Peugeot Considerations
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Thread: Peugeot Considerations

  1. #1
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    Default Peugeot Considerations

    Newb here

    Lets face it we love the 308. It looks great, drives well and the panaromic roof..

    Unfortunately, too many naysayers. We are traditionally Toyota and Mazda drivers so for us it is a big risk. My last car was a Mazda 323 which lasted 15 years from showroom to write off. Changed the alt and aircon belts just once, tyres twice, 120K and the regular service. It was great to drive and got me from A to B.

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    If I would have my way I would replace it by a Mazda 3 but my other half is leaning towards the Peugeot (I think it is the roof).

    Our budget is $15K so it will be second hand cars only.

    Can these cars be as reliable as the Japanese? Is there anything in particular we need to watch for when buying second hand? Which would be the best 308 series to buy? Diesel or Petrol?

    Any advice welcome.

  2. #2
    Veni Vidi Posti 68 404's Avatar
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    One and a half million + people seem to think they're ok since 2007. New model has just won a truckload of awards.

    Dave
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    IR655
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    Yes those are compelling reasons. Here is Australia they are not popular and the lack of local support / qualified mechanics worries me.

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    Contented Peugeot Driver addo's Avatar
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    If you are inclined to worry, then don't buy one - you'll only find reasons to be unhappy with your choice.

    As to the petrol vs diesel debate, we seem to be behind the eight-ball as usual for Australia, viz: "Diesel is so European; it must be the way to go" - when in reality the European emissions regs are taking nearly everyone back to petrol engines with far more thoroughly engineered architecture than in the past. Engines such as the 1.6 diesel shared among various makers including Ford and Peugeot, showed signs of being rushed prematurely to market in an effort to comply with these requirements, and the customer carried the can (without appropriate manufacturer or dealer support).


    Additional remark 1 follows...

    As a gross generalisation, a forum like this is going to more predominantly include models slightly older than the 308, such as the 307 or 206. I'd surmise the newer models are perhaps more frequently in the hands of people who just wear the cost of fixing something - rather than searching out further opinions.

    Additional remark 2...

    While the Mazda may have been a shining pinnacle to you, an inspection towards the end of its life may have revealed creeping wear/imminent failure on any number of other items than the ones you explicitly mention. It would be hard to claim the car was otherwise as new; this raises your expectations unreasonably high.

    Additional remark 3...

    Agree with Dave on warranties, better to make sure whoever services the car knows their stuff and will work with you on a program of regular visits and avoid reactive repairs. Don't be afraid to shop overseas if a local supplier is too dear, too slow, unhelpful - or seek technical support on a forum for DIY moments.

    Final comments

    Peugeot/CitroŽn are inclined to make soft and slightly fragile suspension bushings compared to local vehicles. It's a definite shortcoming. They also have a bad history of slightly marginal electrics; phantom faults and small to larger niggles are well documented over more than 25 years. This is highly unlikely to stop you in your tracks, but (plucked out of the sky) a dash backlight that pulsates when you reverse, is the sort of niggle I mean. With all this in mind, if you still want to go Pug - haggle hard.
    Last edited by addo; 9th September 2014 at 08:34 PM.
    french-car-newb and Alain like this.

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    Veni Vidi Posti 68 404's Avatar
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    We bought Addo second hand and without the extra warranty and he turned out ok.

    Dave
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  6. #6
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    A lot of the French cars around here are well over 15 years old.

    Re the Mazda 3, in many ways it's a Ford Focus - see Ford C1 platform - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. My point is that car manufacture has become an international thing, as Gerry Freed keeps reminding us.

    Look at Renault - Nissan, or the diesel engines in many makes all quietly coming from Peugeot-Citroen plants with a different badge on the cover. Most "Japanese" cars here are made in Thailand, not Japan. Most engine, electrical, and brake components in newer Pugs come from German multinational manufacturers. You'll even find bits from American firms like Delphi (spun off GM) and Visteon (child of Ford) in French cars.

    I once compared costs over 12 years between a Peugeot 405 and a Subaru. The Pug had the greater mileage (guess why). Servicing costs matched, though the labour was mostly by me. Repairs sent out to workshops were also much the same in $ terms but for different things - the French car still had original drive shafts for example. The Japanese bodywork/interior held up better. I always avoided the dealer service departments and used independent mechanics.

    The motoring journalists mostly preach hooey. Few seem to have any idea where the systems on cars they love or hate come from.

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    Default Peugeot Considerations

    Quote Originally Posted by french-car-newb View Post
    Yes those are compelling reasons. Here is Australia they are not popular and the lack of local support / qualified mechanics worries me.
    A lot of people aren't attracted to the visual style of the 308, and I think that may be partly the reason for a drop in sales (yes, there's others like economy downturns). But if you like it, then go for it.
    I have driven the diesel version and was suitably impressed. When comparing purchase cost, weigh up the difference between petrol and diesel against anticipated distance travelled in a year. If you don't do long distances, maybe petrol is worth a closer look.
    1998 Peugeot 406 D8SV Manual
    1999 Peugeot 406 D8ST Auto
    2002 Peugeot 406 D9SV Manual
    1994 Peuegot 306 N3 Cabriolet Manual
    1994 Peugeot 306 XR N3 Hatch
    1995 Peugeot 505 GTI executive
    1976 Peugeot 504 Sedan - Now sold

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