metal polishing
  • Register
  • Help
Results 1 to 5 of 5

Thread: metal polishing

  1. #1
    Fellow Frogger! MR604's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2002
    Location
    Bathurst
    Posts
    946

    Icon5 metal polishing

    I'm looking at learning at how to polish metal, not only for doing car parts, but also becuase I shoot blackpowder muzzloading rifles and the skill could come in handy.

    What I would like to know is if anyone on here does or has tried to do their own metal polishing. I would like to know how difficult/time consuming it is and wheather it's cost effective doing it yourself?

    Any advice or comments are welcome



    Andrew

    Advertisement
    A computer lets you make more mistakes faster than any other invention in human history, with the possible exception of handguns and tequila. - Mitch Radcliffe

  2. #2
    Fellow Frogger! lucin's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2003
    Location
    inner E melbourne
    Posts
    453

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by 2 pugs
    I'm looking at learning at how to polish metal, not only for doing car parts, but also becuase I shoot blackpowder muzzloading rifles and the skill could come in handy.

    What I would like to know is if anyone on here does or has tried to do their own metal polishing. I would like to know how difficult/time consuming it is and wheather it's cost effective doing it yourself?

    Any advice or comments are welcome



    Andrew

    I've done some metal polishing (on a small scale) on mostly gold alloys. Start mainly with fine stones, then moving onto various grades of rubbers and finishing with cloths and polishing pastes. You can get the motors from places like bunnings (not sure of price though - perhaps $100-200?). It's not too difficult and the amount of time it takes really depends on how nice a finish you want, or how big the piece of metal is.

    Hope that helps.

    Luan
    Then - 2001 206 Gti
    Now - 2000 306 Gti6
    Now - 1974 GS 1220 Club

  3. #3
    1000+ Posts Pugnut403's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    Tasmania
    Posts
    1,419

    Default

    I've done a bit of metal polishing, and my father used to be a jewelery manufacturer a bit over 20 years ago.

    On rough cast aluminium, start with coarse grit paper of coarse files. You can make sure a surface is flat by wrapping the paper around a file. If you use a file, clean it with a file card every few strokes or it will pick up chips which will leave big scratches in the piece.
    Follow through the grades, up to 1200 grit or so. Use a file or sanding block to back the paper. If starting with diecast alloy you start at 320 grit or even finer but with rough cast you can start as low as 60.
    After you go through the grades you have 2 choices. You can buy a mandrel and mop for your bench grinder from a hardware shop for $40 or so and a stick of compound for about $10 and finish it that way. Or you can get a abrasive polish like Autosol and get the sandpaper scratches out. This will leave the alloy looking cloudy so youthen get a special aluminium polish which is much less abrasive or not abrasive at all such as Autosol Fine or something like that and go for your life. I hope you also get a big tin of elbow grease too.
    If you use the polishing wheel be careful on flat surfaces as it is easy to round over the edges or dish the edges of holes, which looks crap.

    On steel you can do it the same way as the aluminium but you will need a bigger tin of elbow grease to do it by hand. You also usually can start with a fairly fine grade of paper, and as mentioned above you can start with grinding stones. Don't try this on alloy though, as it will load up the stone permanently.

    For barrels you can start with a small stone or fine emery paper around a fine file and go lengthwise trying to go around evenly and not facet the barrel too much, followed by strips of emery paper or even better emery cloth used like a shoeshine cloth which will get rid of any tiny facets there might be.
    Use the finest grade you can get away with. For firearm actions where there are flat bits use the paper around a file trick or very fine flat stones. The type you get from the hardware store for sharpening knives etc will be a bit rough for what you want, try and get an arkansas stone or similar.

    P.S., What type of black powder rifle do you shoot? I have never shot black powder, but I was the secretary of a target club for 2 years and deputy Rifle Captain for one.
    Pugs Rule!

    403, now sold
    404, project
    2010 Mitsubishi i MiEV electric car

  4. #4
    Fellow Frogger! MR604's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2002
    Location
    Bathurst
    Posts
    946

    Default

    Thanks for the replies. I've got a knife scabbard that I'm going to do first, so that if it's a bit rough its not going to matter. It would be nice to do some parts on rifles like trigger guards, but plates etc.
    I also might try it on a few car bits if I get real adventurous.

    I shoot caplock rifles. A few members of the club I'm in also shoot flintlock rifles . Black powder rifles are a real hoot with the smoke and noise. The best rifle I have ever shot was a .75 cal smoothboore flintlock.


    Andrew
    A computer lets you make more mistakes faster than any other invention in human history, with the possible exception of handguns and tequila. - Mitch Radcliffe

  5. #5
    1000+ Posts HONG KONG PUGGY's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2002
    Location
    Yarrabilba, Queensland
    Posts
    2,756

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by 2 pugs
    Thanks for the replies. I've got a knife scabbard that I'm going to do first, so that if it's a bit rough its not going to matter. It would be nice to do some parts on rifles like trigger guards, but plates etc.
    I also might try it on a few car bits if I get real adventurous.

    I shoot caplock rifles. A few members of the club I'm in also shoot flintlock rifles . Black powder rifles are a real hoot with the smoke and noise. The best rifle I have ever shot was a .75 cal smoothboore flintlock.


    Andrew
    Andrew,
    Hi . I have had a fair bit of time spent polishing metals. Mainly gold/paladium based alloys and chrome/cobalt alloys used in dentistry.
    The process can be as long or short as you wish.
    The best place to start if possible would be with a bead/sand blasting of some sort. There are a few places around that will do the blasting required, on small to large scale. I have for the engine in my R10 polished or left sand-blast finished a few things. Reno's have lovely brass temp oil and water senders on older engines, they look great high polished.
    We(dental thecnicians) use a fair few different grades of diamond and sansstone cutters, then "rubber"polishers (grit impregnated) and then onto felt cones and wheels with varying polishes.
    I noticed that Bunnings have these polishes for sale in the power tool section.
    Try one of the Dremmel type motors, but do not run it at the high speed they say the points/wheels can be spun at, those ones are not graet quality and relly self-destruct when going fast.

    Hope this helps,

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •