So you think French car parts are expensive
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  1. #1
    Fellow Frogger!
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    Default So you think French car parts are expensive

    Been fixing an ageing 1987 Toyota Corona (don't ask). Would go for anywhere between 500m & 10km, then would totally shut down with the check engine light on. Leave it for a while, starts first time & idles perfectly. Did the paper clip trick to get the diagnostic codes, said the coil in the dizzy or the igniter was busted. This is the widget that replaces points, it's just a simple coil & magnet assembly. Given the symptoms I think the coil has an intermittent shorted turn that is temperature sensitive, the igniter assembly has semiconductors, these usually break and stay broken. Buy a new coil, I reckon its worth $20 tops.

    So far so good. Rang the local Toyota dealer to get said part. I knew I was in trouble when the parts guy asked me, seriously, if there was a paramedic handy before he told me the price. $351! Didn't matter coz they didn't have any in the country.

    That price is maybe 25% of the realisable value of the car.

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    Went to pick n payless, got a whole dizzy for $100 with a 3 month guarantee. Guess they do this coz they know they will get the whole car eventually & get to sell the parts again, so they like to keep people happy. Well, didn't fix the problem, so I'm going back tomorrow to get an igniter module in exchange for the dizzy. I think I'll give Toyota a call on Monday just to see how much they want for an igniter assembly. Should be good for a laugh.

    So, next time you buy parts remember how much worse things could be.

    Barry.

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    Toyota's highly expensive parts prices are a main factor in the company having billions of dollars in cash reserves......fancy all that dosh and they hardly ever build a decent (in terms of looks, performance and handling) car .

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    Quote Originally Posted by B E R E T
    Toyota's highly expensive parts prices are a main factor in the company having billions of dollars in cash reserves......fancy all that dosh and they hardly ever build a decent (in terms of looks, performance and handling) car .
    Thats hardly fair beretman.
    I know its a french car forum but to make that sort of blatent statement is untrue. Yes they make boring cars to you and I but they are probably more reliable than many french things at the moment ala 206's and the like with their electrical gremlins etc. And I even own a 206 now!

    ipb.

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    nJm
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    Toyota parts are ridiculously expensive. A friend of mine has a mid-90s widebody Camry which needed some kind of small rubber plug to be replaced in the engine bay. The plug costs $58.90 and will require lots of labour as they have to lift the engine to get to it!
    Nick
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    "All of its cars from the 1.1 litre 205 through the ugly duckling 309 to the 2.2 litre 505 GTi had a rightness and a righteousness about them that turned every humdrum drive into a journey. Someone, I once wrote, in the bowels of Peugeot understands handling and how a chassis should feel." - Jeremy Clarkson

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    1000+ Posts BogMaster's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by nJm
    Toyota parts are ridiculously expensive. A friend of mine has a mid-90s widebody Camry which needed some kind of small rubber plug to be replaced in the engine bay. The plug costs $58.90 and will require lots of labour as they have to lift the engine to get to it!
    I destroyed a rear shock on a brand new wide body camry on the Braidwood to Nerriga road here. I couldn't for the life of me see how there was an easy way to get at the top shock mount. The thing was off the road for a day and I don't think it was an easy or cheap fix...luckily it was a govie car.

    I think Jap vehicles tend to be built and resourced with a very limited product life in terms of the ongoing availability of spare parts. That would have something to do with protecting local industry and production through planned obsolescence .

    Woo Hoo Honi ko'u 'elemu (Hawaiian)

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    Moderator Alan S's Avatar
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    Ask anyone with a Masturbasty Pajero Quad cam the price to fit a set of spark plugs ..........then when you pick yourself up off the floor ask them the quoted number of hours (think days) to fit a cambelt; a part of routune maintenance.



    Alan S
    If it ain't broke, use a 12" shifter.....that usually does the trick!!

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    Fellow Frogger! yawood's Avatar
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    Barry, the insurance companies obviously think that Peugeots are expensive to fix; when I rang to get insurance on the 505, they told me it was listed as worth $9000 and wanted a $577 premium (that's almost twice what I pay for $23000 cover on the Falcon and nearly 2/3 of the premium for $70000 cover on the BMW - with guaranteed BMW parts). That's with a 70% no-claim bonus too!

    We agreed on a lesser premium to cover it for $5000 instead. You would have been well ahead if you had written it off instead of selling it to me (though you and I know that neither of us would ever think that way, I'll bet there are some that do).
    Bruce

    Currently owned:
    1988 505 GTi S2 Familial
    1999 E46 BMW 328Ci, 2002 Falcon AUIII Ute
    Previously owned:
    ('78-'81) 1970 504 (with the beautiful French seats)
    ('81-'89) 1977 504 (took the family on postings to Sydney, Melbourne, Perth and Canberra)
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    Part 2

    It's now fixed. It was the igniter. Cost me $165 for a second hand one & half a day chasing it from the wreckers. Even tried a tangent and looked on ebay - this is the thing that broke:

    http://cgi.ebay.com/ebaymotors/ws/eB...tem=2471423860

    Note that Toyota in the US want US$300 for it. Theres another guy who sells the schematics etc to make one yourself for $20 - gotta love americans. Seems this engine (22RE) is the engine of choice for serious pickup-heads.

    Now, the interesting bit. According to the guy I got the spare from (had to travel 70km to Campbelltown) this same unit is in Toyota Taragos up until a few years ago. They fail habitually, hence hard to find second hand. Seems other versions are bulletproof. The corona is nearly 20 years old, so how does Toyota manage to ship time bomb components for nearly 17 years? And how come people think Toyotas are so reliable?

    So, next time you are in a traffic jam caused by a no go Tarago, odds on its this that's done it.

    Barry.

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    Quote Originally Posted by yawood
    Barry, the insurance companies obviously think that Peugeots are expensive to fix; when I rang to get insurance on the 505, they told me it was listed as worth $9000 and wanted a $577 premium (that's almost twice what I pay for $23000 cover on the Falcon and nearly 2/3 of the premium for $70000 cover on the BMW - with guaranteed BMW parts). That's with a 70% no-claim bonus too!

    We agreed on a lesser premium to cover it for $5000 instead. You would have been well ahead if you had written it off instead of selling it to me (though you and I know that neither of us would ever think that way, I'll bet there are some that do).
    Bruce,

    Up until 12 months ago I had it insured for (I think) $6300. That's the number it got to after going down steadily over the years. It cost around $800 with my 22 year old daughter as a named driver, for my son it was a ridiculous amount more.

    $9000 is Glass's value. I haven't seen any 505 sell for that price for years, and the ones that got close were 92-93 wagons in mint condition.

    What I have found though is that a higher agreed value doesn't have a huge impact on the premium, but it stops the insurance company writing the car off when it could be repaired.

    You are right - it's not worth faking a write off even if your scruples let you do it. You only get to do this once, and the history will cost you dearly with every insurance premium in the future.

    Barry.

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    1000+ Posts bowie's Avatar
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    dont know if all toyota parts are that $$$$

    mate just had his water pump replaced in his 1jZ powered Soarer...

    Paied $145 from the toyota dealership .. soudns resonable enough "shurgs"

    Works: 2003 YV Commodore (That is Cecil to you)
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  11. #11
    Fellow Frogger! Filldebin's Avatar
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    Default Toycar

    I bought a '91 Toyota Corolla Wagon a few months back for about 200 bucks, there is rust in the doors and guards and sills as would be expected in Sweden. The wreckers have no good second hand panels as "the metal is too thin for up here". I welded a bit and changed a front bottom ball joint (easy as a peasy) and it is very reasonable now and roadworthied for a year.
    After having older peugeots and Renaults up here it is a bit bewildering having a car that is electronic. Even the electric door locking devices work. It has proven to be reliable and gives good economy even if a little boring. There are stranges fuses and circuit-breakers for everything.
    I realise that things might be dear for them but the car is good. We have had an Opel Kadet wagon (German built) for about 6 years with trouble free driving, so My faith in things modern has been strenghtened. and I hope to avoid any electronic problems as I fix everything myself. (Both cars are red, the opposite of green).
    My 404 awaits attention before the summer fun starts though.

  12. #12
    1000+ Posts George 1/8th's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by barryg
    Part 2

    It's now fixed. It was the igniter. Cost me $165 for a second hand one & half a day chasing it from the wreckers. Even tried a tangent and looked on ebay - this is the thing that broke:

    http://cgi.ebay.com/ebaymotors/ws/eB...tem=2471423860

    Note that Toyota in the US want US$300 for it. Theres another guy who sells the schematics etc to make one yourself for $20 - gotta love americans. Seems this engine (22RE) is the engine of choice for serious pickup-heads.

    Now, the interesting bit. According to the guy I got the spare from (had to travel 70km to Campbelltown) this same unit is in Toyota Taragos up until a few years ago. They fail habitually, hence hard to find second hand. Seems other versions are bulletproof. The corona is nearly 20 years old, so how does Toyota manage to ship time bomb components for nearly 17 years? And how come people think Toyotas are so reliable?

    So, next time you are in a traffic jam caused by a no go Tarago, odds on its this that's done it.

    Barry.
    hi Barry, and froggies, my late father in law had a similar problem with a toyota they had years ago. It turned out to be simply in need of a change of spark plugs. The story was that if you ran anything other than NGKs in it, it would stop after 10-15 minutes.
    Put in a set of NGKs...problem solved.
    It had everyone puzzled...but that's how it happened.
    Cheers...George .

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    Quote Originally Posted by George 1/8th
    hi Barry, and froggies, my late father in law had a similar problem with a toyota they had years ago. It turned out to be simply in need of a change of spark plugs. The story was that if you ran anything other than NGKs in it, it would stop after 10-15 minutes.
    Put in a set of NGKs...problem solved.
    It had everyone puzzled...but that's how it happened.
    Cheers...George .
    Thats hardly fair beretman.
    Wrong - is VERY fair. I was not disputing their reliability or durability -just saying that most of the cars they have ever made are boring and uninspiring to drive and look at. They are a company who has the resources to make something that looks great and is great to drive (with reliability of course) but they are highly cynical and won't it...

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    Fellow Frogger! mi16_weapon's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by barryg
    Been fixing an ageing 1987 Toyota Corona (don't ask).

    So far so good. Rang the local Toyota dealer to get said part. I knew I was in trouble when the parts guy asked me, seriously, if there was a paramedic handy before he told me the price. $351! Didn't matter coz they didn't have any in the country.

    That price is maybe 25% of the realisable value of the car.
    Dont blame Toyota, its a extra-special-secret-hidden-surcharge that you have to pay if you want to keep a car as ugly as a corona on the road!!
    1992 mi16
    Toyota aware driver
    there are no stupid questions, but there are a LOT of inquisitive idiots..

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    Quote Originally Posted by mi16_weapon
    Dont blame Toyota, its a extra-special-secret-hidden-surcharge that you have to pay if you want to keep a car as ugly as a corona on the road!!
    Well, it happened like this. It was cheaper to buy it than pay the additional insurance for my son to drive the Peugeot. It looks good towing a trailer full of rubbish to the tip (but not as good as a Volvo would). And it's so daggy that my son won't be tempted by the darker side of teenage motoring.

    On a serious note, the parts prices are a direct result of the way the Japanese tax cars off the road after 5 years. Thus, once a model is 5 years past it's last production, look out for parts becoming both scarce and expensive. It's not uncommon for the tools to be sold to Taiwan, and then grey market parts appear for a while as well.

    Barry.

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    Fellow Frogger! yawood's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by barryg
    On a serious note, the parts prices are a direct result of the way the Japanese tax cars off the road after 5 years. Thus, once a model is 5 years past it's last production, look out for parts becoming both scarce and expensive. It's not uncommon for the tools to be sold to Taiwan, and then grey market parts appear for a while as well.
    Barry.
    That's why its often cheaper to replace a Japanese engine than repair it. The ones that are in the cars they force off the road get brought to Australia as replacement engines (often with quite low miles). My elder son has a Mazda Astina with about 400,000 on the clock which he uses every night for work. The other day he broke a cam belt (ouch!). Cost him about $1300 for the repair - head work (luckily no damaged pistons) and the new belt - all fitted and back on the road. Quite reasonable I thought.
    Bruce

    Currently owned:
    1988 505 GTi S2 Familial
    1999 E46 BMW 328Ci, 2002 Falcon AUIII Ute
    Previously owned:
    ('78-'81) 1970 504 (with the beautiful French seats)
    ('81-'89) 1977 504 (took the family on postings to Sydney, Melbourne, Perth and Canberra)
    Brother owned:
    203,403,404,504 (each when they were current vehicles)

  17. #17
    1000+ Posts BogMaster's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by yawood
    That's why its often cheaper to replace a Japanese engine than repair it. The ones that are in the cars they force off the road get brought to Australia as replacement engines (often with quite low miles). My elder son has a Mazda Astina with about 400,000 on the clock which he uses every night for work. The other day he broke a cam belt (ouch!). Cost him about $1300 for the repair - head work (luckily no damaged pistons) and the new belt - all fitted and back on the road. Quite reasonable I thought.
    1300 spondulas is a fair whack. I had a similar problem with my son's Lada Samara. The biggest cost involved was shimming up the valve clearances $400 to replace the two bent valves (I supplied all the parts) , surface grind the head and shim the valve clearances. I ended up spending about $1400 all up and was not that pleased about it. The easiest thing would have been to locate a second hand head, have it surface ground (70 or there abouts down here) and then fitted.

    Ho hum, the things one does for the love of Mother Russia.

    Woo Hoo Honi ko'u 'elemu (Hawaiian)

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    Quote Originally Posted by BogMaster
    1300 spondulas is a fair whack. I had a similar problem with my son's Lada Samara. The biggest cost involved was shimming up the valve clearances $400 to replace the two bent valves (I supplied all the parts) , surface grind the head and shim the valve clearances. I ended up spending about $1400 all up and was not that pleased about it. The easiest thing would have been to locate a second hand head, have it surface ground (70 or there abouts down here) and then fitted.

    Ho hum, the things one does for the love of Mother Russia.

    Samara? Surprised that it is still on the road.... Was it one of those "Peter Brock" specials? Didn't Samara's lose 2/3rds of their value in the 1st year and the rest soon after?? Sorry, cynic here, never driven one but their reputation as having to rebuilt before hitting aussie roads was a bit of a worry (although the Niva was a surprising beast so I am told)!

    Regards
    Andrew

  19. #19
    1000+ Posts BogMaster's Avatar
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    Well Andrew I too was a Lada cynic,

    When I had this wanky government job a few years back I ended up eating breakfast with a fella who had owned a Lada franchise in Bega NSW. He said stuff that was a bit of a revelation, like that the biggest problem was witb quality control. He used to delegate apprentices to go over each vehicle before delivery to tighten loose bolts, remove empty Vodka bottles etc.

    Anyway he swore that Samara's regularly managed mega kms without missing a beat.

    Since having a Lada in the family I've noticed that Russians don't know Jack about making UV resistant plastic. Basically every Samara dash I have seen has been a mess of dried out and cracked polyurethane (or it's Russian equivalent).

    I have also noticed that the car is well engineered. Every time I have had to work on it, things have been easy. the exhaust disassembles because the whole thing is linked with cast iron donuts... no bashing and swearing requied. The front bearings are a piece of piss to replace etc etc....

    The hassle I've had is that I thougt I could correct the slapping of the timing belt against the plastic guard by overtightening it...oops..not happy about $1400 but my fault .......and by the pilot not really comprehending that water cooled engines need a coolant other than fresh air.

    I have to say that the Samara in all it's glory is fun to drive, could handle the worst roads, is easy to work on and cjheap if you do it yourself....

    The motors were designed by Porsche for FIAT if I have it right and are assembled by robot...the FIAT fully intergrated robotic engine (FIRE engine)

    Why do we have a Samara???

    You might well ask.... a mate of mine gave it to Bog the younger with not a lot of kms on it.

    I have this love hate relationship with it. Brilliant design and a lot of commonsense in how it's put together.... but really badly let down by the quality of the fittings...especially anything plastic from the coolant resevour to the light switches.

    Woo Hoo Honi ko'u 'elemu (Hawaiian)

  20. #20
    1000+ Posts BogMaster's Avatar
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    On the Brock front, those Brock mags are really good and I suspect could be flogged to Subaru fans..the Brock seats are as bad as the originals.

    Woo Hoo Honi ko'u 'elemu (Hawaiian)

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