Making it safer for motorcyclists - Victoria, changes to be phased in.
  • Help
Page 1 of 2 12 Last
Results 1 to 25 of 32
Like Tree11Likes

Thread: Making it safer for motorcyclists - Victoria, changes to be phased in.

  1. #1
    1000+ Posts
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    Melbourne Victoria
    Posts
    12,613

    Icon7 Making it safer for motorcyclists - Victoria, changes to be phased in.

    For those that both own cars and ride motor cycles now or intend to ride in the future, Victoria is making a change in licensing and regulation -

    Advertisement


    A safer start on the roads for motorcyclists - TAC - Transport Accident Commission

    01 May 2014


    Victorian motorcycle riders will have a safer start on the roads, with the phasing in of the new Graduated Licensing System (GLS) to be introduced from October, Minister for Roads Terry Mulder announced today.

    Mr Mulder said this important new program includes improved training, education and testing, as well as conditions to ensure newly licensed motorcyclists are better prepared and less likely to be injured in crashes.

    “The motorcycle GLS is being introduced in two stages over the next 18 months to help make new riders, safer. It follows extensive consultation with rider groups and road safety experts,” Mr Mulder said.

    “We’ve had great results with the GLS reducing road trauma among new car drivers and we want to extend these safety outcomes to motorcyclists as well.

    “The system will gradually remove restrictions to manage their risk as they gain the experience for them to become safer road users.”

    The new motorcycle GLS will include:

    Restricted Licence Phase:
    •ride with headlight on at all times
    •no mobile phone use
    •no towing
    •can only ride an automatic motorcycle if tested in an automatic motorcycle
    •compulsory carriage of licence

    retaining current requirements:
    •must only ride a learner approved motorcycle
    •zero BAC
    •no pillion passenger

    The duration for the conditions will be increased from the current 1 year to 3 years.

    Learner phase:
    •ride with headlight on at all times
    •wear a high visibility vest or jacket whilst riding
    •can only ride an automatic motorcycle if tested in an automatic motorcycle

    retaining current requirements:
    •must only ride a learner approved motorcycle
    •zero BAC
    •no pillion passenger
    •no mobile phone use
    •no towing
    •must display L plates
    •compulsory carriage of permit
    Plus some other points see the website for details.

    Ken

  2. #2
    Banned
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    sydney, australia
    Posts
    11,301

    Default

    good luck to Da Man trying to work out if a motorcyclists is using a cell phone! (which i take to mean no hands-free use). you cant see the phone, you cant see the hands free earpiece and you usually cant even see their face, or even their mouth, even when the visor is up.

    it'll take more than a camera on a 3m pole to get around those impediments...

  3. #3
    Member Freddie's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2002
    Location
    Torquay, Victoria
    Posts
    72

    Default

    Doesn't the headlight come on automatically anyway (been a design rule for quite awhile?) - my bike certainly does

  4. #4
    Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    Tecoma, VIC
    Posts
    101

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Freddie View Post
    Doesn't the headlight come on automatically anyway (been a design rule for quite awhile?) - my bike certainly does
    That rule was only in force for a short time and then withdrawn.
    Just happens that many bikes come that way.

    Those new learner rules don't really seem to add much in a practical sense.

  5. #5
    1000+ Posts Kim Luck's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    Melbourne, Aus.
    Posts
    18,563

    Default

    The only thing that will ever make motorcycles safer is to equip them with a minimum of four wheels and a steel cage around the occupant/s.
    Don't it always seem to go that you don't know what you've got 'til it's gone............

  6. #6
    1000+ Posts michaelr's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Sydney
    Posts
    1,393

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by StephenH View Post
    That rule was only in force for a short time and then withdrawn.
    Just happens that many bikes come that way.

    Those new learner rules don't really seem to add much in a practical sense.
    Sad that the headlight-on regulation was dropped... most of the world is moving to a scheme with every vehicle having daytime running lights.

    What did catch my eye (!) in those new rules was the requirement "•wear a high visibility vest or jacket whilst riding".

    That seems to be a well worth while idea. The riders who dress in all in black, often teamed with a trendy matt black helmet, are asking for trouble.

    I recently bought a motorcycle jacket in a shop that only offered me black... I bought a bright red one with reflective white stripes from the "womens" range. I want to be seen!
    Michael
    Member, Citroen Car Club NSW

    DS23 Pallas 5 sp. "Francoise" , BX19TRi Auto "Jacques Dutronc" , Teardrop Trailer "The Toad", BMW R65 "Rosamund"
    In the past: Renault 750, Dauphine, R4, R8, R10, Peugeot 504 Familiale, ID 19 (x2), Safari (x2)

  7. #7
    1000+ Posts schlitzaugen's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    loneliness capital of the world
    Posts
    9,320

    Default

    I haven't seen the statistics, but I would hazard a guess most biker casualties are due to careless drivers who don't check their mirrors.
    ACHTUNG ALLES LOOKENPEEPERS

    Das computermachine is nicht fur gefingerpoken und mittengrabben. Ist easy schnappen der springenwerk, blowenfusen und poppencorken mit spitssparken. Ist nicht fur gewerken bei das dummkopfen. Das rubbernecken sightseeren keepen hands in das pockets-relaxen und watch das blinkenlights.

  8. #8
    1000+ Posts FIVEDOOR's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    Brisbane Qld
    Posts
    21,054

    Default

    Some interesting stats to shed some light on the issue of mc safety

    43% of crashes occur on weekends - suggesting recreational riding
    58% of crashes the other vehicle is at fault
    Younger riders are more at risk
    risk taking is another cause of statistics - not wearing helmet/drinking/drugs/speeding

    None of it is rocket science. Decent safety gear and defensive riding goes a long way and if one still cant keep the sunny side up and greasy side down, be smart enough to give the bikes a miss.

    http://www.carrsq.qut.edu.au/publica..._safety_fs.pdf
    Any day I wake up and don't have to go to work, is a good day
    Every day is a good day

  9. #9
    the famous 18E pug206gti's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    lost
    Posts
    11,055

    Icon6

    Quote Originally Posted by Kim Luck View Post
    The only thing that will ever make motorcycles safer is to equip them with a minimum of four wheels and a steel cage around the occupant/s.
    G'day,

    OR, have every one ride a bike for a year before obtaining a car licence.
    regards,
    Les W.


    206 GTi 180
    the stealth Pug
    Did I do anything last night that suggested I was sane?








  10. #10
    1000+ Posts Kim Luck's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    Melbourne, Aus.
    Posts
    18,563

    Default

    I did get a motorbike licence in NSW about the same time as I got my Vic car licence. Well, a little afterwards. I came to grief on a small commuter bike doing some serious damage to one arm in a 58% other party was wrong collision. I continued riding after my bike and my arm were repaired, and the for some unfathomable reason at two AM on the way home from visiting the love of my life in the middle of winter decided I'd had enough of being cold and wet and the target of 58% of the car driving populace.
    Don't it always seem to go that you don't know what you've got 'til it's gone............

  11. #11
    1000+ Posts robmac's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Melbourne / Caulfield
    Posts
    19,218

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Kim Luck View Post
    I did get a motorbike licence in NSW about the same time as I got my Vic car licence. Well, a little afterwards. I came to grief on a small commuter bike doing some serious damage to one arm in a 58% other party was wrong collision. I continued riding after my bike and my arm were repaired, and the for some unfathomable reason at two AM on the way home from visiting the love of my life in the middle of winter decided I'd had enough of being cold and wet and the target of 58% of the car driving populace.
    I had a bike "licence" at 17 year 9 months.

    Shortly after getting my car licence, I was in my 203 driving along Hoddle street. A car ran a red light and cleaned up a bike rider and pillion passenger on the corner of Langridge Street.

    A few drivers , including me stopped and tried to assist, we needn't have bothered both riders were mince meat. I was physically ill.

    I did some serious thinking over the next few hours. I concluded that cars will always win. There are more cars than bikes.

    I'e never ridden a bike on the road since.

  12. #12
    Fellow Frogger! lozenge's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    Castlemaine
    Posts
    493

    Default

    I was a passionate and mindful motorcyclist for 16 years, covering a lot of miles
    in all sorts of weather. then intuition told me I was running out of luck so I stopped.
    someone I know recently decided to start riding again and bought a Honda Fireblade.
    at the age of 50 how on earth does he think he has the skills to ride something with
    a power to weight ratio (rider aboard) of well over 500 bhp per ton?
    there are more bikes on the road now than when I was riding but I never see them.
    track days and weekend burnups are fine but if you're not riding every day you'll never
    develop the necessary survival skills. and even then, you still need luck.
    but I do miss it...
    Last edited by lozenge; 15th May 2014 at 11:30 PM.

  13. #13
    Veni Vidi Posti 68 404's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    Rome
    Posts
    2,660

    Default

    I ride every day. Someone tries to do something stupid every day. I just take my time, trust no one, and try and find problems and then avoid them.

    Been riding for more than 35 years now...

    Dave
    2008 Renault Laguna 2.0 dCi break
    ​1997 BMW K1200RS

    IR655
    (George Bush Snr): "I'll never apologize for the United States of America. Ever, I don't care what the facts are."


  14. #14
    Contented Peugeot Driver addo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    Don't remind me!
    Posts
    16,609

    Default

    I still get mad when I see bike riders who are behaving like idjits.

    But I love to give it to the "tyre warmers" who treat their road space like they're heating the rubber prior to a GP start, by mimicking their behaviour in my car...

  15. #15
    1000+ Posts
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    Melbourne Victoria
    Posts
    12,613

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by FIVEDOOR View Post
    Some interesting stats to shed some light on the issue of mc safety

    43% of crashes occur on weekends - suggesting recreational riding
    58% of crashes the other vehicle is at fault
    Younger riders are more at risk
    risk taking is another cause of statistics - not wearing helmet/drinking/drugs/speeding

    None of it is rocket science. Decent safety gear and defensive riding goes a long way and if one still cant keep the sunny side up and greasy side down, be smart enough to give the bikes a miss.

    http://www.carrsq.qut.edu.au/publica..._safety_fs.pdf
    Those stats have been very similar for quite a few years, despite campaigns, warning signs on some of the nice twisty roads, best I could work out was that it is urban riders heading out for a weekend ride, and many not too experienced with different cambers, road surfaces and weather conditions and of course the odd ones who cut corners in an exhilarating ride, and collide head on with large Four wheel drives driven by drivers also enjoying a spin in the country. lot of emphasis on wearing good protective gloves, leathers and of course the helmet and that is helping with those who survive the initial impact.

    having had a few mates and colleagues who have had serious injuries while avoiding blind motorists in the urban jungle, I decided long ago not to use my motor cycle licence and in any case if I did I would probably take a revision course at Honda just to update the defensive riding skills one needs to even hope to survive,!!

    My guess is that the risk takers do qualify as "temporary Australians" as they were popularly called years back

    Ken

  16. #16
    1000+ Posts Kim Luck's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    Melbourne, Aus.
    Posts
    18,563

    Default

    Some years ago the Black's Spur Rd between Healesville and Narbethong was closed for almost all of the day due to an accident involving a motorcyclist and a 4WD. Turns out that an over-exuberant motorcyclist, whilst keeping his wheels on the right side of the dotted line managed to remove his head from his shoulders by leaning over a fair bit and enough for his neck to make contact with the closest part of a bullbar coming in the opposite direction which was also on the correct side of the road, instantly decapitating himself. The road was closed for a long time whilst the Coppers, SES etc looked for a head in a helmet.
    Don't it always seem to go that you don't know what you've got 'til it's gone............

  17. #17
    1000+ Posts schlitzaugen's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    loneliness capital of the world
    Posts
    9,320

    Default

    So, are they gonna have hi-vis vests for bullbars now or what?!
    ACHTUNG ALLES LOOKENPEEPERS

    Das computermachine is nicht fur gefingerpoken und mittengrabben. Ist easy schnappen der springenwerk, blowenfusen und poppencorken mit spitssparken. Ist nicht fur gewerken bei das dummkopfen. Das rubbernecken sightseeren keepen hands in das pockets-relaxen und watch das blinkenlights.

  18. #18
    Banned
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    sydney, australia
    Posts
    11,301

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by FIVEDOOR View Post
    Some interesting stats to shed some light on the issue of mc safety


    l]
    just some idle thoughts about these numbers

    43% of crashes occur on weekends - suggesting recreational riding
    *quite likely so, but if there is 10x as many people riding on the weekends (hypothetically), then it would imply it is safer than riding during the week. so it is hard to interpret this number.

    58% of crashes the other vehicle is at fault
    *Which isnt hugely different to saying 'roughly equally at fault', as one might expect
    *it would seem to exclude crashes where the bike is the only vehicle, and intuitively i would think that is the vast majority of them. especially the 43% occurring on the weekend!

    Younger riders are more at risk
    *as with everything... just watch a bit of youTube to see what young men do on bikes, cars, skidoos, skateboards, pogo sticks, firecrackers, guns, skis and so on.

    risk taking is another cause of statistics - not wearing helmet/drinking/drugs/speeding
    *i would imagine these factors barely apply to the 57% of accidents occurring during the week, and a very small portion of those on the weekend.

    --------------------------------------
    my personal experience: i find car drivers in australia to be very sensible and courteous. remarkably i never have problems with car drivers. i see a lot of bike riders taking risks i never would, and notably riding faster than most of the traffic. even where the 'other vehicle' was deemed to be at fault, i would think that is usually due to not seeing a much smaller vehicle which chose to not be seen.
    conclusion: motor bikes are overwhelmingly at fault for their prangs.

    my riding experience is limited: a bike as sole transport but only for a year and quite a few years back. in that year, i did not have a single near miss or problem with a car.
    conclusion: motor bikes are overwhelmingly at fault for their prangs.

  19. #19
    1000+ Posts Goddess fan's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2013
    Location
    Tasmania
    Posts
    1,452

    Default

    Motorcyclists are "overwhelmingly at fault" simply because they are there, not generally because they are young/old inexperienced speeding hoons. In the event of a collision, of course the much lighter and more exposed bike and rider/s are going to be hurt.
    My 40+ years of all sorts of motorbike riding was and is survived by (as someone said earlier) trusting no-one on the road and keeping alert. I've been smashed into, as if I didn't exist, by cars who "just didn't see me". I've even had an unmarked cop car do a right hand turn against my apparently invisible lights-on Harley. Then he gave chase, and was planning on booking me for speeding! However, riding an all white bike, with matching helmet and panniers, makes one very visible it would seem. I've had little old ladies look me in the eye, and then proceed through the intersection as if they want to wear me for an ornament. Young turks in 4WD's, same thing; but just a bit quicker.
    On a bike, I generally stay in front, keep me eyes and ears open, and be ready to react.
    Riding push bikes is deadly fun these days too, and these people suffer the same invisibility as their smokey cousins. The invisibility of "lighter mass of you = no consequences for me". It's just human nature, and we see it every day. Big is better, and bugger you Jack sort of subliminal behaviour.
    I've done it too; not seen the bike as I should have. I've done it with dirty brown and green cars also. All my fault, as I wasn't being careful; driving "on automatic", or in a false sense of "hurry-up". Luckily, not made contact; but only thanks to rapidly applying the middle pedal.
    When we all have to conform to some sort of dull orange Commodore driving pillow-case sort of existence, just to minimise risk, that will be a sad day.

    Last edited by Goddess fan; 16th May 2014 at 01:51 PM.

  20. #20
    1000+ Posts robmac's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Melbourne / Caulfield
    Posts
    19,218

    Default

    When we all have to conform to some sort of dull orange Commodore driving pillow-case sort of existence, just to minimise risk, that will be a sad day.
    I note you are in Tassie. Quite a different traffic environment to Melbourne.

    If not a matter "pillow case existence" it was a personal, commonsense decision.

  21. #21
    Fellow Frogger! WhiteKnightGTI's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Location
    Sydney
    Posts
    148

    Default

    From my experience, it's not a case of choosing not to be seen, it's those careless drivers who think they have enough room to slip in front of us, change lanes completely without checking mirrors or blind spots, and tailgate us. We are taught to ride with full attention 100% of the time, and make ourselves visible by scanning, keeping out of blind spots and moving across our lane. In saying this, we can only do so much when we're surrounded by careless people. This is even reflected by the amount of motorbikes that get knocked over by people parking and never leaving their details (has happened to many of my mates).
    Most motorists just don't give a shit about us. And they won't for a long time until there are plenty more riders on the road.
    1990 205 GTI

  22. #22
    1000+ Posts Kim Luck's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    Melbourne, Aus.
    Posts
    18,563

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by WhiteKnightGTI View Post
    From my experience, it's not a case of choosing not to be seen, it's those careless drivers who think they have enough room to slip in front of us, change lanes completely without checking mirrors or blind spots, and tailgate us. We are taught to ride with full attention 100% of the time, and make ourselves visible by scanning, keeping out of blind spots and moving across our lane. In saying this, we can only do so much when we're surrounded by careless people. This is even reflected by the amount of motorbikes that get knocked over by people parking and never leaving their details (has happened to many of my mates).
    Most motorists just don't give a shit about us. And they won't for a long time until there are plenty more riders on the road.
    Yup, its's a serious issue with the fault apportioned almost 50-50 between drivers and riders......
    Don't it always seem to go that you don't know what you've got 'til it's gone............

  23. #23
    VIP Sponsor 59 Floride's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    It's how I roll...Brisbane
    Posts
    33,955

    Default

    You tend to be very alert riding bikes in traffic, else you probably won't survive. Out on the open/winding roads it's all up to you..
    Every day when I wake up I reach up in the darkness with my eyes shut and if I cannot feel anything that resembles a wooden lid I know it will be a good day. No lid today.

  24. #24
    1000+ Posts FIVEDOOR's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    Brisbane Qld
    Posts
    21,054

    Default

    Whoever is at fault does not take into account who is more at risk. The article I cited further states 80% of the reported motorcycle crashes result in injury for motorcyclists, in cars the percentage is 20%. Consequences of an accident are always likely to be more serious for a motorcyclist.

    Being a safe and aware rider improves the odds, it does not guarantee safety. I had a boss who had spent a lifetime commuting on a motorcycle with an excellent safety record, only to be stationary in a line of traffic, with a stationary car behind him getting hit by inattentive driver resulting in the car behind him getting pushed and involving him in the accident resulting in long term back issues.

    Modern cars with highly racked and thick a pillars are terrible to visibility, all for the sake of a rollover safety, wonder how many casualties they cause
    Any day I wake up and don't have to go to work, is a good day
    Every day is a good day

  25. #25
    Member SmoothFlow's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2013
    Location
    Orange
    Posts
    101

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by pug206gti View Post
    G'day,

    OR, have every one ride a bike for a year before obtaining a car licence.

    I'll second that.
    1970 D Super. (Little Miss Petite).

    To quote Maxwell Smart........"And Loving It!"

Page 1 of 2 12 Last

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •