alloy corrosion
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Thread: alloy corrosion

  1. #1
    1000+ Posts Haakon's Avatar
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    Default alloy corrosion

    Does anyone know of a good product for cleaning that white fluffy corrsion that things like alloy engines, casings, brackets etc get when left exposed to the elements for a while?

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    Real cars have hydraulics DoubleChevron's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Haakon
    Does anyone know of a good product for cleaning that white fluffy corrsion that things like alloy engines, casings, brackets etc get when left exposed to the elements for a while?
    Yep,

    it's called a wire brush. You'll then have to sand it flat, polish it etc...

    I've only ever bother to just wire brush them myself. You'll probably find if you wire brush, sand flat, then use one of those POR glisten kits (where you would clear it to prevent further oxidisation) it'd probably come up like a mirror.

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  3. #3
    1000+ Posts Haakon's Avatar
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    Ha ha.... A wire brush is far too fiddly to get at all the nooks and crannys and I dont have the patience I dont want a pristine finish, just to lose the corrosion. I was hoping for an alloy "rust converter" I could spray on and wash off
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    Budding Architect ???? pugrambo's Avatar
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    go and see your local head man and ask him to either drop it in his tank with the next load he puts in or ask him for some of his wash or where he gets it from and go from there

    i'm sure alloy heads and alloy parts will clean up the same using the same stuff
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    1000+ Posts Haakon's Avatar
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    its on a good engine and trans and associated brackets thats all in perfect working order, but has sat around for a few years in the weather. Not going to dismantle for cosmetic reasons just want to clean it all up easily - there has to be something I can spray on to nuetralise the fluffy stuff
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    Budding Architect ???? pugrambo's Avatar
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    thats why i thought you could go and ask them and they might give you some or let you know where to get some and you go from there

    worth a shot
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    1000+ Posts U Turn's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Haakon
    Does anyone know of a good product for cleaning that white fluffy corrsion that things like alloy engines, casings, brackets etc get when left exposed to the elements for a while?
    That oxide layer might not look great, but it acts as hard 'shell' to prevent further corrosion of the material. I personally wouldn't touch it, because theoretically you'll be removing more and more material each time you wire brush it off.
    Take the long way home....

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    Yeah, depends on the alloy though i think...

    From the old chemistry days both Lead & Aluminium develop a thin oxide coating, which actually protects the rest of the metal. & we all know that good ol iron doesnt!

    "White Fluffy" suggests to me that its not a coating that proteting & its actually going a bit too deep for my liking, also its more than likely some type of salt & if falls off (seems likely) it may do further damage.

    i would suggest removal & then prevention...

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    Moderator Alan S's Avatar
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    CRC, used to have a product called "White rust remover" that was in a spray pack but I think it was a bit expensive.
    The guys working in it all the time use an "etch" but that's a bit harsh & at times can set off more than it removes.
    Just as a thought, try a bit of bi-carb of soda in warm water and use a paint brush to apply, leave for a while, scrub with one of those long handled brushes and wash off. The reason that may woek is that this was an old method used to wash the white rusted terminals on batteries years ago. I also find that cheap jack "Export Degreaser" can also bring alloy parts up fairly shiny on old surfaces & that may be the cheapest & easiest option.
    Phenyle on old greasy surfaces does a good job if left overnight but I can't say how well it would go on just weathered surfaces. That was an old trick we used to use when working on motorbikes and speedcars.

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  10. #10
    1000+ Posts George 1/8th's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Alan S
    CRC, used to have a product called "White rust remover" that was in a spray pack but I think it was a bit expensive.
    The guys working in it all the time use an "etch" but that's a bit harsh & at times can set off more than it removes.
    Just as a thought, try a bit of bi-carb of soda in warm water and use a paint brush to apply, leave for a while, scrub with one of those long handled brushes and wash off. The reason that may woek is that this was an old method used to wash the white rusted terminals on batteries years ago. I also find that cheap jack "Export Degreaser" can also bring alloy parts up fairly shiny on old surfaces & that may be the cheapest & easiest option.
    Phenyle on old greasy surfaces does a good job if left overnight but I can't say how well it would go on just weathered surfaces. That was an old trick we used to use when working on motorbikes and speedcars.

    Alan S
    Hi folks...I would not recommend Phenyle...that stuff really stinks. People will smell you coming from miles away.
    There's no substitute for going over it with elbow grease and a toothbrush. Ajax powder on a rag works wonders, with a small amount of water, so there's plenty of options. For the really tough spots, steel wool gets the white corrosion off usually.
    Have fun.
    Mine needs it too.
    Cheers...George.

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    Its a tricky thing to get rid of. I spoke to a carby reconditioner when we did the E-Type carbs, and the stuff they use for carbies is so powerful that you need a licence to buy it, apparently. It cost me $50 just for them to dip the castings in this stuff, but boy was it worth it in saving the elbow grease. But this is no help to you...

    ...so for the castings etc. that we were doing ourselves, we used a brilliant product called 'Alu-Brite' which is available from boat shops - I guess it's for aluminium boats. We were put on to it by a panel beater friend. You wipe this stuff on and it's like one of those silver restorer ads on TV - the alum just shines up as you wipe. Good gear.

    Stuey

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    Haakon

    Went looking for some aluminium cleaner I purchased some time back
    to get you its name, can't find it of course From memory It wasn't that great in its results, it was said to be made for use on wheels etc.

    If I find it, I will let you know. Years ago I used ordinary domestic stove cleaner to get rid of carbon gunk on old pistons. It worked very well and the
    pistons came up as if they were polished they were that clean and no effort at all. Beat scraping the carbon off..!!

    As I recall one of the stove cleaners was better than the others on the market, memory fades at to the name!! Don't know how they would go on white corrosion as the surface tends to be a bit porous when that happens.

    Any sort of strong caustic solution may work but it would have to be neutralized after use and the cleaned surface sealed. Caustic solutions can stain castings also!

    You should have plenty of old bits about to experiment on !

    Ken

  13. #13
    1000+ Posts George 1/8th's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kenfuego
    Haakon

    Went looking for some aluminium cleaner I purchased some time back
    to get you its name, can't find it of course From memory It wasn't that great in its results, it was said to be made for use on wheels etc.

    If I find it, I will let you know. Years ago I used ordinary domestic stove cleaner to get rid of carbon gunk on old pistons. It worked very well and the
    pistons came up as if they were polished they were that clean and no effort at all. Beat scraping the carbon off..!!

    As I recall one of the stove cleaners was better than the others on the market, memory fades at to the name!! Don't know how they would go on white corrosion as the surface tends to be a bit porous when that happens.

    Any sort of strong caustic solution may work but it would have to be neutralized after use and the cleaned surface sealed. Caustic solutions can stain castings also!

    You should have plenty of old bits about to experiment on !

    Ken
    God no, don't use caustic on aluminium. Caustic soda will dissolve aluminium,give off Hydrogen, and eat your hands away at the same time.
    That stuff is a no-go area. Also, if splashed into the eye there is NO remedy..it will burn through . Our bodies can stand a mild acid attack because we are slightly alkaline, but Caustic...there's no defence.
    Maybe ok for cleaning baked enamel surfaces, with gloves and goggles and respirator on...but Aluminium....forget it.
    Cheers...George.

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