70 mpg Peugeot Diesel 508! and 2019 predictions ?
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Thread: 70 mpg Peugeot Diesel 508! and 2019 predictions ?

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    Icon14 70 mpg Peugeot Diesel 508! and 2019 predictions ?

    https://www.autoexpress.co.uk/car-ne...rce=newsletter

    UK auto Express article on 2019 new car markets and side comment on Carlos Ghosn affair.. EV "wars" ??? competition?.

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    Liked the confidence in the frugal large vehicle report, where the writer praises the 70 mpg normal driving of the Diesel Peugeot 508, seems to infer that other diesels should achieve that target.


    Dave Cavanagh likes his Pug Diesels, how about this one Dave...


    Ken

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    Cars were once very economical but economy was sacrificed for power and speed. After all a small Peugeot travelled Melbourne to Sydney in the early 1920's and returned 73 mpg. As the ads said, less than the price of a second class rail fare. All those gates to open and close on the way to Sydney. Owners of the Quadrillette reported fuel use of 60 mpg.
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    1000+ Posts Beano's Avatar
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    Yair, well....at 667 cc and a light body, you'd expect pretty good economy. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Peugeot_Quadrilette

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    But even as the cyclecar grew into a proper car economy remained a priority. The 5HP would also give 60 mpg and the 7HP was "guaranteed to not give less than 55 miles to the gallon". Travel at less than a penny a mile. In many ways those little Peugeots of the 1920's were forerunners of modern economical city cars.
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    I wonder about the upbeat commencement of the year, seems to be predicting a very competitive year despite the Brexit doom and Gloom.
    Enough of the negativity. This year is shaping up to be one of the most exciting in living memory. For starters, new car buyers will be telling themselves that if 25 per cent discounts were available on some volume cars in 2018, cuts could be more generous in 2019 as supplies outstrip demand. Alternatively, if you thought a budget of 7 a day/49 a week for your next lease car meant you’d be unable to drive a premium product from a German maker, think again. Such a motor is within reach. Honest.
    Also mouth-watering is the EV war about to break out between wet-behind-the-ears Tesla, up-and-coming JLR, the reinvigorated VW empire, unpredictable BMW and old stalwart Merc. There will be winners, losers and injuries – one or two fatal, perhaps. So make sure you back the right side and get in early as waiting lists for these new models – and existing EVs – are already stretching towards the end of this new year.
    If you’re in the majority and still not ready to go down the relatively expensive pure-electric or petrol-electric routes, don’t rule out tried-and-tested diesel – and enjoy 70mpg on leisurely runs. That’s the real-world consumption I achieved over Christmas, in a big, surprisingly endearing Peugeot 508. It’s not the best car in the world. But in eco driving mode it is the most frugal large vehicle I’ve ever driven. And it’s proof state-of-the-art diesel tech can still be a winner – despite mentalists and politicians trying to murder it.
    In 2019 we petrol/diesel/electric/hydrogen heads are in for an exciting, if bumpy, ride. So let’s enjoy it, while reminding anyone who’ll listen that HM Treasury and UK PLC continue to be propped up by the 50bn-plus we drivers pay annually in road user taxation

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    1000+ Posts Haakon's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Russell Hall View Post
    Cars were once very economical but economy was sacrificed for power and speed. After all a small Peugeot travelled Melbourne to Sydney in the early 1920's and returned 73 mpg. As the ads said, less than the price of a second class rail fare. All those gates to open and close on the way to Sydney. Owners of the Quadrillette reported fuel use of 60 mpg.
    Economy (or more accurately, realising the improved economy of efficient drivetrains was forgone) was sacrificed more so for the weight of decent crash structures and equipment.
    I tried to drown my sorrows in alcohol, but the bastards learnt how to swim

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    Safety was not an issue in pre war car design.
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    Hi
    Yes old small cars were economical for fuel use. But do not forget the other costs. Twice round the block and change the oil, clean the plugs, set the points etc. Weekend for servicing the car !!
    My first car was a R750 and drove on the smell of an oily rag, but I would not go back there. Flat strap at 90KPH and not too stable at that either.
    I believe the weight increase was caused by some safety feature sure, but more by the standard features we "need" today. Electric windows, air conditioners, big comfortable electric seats, carpets, door trims ?, big fat wheels, big fat motors etc etc !
    You go to third world countries and they get by without a lot of size and luxury(and safety) we now have been conditioned to see as necessary. So perhaps it is us that is the cause of some of the backward steps.
    Jaahn

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    In 1920's Australia only the well off could afford a new car of any sort. So if you could buy a car fuel use wasn't really such an issue. By the late 1920's the demand for small highly economical one and two seaters had largely disappeared. The best selling little Peugeots weren't selling by 1928. Everyone wanted a Chevrolet and the devil could pay for the fuel. Small cars grew up into the 8hp class. After the war there was an attempt to revive the very small highly economical car in France but people preferred the "real" cars like the 2CV and the Renault 4CV.

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    We nearly saw one of the French post war minis in Australia. A stand was booked for the Rovin at the 1951 Melbourne Motor Show but the car failed to arrive.

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