Scams coming almost daily since changing bank details on "Secure"Computershare web s
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Thread: Scams coming almost daily since changing bank details on "Secure"Computershare web s

  1. #1
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    Default Scams coming almost daily since changing bank details on "Secure"Computershare web s

    About 2 weeks ago my wife and I changed our crediting arrangements for dividends on the supposedly secure Computershare site ( many hoops to jump through to get in ). We received notification from companies involved that crediting arrangements updated . All good so far - but almost immediately we started receiving obvious scam emails ( poor spelling - language from subcontinent ) for an account mentioned in the crediting change for which there was no internet access. The scam asked us to click here and give details to unlock the account - obviously we did not respond , now Computershare are saying that this spike in fishing is nothing to do with them. Has anybody else had a recent spike in scam fishing ? The emails are now coming in relation to accounts with banks we have never had anything to do with and Western Union ( may be this was ample give away that it was a scam !)
    The attempted scammers are now suggesting I have a Tax debt to be paid to avoid arrest ! via a phone number that was given in amongst the hoops Computershare insisted we comply with - again the voice was a give away ( from the subcontinent )

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  2. #2
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    Just the normal range of scam calls and 'phishing' e-mails by the sounds of it. They seem to come in waves. Nothing for months then bombardment with cold calls for a few days. They mostly ignore requests to not call.

    Most phishing e-mails I receive are caught by my ISP and only a few slip past. I log onto webmail every so often and go through the spam folder because they sometimes catch legit e-mails too. Scammers target the major telcos, banks and social media sites (Facebook, linkedin etc.) as they have a better chance of tricking someone than if they call/e-mail claiming they are from a little known entity. So, you may bank only with NAB, but you will still receive phishing e-mails for others like CBA/ANZ etc. with the sender assuming most will miss their target.

    Are you saying the e-mail had you actual account number or just the name of the bank? It's usual for those e-mails to link to some unrelated website (hover the mouse over the link and look at what the link actually is down the bottom left of the screen) that then tries to get you to logon to harvest your logon. Then the scammers can access your real account and clean it out. Facebook access is now valuable to scammers as many websites let you log on via your Facebook account.

    I just took one of those accident claim fishing calls, where they cold call and say they have your phone# in a list against an accident you had in the last couple of years and were seeking confirmation and further information. The callers never specify when/where the accident was because no such accident event exists and they are hoping for you to offer a date/place that they can then work with. Those people are just taking some number from the phone book and seeking names to pass on to some ambulance chasing scum lawyers as a possible case referral or simply identity thieves or. Give them nothing.

  3. #3
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    I keep repeating this as though demented--
    Display your emails in plain text (ie, disable HTML)!!!

    This not only is in accordance with the email standard, but it makes all the obfuscation of links, and fake letterheads disappear. Nobody would be fooled by a "bank" at youidiot.ru.

    I had a giggle yesterday. Someone rang about my computer security. It was a VoIP call with spoofed caller ID. I was blasted with jargon that sounded like a Two Ronnies sketch. As soon as I replied using genuine jargon she hung up.
    Kenfuego likes this.

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    The spam keeps coming even if you start a brand new email address guaranteed you'll get spam within 2 days??

    The one that had me scratching my head was another fake PayPal email that had ny full name....they are getting clever indeed but sent it straight to [email protected] and confirmed to delete.

    Some people have nothing better to do but waste their time trying to rip people off😠

    Sent from my SM-G900I using aussiefrogs mobile app

  5. #5
    1000+ Posts driven's Avatar
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    Scammers are ripping off Australians $340 million each year.
    Makes more money than begging on street

    https://www.news.com.au/finance/mone...b5839948cef09c

  6. #6
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    I should add that I recently updated something via Computershare and they have a surprisingly comprehensive multifactor procedure compared to most other websites, plus it is backed up by e-mail and postal notification of the changes. There hasn't been any change in spam that I would suggest is due to my dealings with Computershare.

    After my earlier post I logged onto my webmail to check the spam folder and found 78 recent intercepted spam messages. Many were FedEx, LinkedIn, Google message/picture updates etc, none of which I would receive legitimately.

    However, there was one sent a few weeks ago that had an element of legitimacy to it because it claimed to be from someone who had hacked my e-mail, quoting a password and appearing to be sent from my own e-mail account. It was in fact sent from an IP address in north east Africa, so I guess someone has fiddled with the e-mail header there.

    The message was essentially a demand for Bitcoins ASAP or several bad things would happen within 48 hours - locked device, deletions, personal stuff sent out to random contacts etc. etc.. It warned they'd know if I just changed the password and there was no escape from their malware etc.. I am fairly sure the password was one I had actually created, but would have used only on one UK website and at best they have my e-mail address and the quoted password. I can't even recall the url and none was mentioned, presumably so you worry more about which accounts have been compromised.

    That account the password relates to may still exist, but it's a very good argument for never recycling passwords, especially given an e-mail address is often recycled across multiple accounts with real value. Interestingly, Amazon said in August 2016 that an e-mail and password pair they thought was mine was on a list of stolen non-Amazon logins they'd encountered. Amazon had assigned a temporary password to be reset because they thought some of their customers recycled passwords and that risked allowing access to Amazon.

    I'm guessing someone hacked a website and found themselves in possession of a list of passwords, presumably not adequately protected. I think it is unlikely to go further than that, but it is an argument for using more than just e-mail + password for access to important accounts and being careful about what information is provided to even apparently secure websites.
    jo proffi and Kenfuego like this.

  7. #7
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    A few years ago Computershare sent out letters to their account holders with the account details written on the envelope. Major booboo...

  8. #8
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    Another major booboo from supposedly secure internet broker run by a major bank , we had to accept BHP buyback with a phone call to the bank broker - many ID questions , they accepted we were not rogues BUT they then cancelled our password and gave OVER the phone an interim pass word that was to be changed within 24 hours. Our accounts could have been cleaned out if it had been a rogue who had the answers to the ID questions but no password .

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