Bleeding Brakes - general
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  1. #1
    1000+ Posts
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    Default Bleeding Brakes - general

    Hi all,

    Ray's saga just reminded me...

    Yesterday I made a pressure brake bleeder up, the type that pressurises the master cylinder and keeps the fluid topped up as it goes. It's basically a much better quality version of the Gunson's Eezibleed, but you pressurise the main container with a good bike pump rather than using a spare tyre. I used an old 1 litre aluminium stove top cappuccino maker as the pressure vessel.

    This method is good because it prevents the master cylinder pistons and seals moving out of their normal range, as they would if you pump them once a year through their full range only when renewing fluid or bleeding.

    I've seen various opinons on what pressure to use ranging between 10 and 25 psi. I know I can just try it, but has anyone used pressure bleeding gear, and if so, what pressure is best? I was just going to use 10 psi to save any accidents and reduce the chance of cavitation in the fluid, but any opinions would be great.

    Stuey

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  2. #2
    1000+ Posts alan moore's Avatar
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    Default

    I have made one using a standing bike pump, and have gone to 20 PSI at times on a plastic reservoir, but 10 would be much safer, and the fluid still comes out of the bleeder at a fair rate anyway.
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  3. #3
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    Default

    Thanks Alan, thats what I thought. As long as 10psi is enough, that's as far as I'll go.

    In this one, the coffee machine is a 1 litre cast aluminium chamber that holds the new fluid under pressure, with a fluid pipe immersed in the fluid and going out through brass connections on the top to a modified master cylinder cap, all sealed against pressure. I made up a flange holding a standard metal car valve stem on the side of the pressure chamber. When you pump it up, fluid will flow into the master cylinder at the same rate it comes out the bleed screw, hopefully eliminating the possibility of the master cylinder emptying...that's the theory anyway - I'm changing a wheel cylinder next week for its first test.

    Stuey

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