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  1. #1
    1000+ Posts gerry freed's Avatar
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    Default Get the buzz here

    I see some reference on other threads to mosquitoes and their certificates. You are way behind the times if you think that they are not a concern in Europe. Global warming is moving the tropical species north and the tiger mozzies that are the vector of chikungunya and dengue fever are in Europe now. They were first spotted in Catalonia, Spain in 2005 and have entered France via Perpignan. They have invaded Italy and Malta as well. It is a hot topic because we have recently had serious fresh water flooding in the Herault and the mozzies had an ideal breeding ground. There were three cases of Chikungunya in Montpelier reported this past week among locals who had not been travelling.

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    Contented Peugeot Driver addo's Avatar
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    That's both interesting and scary. If a tyre exporter needs to treat tyres before posting, it doesn't worry me - provided they actually do it! I would be mortified by the idea that something I'd done had brought exotic diseases to Australia.

    Hope the putzi fly isn't the next pest to settle in Europe.

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    VIP Sponsor 59 Floride's Avatar
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    ...or Cane Toads

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    1000+ Posts robmac's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by 59 Floride View Post
    ...or Cane Toads
    I'd suggest we already at least one "pond toad" here on AF already.

    Looking at some of the threads I can see breeding is possible.
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    Icon14 I guess Nature will do what it does, hope it is good to all of us.

    Well at least here in Melbourne we have already seen the cyclic effects of changing climate in Melbourne. Some years back now we noticed the first appearance of black cockroaches (said to be common in Sydney) that would come into homes, hadn't seen them before as it was said to be too cold for them to survive the Melbourne winters but , at the time you could not even buy cockroach sprays or baits in the supermarkets, now those sprays and baits are stocked in all supermarkets. Perhaps Melbourne UHI growth effect (Urban heat) played a part?

    Over the last few years the retreat of the cockroach problem has been noticeable, with the pests now rarely seen inside houses, but you can still find them occasionally outside especially under canvas/plastic tarps used to cover cars or machinery (nice warm places) but the infestations are getting smaller, perhaps they are more sensitive to climate changes and unlike some humans can pick the last 18 years of no world wide temperature warming and are busily working their way back to warmer climates - maybe even an insect harbinger of colder winters to come? I would hope not, but some climate scientists suggest the trend is towards cooler climate -mind you there is considerable hype from some quarters to claim the opposite.

    Time and nature will tell, I hope the gentle warming rate resumes,(0.8 Celsius a century up till now) but the fading prospects of a larger El Nino this year seems to be ruling that out. Locally we had a mild winter with some severe frosts and cold spells and so far as |I clean up the backyard, I am seeing less rather than more cockroaches as I pull back the tarp coverings. I'll continue to check over the summer period, I'd prefer that they don't increase here (Sydney can have them back) but I would like a hot summer too!!

    I don't dare to wish that Europe and the Northern hemisphere have a return to the crippling winters of the past, but if that helps the problem you raise Gerry, then perhaps nature will have the final say, we puny humans are at the mercy of nature and natural events just like the cockroaches it seems.

    Ken

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    Quote Originally Posted by gerry freed View Post
    Global warming is moving the tropical species north and the tiger mozzies that are the vector of chikungunya and dengue fever are in Europe now. .
    no wonder the National Front is so popular!

  7. #7
    1000+ Posts gerry freed's Avatar
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    France still has a Minister of Science, CNRS (the equivalent of CSIRO) employs 33,000 people in scientific research for the common good
    CNRS - Présentation
    Ken might care to particpate in this conference of theirs next week
    CNRS - Institut écologie et environnement - Actualités de l'institut
    The Chaire Développement Durable de Sciences Po, the Chaire Développement Durable de l'Ecole Polytechnique, Alliance Program, and Columbia Global Center Europe Paris, with the support of Sciences Po, are pleased to invite you to the inaugural conference of the cycle of lectures “Economists facing climate change” :


    Speaker: Nicholas STERN (London School of Economics, President of the British Academy)
    Discussants: Students of Columbia University and Sciences Po
    Chair: Laurent FABIUS, Minister of Foreign Affairs and International Development

    Agreements are built on shared understanding. The lecture will characterize four key elements of understanding for climate change. First, the risks from unmanaged climate change are potentially immense and delay is dangerous. Second, the path to a low-carbon growth can be one of creativity, innovation, investment and growth; growth of a better quality than we have seen until now. Third, we have to create “equitable access” to sustainable development that builds in the overcoming of poverty in developing countries and responsibility to lead in the rich countries. Fourth, the structure of an agreement must promote and be founded on collaboration rather than discouraged by “burden sharing” and allow for learning and the strengthening of ambition.

    Organizers: Dominique Bureau (Ecole polytechnique), Claude Henry (Columbia University), Alessia Lefebure (Programme Alliance), Laurence Tubiana (Sciences Po).
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    Icon11 Unfortunately mosquitors do exist and thrive in temporate zones

    Did a little research on the tiger mosquito and got to tell you Gerry they are here in Australia AND Tasmania, when you read the literature properly the mosquito can live/thrive in temperate zones as they are very adaptable to both cold and hot climates and we have those worldwide.

    They tend to hibernate in a cold winter and in some very cold environments, the extreme cold can inhibit the egg laying cycle and that tends to kill off a generation, as you correctly said the breeding is enhanced where there is plenty of standing water after good rains - removal or treatment of pooled water.and use of well known age old remedies (kerosene on pooled water?) can control and disrupt the breeding cycle.

    Note that in certain circumstances the mosquito eggs can survive for up to seven years before they hatch and of course in that hibernation period, they wait for the needed rain and pooled water.

    What is well known is that human beings get infected in tropical or sub tropical areas and then travel to more temperate locations where the tiger mosquito is breeding and disease is transmitted via those new colonies. Also certain people due to their unique scent are prone to attract and be bitten, thus rapidly spreading infection via other species, dogs, cats, etc. Only the female of the species feeds on blood.

    So most of the re-infection depends on two things a travelling infected human or animal, pooled water after periods of rain and a good breeding season and of course one mosquito can be responsible for over one billion descendants in a month

    Use of an effective personal repellent can prevent infection by way of mosquito bites, and in an extreme breeding season people can wear clothing impregnated with permethrin marketed under the name insect shield and retains its repellency through 70 washings and extremely effective for repelling all flying insects in addition to ticks and mites.

    One should be careful of attributing anything to either global warming or climate change as neither can be proven to be responsible, indeed unbiased reading, will dispel these myths, though it is convenient to try and tie these issues to evolve scary scenarios, some things happen quite naturally and a proper scientific study and yes some sceptical examination usually reveals an attractive money trail for those promoting scary myths on thin pretexts.

    There are lots of links on the internet, and here is one on the world wide spread of the Tiger Mosquito - note Australia and the European countries where they are found and cause no real problems until after good breeding ground rains, availability of a diseased carrier and another attractive juicy human to dine on.

    http://au.parakito.com/mosquito-protection-blog

    Over the last 30 years, tiger mosquitoes have spread rapidly from their native tropical forests of Asia to almost every continent in the world, making them one of the world’s most invasive species of animal. In tropical and subtropical regions, tiger mosquitoes are active all year round but, in cooler, temperate regions, they hibernate in the winter. You could say that they’re tiny but resilient!
    However, this tiny assailant poses a big risk to human health.

    In its best case, being bitten by a tiger mosquito is mildly irritating and leaves you with an itchy, red, swollen bite. However, people can suffer from severe allergic reactions including nausea, vomiting, breathing difficulties, low blood pressure and, very rarely, anaphylactic reactions. To make matters worse, tiger mosquitoes are important carriers of viral diseases such as Yellow fever, Dengue fever, Chikungunya fever and Zika virus.
    also nice list of personal and effective repellents. FAQ
    if you are worried about moving to a tiger mosquito habitat some time in the future.

    Oh and note lest you think I am covering up, C02 has a role in conjunction with mosquitos as it is a major factor in humans attracting attention by biting mosquitos, as a human breathes out (exhales) CO2, mosquito's zero in on them, so either stop breathing or put on a good repellent properly applied.

    Regards

    Ken.

  9. #9
    Contented Peugeot Driver addo's Avatar
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    ...humans attracting attention by biting mosquitos
    You'd have to be hungry - they're teensy!
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    Icon14 Big meal..small bite..

    Quote Originally Posted by addo View Post
    You'd have to be hungry - they're teensy!
    Got me!!

    Over the years I have killed quite a few of the little [email protected]@gers, kharma will get me if they don't -PS when I was the principle Bodyguard of the Prince and Princess (Dianna and Charles) during their visit, we were scouting out Rotamaru Island in Gippsland with their British bodyguards,and boy did those Australian mosquitos like new british blood!! Left us Aussies alone, but our British counterparts faces swelled up in a reaction to the bites - repellent was on standbye during the actual visit.

    Guess new Francophile blood might be a different kettle of fish... Hopefully.


    Ken

  11. #11
    1000+ Posts Kim Luck's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kenfuego View Post
    Got me!!

    Over the years I have killed quite a few of the little [email protected]@gers, kharma will get me if they don't -PS when I was the principle Bodyguard of the Prince and Princess (Dianna and Charles) during their visit, we were scouting out Rotamaru Island in Gippsland with their British bodyguards,and boy did those Australian mosquitos like new british blood!! Left us Aussies alone, but our British counterparts faces swelled up in a reaction to the bites - repellent was on standbye during the actual visit.

    Guess new Francophile blood might be a different kettle of fish... Hopefully.


    Ken
    Y'all just need one of these: Mosquito Magnet clears an acre
    Don't it always seem to go that you don't know what you've got 'til it's gone............

  12. #12
    1000+ Posts gerry freed's Avatar
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    I raised this subject because increasing numbers of AF readers are visiting the south of France, there being a Citroën collection there and other attractions. It would be unwise and perhaps painful to treat the mozzies as a joke.
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    Icon14 Good thougts Gerry.

    Quote Originally Posted by gerry freed View Post
    I raised this subject because increasing numbers of AF readers are visiting the south of France, there being a Citroën collection there and other attractions. It would be unwise and perhaps painful to treat the mozzies as a joke.
    Same here of course Gerry, it only takes one person to evade the health quarantine restrictions and bring in the infection (Ebola or other mosquito borne diseases) and be bitten by one of our tiger mosquitos, to add to our already impressive list of similar nasties carried by our mosquitos.

    That is why it is so important to have screening of passengers who fly in to our airports after being in active areas where the disease(s) are known to be endemic. No screening system will be perfect and accepted by every traveller unfortunately.

    And of course it is not only human carriers that bring in viruses, in some cases infected migrating birds, or the migratory tropical bats can carry in a disease that can remain dormant in other species including humans to await whatever conditions/weather that breaks that dormant phase.

    We are probably lucky to have some of our human species that have developed immunity to several nasty viruses and that helps in checking the spread sometimes, but not always.

    I would be very careful with children and elderly who have never come into contact with "Murray River Ecephalitis" (Ross River virus) visiting those areas in Northern Victoria and insist on them wearing a good mosquito repellent and appropriate clothing, having seen how those Brit protection guys reacted to simple mosquito bites. No joke if such a simple thing brings on a more serious illness.

    I bet the tourist authorities in France, play down the ":scares" lest there is a drop off of tourists, just like our tourist authorities. Mind you if you use a decent repellent regularly applied it is unlikely you will be attacked by mosquitos or to need to don a mosquito net whilst visiting - the drop bears tend to tear those off in our bush!!

    Ken

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