Retirement came easy.
  • Help
Results 1 to 22 of 22
  1. #1
    1000+ Posts Fordman's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Location
    Perth/West Australia
    Posts
    1,531

    Default Retirement came easy.

    I had been toying with retirement for a year or two, but it came easy with a nasty little "tip over the edge" by company management, and I gave notice of retirement the next day, after 17 years with the company. That was 5 weeks ago, and I am now enjoying my first week of semi-freedom after nearly 47 years at the coalface. I am calling it semi-retirement because I intend getting part time work after 4-6 months when I have hopefully done all those big jobs around the house which have been on the back-burner for years. If things work out OK, I may continue through the 65 year barrier and keep part time until my wife also feels like retiring. I have just spent 20 years in the aviation industry, and its pretty hard to realise that before that I was 25 years in the automotive world, starting as an apprentice mechanic in 1967 and ending up in fleet leasing and management in the 1980's.

    Advertisement


    I have been asked what car I might restore, or whatever, and I guess that is on the cards when I have got the extra carport built and the garden landscaping finished. I was thinking about a 190E Mercedes from about 1992, as my wife always said she liked them, but when I mentioned it the other day she said don't bother, because after driving the Renault Scenic for 8 years, she won't want a car with a low seat again. So either that leaves me the opportunity to go for something completely different for a "Sunday" car, or maybe I should look at another old Scenic, and build up a fleet of them - Jo Proffi/KenFuego style!

    Fortunately, I was able to part on good terms with my employer, I received some nice parting gifts from them and my workmates, and my family came up with the goods by giving me a nice Ryobi cordless tool kit, including the cordless radio! One of the girls in my office gave me the nicest clock/weather station in the style of a vintage sports car dashboard.

    So I'm having the week off, visiting friends, cups of coffee, etc, and next week getting started on the garden. Hopefully I might even be able to make it to the Perth French Car Festival on Sunday.

    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Retirement came easy.-ryobi-resized.jpg   Retirement came easy.-retirement-cake.jpg   Retirement came easy.-retirement-clock.jpg  
    2004 Scenic I 2.0 auto (Hers)
    2016 Ford Territory (His)
    2004 WRX (Sunday car)

  2. #2
    bob
    bob is offline
    1000+ Posts
    Join Date
    May 2001
    Location
    Skipton
    Posts
    2,531

    Default

    G'day,

    Quote Originally Posted by Fordman View Post
    .......I am calling it semi-retirement because I intend getting part time work after 4-6 months.......
    you wont have time mate !

    I struggle to fit in one day a week in charge of all the crap that no one else wants to do at the old factory, but it pays better than the pension

    cheers,
    Bob

  3. #3
    1000+ Posts
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    Geraldton
    Posts
    1,634

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Fordman View Post

    I have been asked what car I might restore, or whatever, and I guess that is on the cards when I have got the extra carport built and the garden landscaping finished. I was thinking about a 190E Mercedes from about 1992, as my wife always said she liked them, but when I mentioned it the other day she said don't bother, because after driving the Renault Scenic for 8 years, she won't want a car with a low seat again. So either that leaves me the opportunity to go for something completely different for a "Sunday" car, or maybe I should look at another old Scenic, and build up a fleet of them - Jo Proffi/KenFuego style!




    Well done enjoy.

    How about a 404 ute? High enough for your wife stay perched above the plebs, a workhore for the weekend and capable of roughing it when the going gets tough...

    Or even a plain old 404. They do sit high.
    Daily Drivers: R10, R12, R17T(?) Decouvrable

    In the Shed(s):
    R8 (1.4 motor, 4 shock rear end), Dauphine, Pugeot 404

    In the Past:
    Dauphine X2, R10 X lots, R12 X2, R16TS, R17TS

  4. #4
    1000+ Posts Kim Luck's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    Melbourne, Aus.
    Posts
    18,563

    Default

    Maybe when your partner realises that you are on call 24/7 for chore duties you might be looking to join the workforce full time again! In the meantime, enjoy!
    Don't it always seem to go that you don't know what you've got 'til it's gone............

  5. #5
    1000+ Posts
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    Melbourne Victoria
    Posts
    12,608

    Default

    As you are aware, My wife, your wife, and I will be watching your retirement progress and recapping on it in the New year!!

    Enjoy that retirement and get rid of all the retirement jobs in the next six months, as after that, you won't have time!!

    Now if only my wife had kept working, that would have kept me nicely in the style and comfort that I would like to be accustomed, congrats to your "better half" for that decision!!

    ken

  6. #6
    Member dunky's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2001
    Location
    Nambucca Heads
    Posts
    114

    Default

    Ahh Fordman, I retired 3 years ago thinking along the same lines as you. Hasn't happened. I'm just enjoying myself too much to go back to work again even if someone did want me. And now that we've moved to Nambucca Heads ...........forget it. Bob

  7. #7
    Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Long Beach NSW Australia
    Posts
    73

    Default

    Just remember that you have only gained 8 hours a day, not the 24 that your wife will think.........

    As a project why not consider a 16TS, unique style, great performance, good economy, driver and passengers sit high, great utility......

  8. #8
    JBN
    JBN is offline
    1000+ Posts JBN's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    Sydney
    Posts
    8,518

    Default

    Once you become retired, everyone seems to think you have tons of time and they have a solution on how to waste it.

    When you are employed by someone else, generally on set hours per day/week, you know when your day starts and when it finishes. In retirement, it starts when you get up and finishes when you go to bed. I'd like to get a "job" with regular hours so I can have a break from my busy retirement.

    John

  9. #9
    1000+ Posts FIVEDOOR's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    Brisbane Qld
    Posts
    21,046

    Default

    My father retired at 65 years of age 12 years ago. The other day he said it has been the best part of his life. Enjoy

  10. #10
    Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Long Beach NSW Australia
    Posts
    73

    Default

    I finished gainful employment 10 years ago, now busy enjoying myself........wife and I have taken a year to tour Europe and the UK, life's a blast........remember you're a long time looking up from a box.

  11. #11
    BVH Roger Wilkinson's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    Warrnambool
    Posts
    2,412

    Default

    Great inscription on the cake!

    Here's a vehicle with a high-ish sitting position you may not have considered: a DS.

    Roger

  12. #12
    Fellow Frogger!
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    Coffs Harbour, NSW, Australia
    Posts
    626

    Default

    First requirement is a watch with DAY & date , so you know what day it is & if it is the weekend !

    Richard

  13. #13
    JBN
    JBN is offline
    1000+ Posts JBN's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    Sydney
    Posts
    8,518

    Default

    I was ready for retirement at 18, but couldn't make it pay. Took the rest of my life to be able to afford to retire. With retirement I found out that I had about as much money to spend as when I was 18. Somewhere I think I stuffed up.

    John

  14. #14
    Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Long Beach NSW Australia
    Posts
    73

    Default

    Don't forget the downside of retirement.......no more morning and afternoon tea breaks, no public holidays, no days off, no sick leave............

    The problem with the project options put forward, other than mine of course, is while they may be good cars they are not RENAULTS...

  15. #15
    dvr
    dvr is offline
    Fellow Frogger!
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    Sydney
    Posts
    754

    Default

    I reckon if you're going to restore a car get something that will cost you the least in the longer run. There's as much effort straightening and painting something collectable as there is doing up an orphan nobody will want after you. Or find something that's had the work done and focus on the part you prefer to do, even if it's just washing, polishing and general maintenance.

    There are plenty of vehicles that have been restored and are being sold below what their owners invested.

  16. #16
    JBN
    JBN is offline
    1000+ Posts JBN's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    Sydney
    Posts
    8,518

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by dvr View Post
    I reckon if you're going to restore a car get something that will cost you the least in the longer run. There's as much effort straightening and painting something collectable as there is doing up an orphan nobody will want after you. Or find something that's had the work done and focus on the part you prefer to do, even if it's just washing, polishing and general maintenance.

    There are plenty of vehicles that have been restored and are being sold below what their owners invested.
    Get a 2CV to restore. They are simple and easy to work on. Even if the restoration doesn't progress past cleaning the chickenshit off the paintwork, that's OK.

    You don't have to worry about leaving it to your heirs. Just whip off the bootlid, remove the rear seat and passengers seat and voila.....your coffin can be slipped in through the boot opening up to the front passengers footwell.

    Then the only decision is burial or cremation. A decent backhoe can shove the car and your carcase into a normal sized grave. Otherwise, 20 litres of fuel (E10 for the greenies) liberally spread over the interior, followed by a match and its 2CV flambe.

    John

  17. #17
    1000+ Posts
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    Melbourne Victoria
    Posts
    12,608

    Default retirement is for doing exactly what you want, or not as you might contemplate!!

    Quote Originally Posted by citroenut View Post
    First requirement is a watch with DAY & date , so you know what day it is & if it is the weekend !

    Richard
    Not so sure about that, I have quite a few in a drawer including a retirement one. I just don't bother to wear them anymore and while they have remained tucked away, the batteries have run flat. Of the others, I can't be bothered to wind them each day, and the one that automatically winds itself as you run, jump, skip, stumble, ran out of puff just like me!! And as I aged (matured like fine wine or green cheese) My arm was either not long enough to focus on the those little calendar thingies, or the figures shrunk, and I can't be bothered carrying a magnifying glass, it seems I now need to read them, and even then with lack of use, no winding, no activity the give up.

    For a while a mobile phone seemed the way to go, as the day date and calendar as well as the time was there in big figures, but then I got tired of carrying that as it just cost lots to feed it every month or so, and I had given my other phone to my wife after I retired as it is so much cheaper with its average $9 each billing period and no monthly minimum. Anyway phones are just for people to ask me to do things...so if turned off no problem and I don't really miss it. Maybe if I had one of those fancy phones with a camera in one side, and a strokeable touch face to play games on or spin pictures of look like I am conducting an orchestra as you stroke it and things get smaller and larger as you young blokes play with then.

    Damn can't be bothered, too much trouble to learn the tricks and then if you drop them or lean on them the screen breaks and the toy is useless.

    Just break your day into hungry and non hungry periods, with the occasional nap, ie, do things that you want to or nothign at all if that suits you, now that is retirement, free of gadgets, and potter around and decide what project you might want to work on, if all else fails read a book or go down to the Library and read all those magazines that you used to buy one upon a time, but only read half way through, put it down when interrupted and forget to pick it up - a whole new world.

    Oh and take a tip from me, retire from all committees when you retire from work on the excuse you might travel and then you wont have to bother with them, and if you get bored, have a mental joust on the internet, to keep your mind active.....

    Only kidding...but it works for me ....sometimes!!

    Ken.

  18. #18
    1000+ Posts Fordman's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Location
    Perth/West Australia
    Posts
    1,531

    Default

    Lots of food for thought there, thanks for the support and warnings!

    Taking one thing at a time, firstly the resto car - good comments. Having been (or still am?) a mechanic, I am very comfortable with getting a car with a good rust-free body, even if the engine has a con-rod hanging out of the block. I always reckon you can bring mechanical bits back to almost new condition, but if the body is bent or rusted, it takes so much more work and money to do it. I have always resisted starting a project because I am very aware of the cost and time involved, and I haven't wanted to start a "never gets finished" project, but now I may be able to. I agree with the comments that a common (low value) car may cost as much to restore as a collectible, and neither may recoup what has gone into it, so it probably has to be something you really want to do. Funnily, JBN, I agree that the 2CV is probably a good one if you could pick one up somewhere - everybody's favourite novelty car - they must always retain some value as they get even older. Taking a practical view (thats me all over), at the moment I am thinking maybe when I am ready, I could pick up a cheap Series II Scenic, one of the more specced up models with cruise control (which was not available in series I) and maybe even a 6 speed manual for a bit more driving enjoyment. Then the wife would drive it as well (with the higher seating position) and we would have a genuine "spare" vehicle, which would also be better on the country runs. Not quite a restoration job, but well within my capabilities and the limitation of a suburban back yard workshop, and good value for money. Wait and see what comes along is also the catch-cry.

    As far as keeping track of the day of the week, I'm in front on that one. I do use a watch with the day in big enough letters, and it covers Ken's problem of the batteries as well. I picked it up a couple of years ago and it does everything I want, and more. Its a Casio "Tough Solar" digital, cost about $120, one of the main reasons I got it was the ease of changing time zones as I have been going back and forth to ES quite often. Then I found it has a great stop-watch, with lap time storage normally found on expensive chronometers, good alarm settings for travelling, etc. The solar bit is intriguing, it keeps itself fully charged with about 20 minutes of exposure per day, and if left closed up in a box, should last for about 13 months without recharging!

    Roger, the inscription on the cake is significant because my work was in aircraft maintenance technical records, and I was the office "Hercule Poirot", solving all the mysteries created by other people, mainly engineers who wrote down wrong part and serial numbers (they usually claim to have poor reading eyesight!), and having the dubious reputation of not making any mistakes myself - they'll all be looking for them now!

    And a few of your comments along the lines of "you'll find it hard to go back to work" - I'm listening! Time will tell.
    2004 Scenic I 2.0 auto (Hers)
    2016 Ford Territory (His)
    2004 WRX (Sunday car)

  19. #19
    1000+ Posts
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    Melbourne Victoria
    Posts
    12,608

    Icon14 Nice working excursion/holiday for a "Fordman"

    Now this is something you "might" think about that could use your auto mechanic skills to get a Ford LTD in nice working order for the trip back to WA while at the same time fixing a corroded water pump on a Holden and perhaps a Camry that requires attention at a country location. I'm sure we could work out a deal to satisfy everyone - would fill in all that idle time, hone the skills and take your pick. You know the cars

    And no hurry, plenty of time for anything you want to see or do, and a roof over your head...

    Only downside to the Ltd is the thirsty V8 motor.... nice leather comfort....

    Jest a thought, enjoy your retired status mate! I am sure you will be able to pick and choose and do whatever you want or not, as you prepare for the next thirty years enjoying life!

    Ken

  20. #20
    Tadpole
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    Adelaide
    Posts
    23

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by citroenut View Post
    First requirement is a watch with DAY & date
    It's easy....everyday is a Saturday.
    One of the biggest joys of retirement is no longer having to respond to the alarm clock
    although I soon get told by SWMBO at about 8:30am to get up and drive the coffee machine.
    You'll soon fall into the role of full-time maintenance man but with a different boss.

    Valvster

  21. #21
    1000+ Posts Fordman's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Location
    Perth/West Australia
    Posts
    1,531

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Kenfuego View Post
    Now this is something you "might" think about that could use your auto mechanic skills to get a Ford LTD in nice working order for the trip back to WA while at the same time fixing a corroded water pump on a Holden and perhaps a Camry that requires attention at a country location. I'm sure we could work out a deal to satisfy everyone - would fill in all that idle time, hone the skills and take your pick. You know the cars
    Ken
    Don't worry, Ken, the LTD has been on my mind. I didn't know if it was still there - and sounds like you haven't fixed the Camry yet - ah well, thats retirement for you - just may take you up on that one day, maybe?
    2004 Scenic I 2.0 auto (Hers)
    2016 Ford Territory (His)
    2004 WRX (Sunday car)

  22. #22
    1000+ Posts schlitzaugen's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    loneliness capital of the world
    Posts
    9,319

    Default

    How about a Merc finnie? Comfy seats, style, power, what else?

    But as I age, I find the more I think about restorations, the more I like the idea of having a ratty looking banger with nice smooth mechanicals. I got to the point that I wouldn't turn away an auto either if it was a car I really liked like the finnie, something that would make my wife raise an eyebrow.
    ACHTUNG ALLES LOOKENPEEPERS

    Das computermachine is nicht fur gefingerpoken und mittengrabben. Ist easy schnappen der springenwerk, blowenfusen und poppencorken mit spitssparken. Ist nicht fur gewerken bei das dummkopfen. Das rubbernecken sightseeren keepen hands in das pockets-relaxen und watch das blinkenlights.

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •