in 1974.


    Did this thread really start with electric cars ?

    Cheers

    Justin
    You are right on the money. The R10 would cruise comfortably at 130km/h, the R16 at 140km/h and the R16Ts at 150km/h. It was necessary to slow down in known policed areas, simply for self preservation but as I was leaving Melbourne at around 8pm, the traffic consisted mainly of trucks which were easy to pass. The Bulls were nearly all in bed by the time I got to the interesting parts of the Hume in NSW. I'd be happy to drive an electric vehicle at the same speeds now if I thought I could get away with it........
    Don't it always seem to go that you don't know what you've got 'til it's gone............

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