h-van Marché Restaurant- paris, Marais
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Thread: h-van Marché Restaurant- paris, Marais

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    Default h-van Marché Restaurant- paris, Marais

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    OK, here's another generalization:

    The Food in France (edit this to Paris) sits at different levels.

    1 Fine Dining/Michelin star Restaurants/Relais. eg Pierre Gagniere

    2 Famous Bistros. eg Train Bleu; St Denis etc

    3 Home/slow-cooked/rustic. eg as found in some cafes and Chambre d'hotes

    4 Good Restaurant/Cafe food

    5 "Merde" ..served to Tourists...particularly in central Paris

    We have experienced all of them during our numerous visits.

    So here's a blatant "free-kick" for a Café that serves good food ( service continu ..open 7days ) in the central Paris area of "le Marais" ...where you will probably end up if you visit that fine city.
    The prices are reasonable and we have had many lunches there.
    (I have no association with the café)

    It just so happens the bloke owns a h-van that he leaves parked in the street; has a small collection of h-van models on display; and his menus and business cards are also in the shape of a h-van.

    Place is called: "Restaurant le Marché"

    Where is it? 4th Arrondissment; tucked away in.. Place du Marché Sainte Catherine.... a small "square" on rue d'Ormesson. ( between rue de Sévigné and rue de Turenne ) Not far from "Place de Vosges" ..known to every Paris visitor.
    Nearest metro: "St Paul" on ligne 1 ***

    His English is only about as good as my French but he got excited to know that I also had a "camionette" in the form of a 2cv van.

    ( ***Metro Ligne 1 has automated/driver-less trains at 1.5 - 2.0 minute intervals...seemingly always full.
    They accellerate rapidly and stop more abruptly than the driven ones. Line crosses town underground from LaDefense under Arc de Triomphe down Champs Elysee, past the Louvre; Hotel de Ville; Bastille and out to Chateau Vincennes.
    Trains are manufactured by Alstom / Bombardier. If you live in Melbourne,Australia you will ride in Alstom trains and Bombardier trams, built locally, obviously under licence ?)

    Cheers
    Bob

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    Last edited by greenfrog; 7th August 2015 at 11:07 PM. Reason: I'm talking Paris rather than France
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    can't make out the menu clearly in the pic, but looks like dishes average around the 15 Euro mark? What are you giving this one on your levels 1-5 given it's a touristy area

    curious why not just get a french stick, some cheese and vino and eat in the many wonderful parks?

    eg, from Carrefour:

    PAIN AU LAIT BIO - CARREFOUR BIO
    le sachet de 8 pain au lait, 280g
    1,98 €

    FROMAGE - BRESSE BLEU
    la portion de 250g
    3,09 €

    BORDEAUX 2008 - VIN ROSÉ
    La bouteille, 75cL
    3,81 €

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    Firstly we already do as you suggest ie. picnic with the "makings" from one of the supermarkets ( Carrefour, Monoprix, Franprix, Shopi ) etc.

    But when in Paris (for 9 weeks this time) we also go out for lunch a bit.
    Remember that Dinner is always more expensive everywhere.

    Yes this one is in a tourist area..and that's why I reckon it is OK.
    Readers here are likely to be in this area..especially if in Paris for a short time.
    Food is between 3 & 4 on my scale.
    15 euro is about normal for a main course at lunch almost anywhere. ( simple salads eg "caesar" included! )
    You can get a "menu"( special/ Plat de jour) of 2 courses for about the same ...even at cafe Marché.

    We stay at a friends apartment in Levallois-Perret ( Home of the 2cv) less than one km outside the Paris Peripherique boundary.
    No tourists there... and lunch is about the same cost....and no better quality for the locals.

    So that is my benchmark.

    I am sure people will find their own "treasures". I am just narrowing the field.

    Try eating at the famous ( Hemingway)"les Deux Magots" cafe on bvde. St Germain in the 6th Arrondissment.
    Full of (American) tourists.
    It will cost you about 12 euros+ for a "Croque Monsieur" aka toasted ham/cheese sandwich!!!!

    Cheers
    Bob

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    Our treat was croissants from a local baker with ham from supermarker for breakfast. Best croissants I have ever had. The owner did not speak English, but it was easy enough to point at the product and indicate with fingers how many
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    1000+ Posts gerry freed's Avatar
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    Paris is not France, it is New York with a giant Meccano construction.
    In the real France the locals eat at modest restaurants, often with a single menu or none at all - the dishes of the day. In the smaller villages and towns they can be found with a little local knowledge and you can get a 3 course meal + wine for 13 to 16 euros. Good unpretentous food whose quality control is assured by the local faithful and not geared to tourists whom they only see once.
    con and graham66 like this.
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    -nordstan.jpg

    Speaking of Citroen vans, in Gothenburg earlier this year, around the back of the Nordstan shopping mall, there were 3 such vans. They looked to have UK rego, but no country stickers or identifying marks, and looked to sell take-away food, but as it was raining, were not in operation.

    Or maybe they were a promo for the local radio station. I never really found out, but either way, it was certainly a disparate and incongruous sight.

    Hope that the photo attaches, I have NFI how to do it.

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    Quote Originally Posted by gerry freed View Post
    Paris is not France, it is New York with a giant Meccano construction.
    In the real France the locals eat at modest restaurants, often with a single menu or none at all - the dishes of the day. In the smaller villages and towns they can be found with a little local knowledge and you can get a 3 course meal + wine for 13 to 16 euros. Good unpretentous food whose quality control is assured by the local faithful and not geared to tourists whom they only see once.
    Totally agree.
    So I have edited post to read "Paris" rather than France...as that is what I was referring to.

    When visiting Paris, as many do ( is it 4 million annually for Paris only, or all of France??) you are likely to experience the dodgy-food syndrome if you are anywhere near a tourist attraction.

    We spend most of our time in back corners of Paris ( if there is such a thing in a circular city?) or the suburbs and often eat at "local" cafés. These are marginally cheaper (by 2-3 Euros) but the food is still often only average and I reckon that Paris cafés generally only have a limited range...with more of the same.
    It needs to be "short-order" because of numbers and cooking in kitchens smaller than an average Australian bathroom.

    The exception is in outer areas where you may get eg.Moroccan/African influence.
    Cheapest coffee is in the corner "Tabac"

    Cheers
    Bob

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