Everything comes around again (eventually)
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Thread: Everything comes around again (eventually)

  1. #1
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    Default Everything comes around again (eventually)

    In 1948 the sale of the 202 was delayed in NSW because the registration authorities refused approval. The headlights were too close together. Had to have the lights mounted on the guards. Now Victorian authorities have a similar regulation, noted when registering a new tractor. Because the lights are less than 600 mm apart it does not meet design standards. Registration is still possible with the provision a rotating yellow light must be displayed on the roof at all times while being used on a public road. So the next time you meet a 202 or 402 travelling down a Victorian road with a yellow beacon on the roof, you'll know why.

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    Land Rover Series I and II had the headlights fitted between the projecting guards, though a bit wider apart than a 202's pair. They were registered as Motor Lorries. Quite a few are still around. The 1970 Series IIA had to move the lights to the guards to be accepted.

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    1000+ Posts Kim Luck's Avatar
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    The steel cab Atkinson trucks built by IH originally had a set of lights mounted high on the front grille as driving lights. It was found that they were too high (over 48") and the design of the grille had to be changed to comply. Now we see driving lights four wide mounted on ute and truck roofs. https://www.google.com.au/url?sa=i&r...51167541406303
    Don't it always seem to go that you don't know what you've got 'til it's gone............

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    JBN
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    Quote Originally Posted by Russell Hall View Post
    In 1948 the sale of the 202 was delayed in NSW because the registration authorities refused approval. The headlights were too close together. Had to have the lights mounted on the guards. Now Victorian authorities have a similar regulation, noted when registering a new tractor. Because the lights are less than 600 mm apart it does not meet design standards. Registration is still possible with the provision a rotating yellow light must be displayed on the roof at all times while being used on a public road. So the next time you meet a 202 or 402 travelling down a Victorian road with a yellow beacon on the roof, you'll know why.
    Why not use red and blue flashing lights? You will be able to travel down that road a lot quicker.

    John

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    WLB
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    Quote Originally Posted by Russell Hall View Post
    .... Now Victorian authorities have a similar regulation,......
    Yet it's OK under our design regulations, to have front turn indicators located within a stylish and complex headlight assembly, where they can only be seen when the car is pointing directly towards you. Or rear indicators surrounded by very bright stop-lights, where they can't be easily seen when the brakes are on.
    citroenut and dino like this.

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    I've always found the magic switch that turns on the red and blues a great aid to progress except in Sydney where the drivers can sense hesitation in a country tanker driver.
    There was quite a screed on the registration papers about the lights that I have never seen before and we had to sign.

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    Yes. The last tractor I registered (about 5 years ago) had more complex and onerous paperwork requirements than earlier ones.

    Roger

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    1000+ Posts Peter Chisholm's Avatar
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    Russell, as all your history articles are, this is great reading. Thank you.

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